Javascript Bible, Third Edition with CD Rom

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Overview

Create Web Pages That Think! Whether you're a novice Web author wondering what JavaScript can do for you or a seasoned HTML scripter anxious to exploit JavaScript's evolving functionality, this authoritative, all-in-one resource -- by the most experienced computer scripting author in the industry -- lets you create pages so inviting, users will spend more time at your Web site and come back for more!

For Cool Web Pages, Master Today's Hottest ...

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Overview

Create Web Pages That Think! Whether you're a novice Web author wondering what JavaScript can do for you or a seasoned HTML scripter anxious to exploit JavaScript's evolving functionality, this authoritative, all-in-one resource -- by the most experienced computer scripting author in the industry -- lets you create pages so inviting, users will spend more time at your Web site and come back for more!

For Cool Web Pages, Master Today's Hottest Scripting Language!

  • Get up to speed FAST with "crash courses" on programming fundamentals and object-oriented basics
  • Key into the lessons you need with clearly labeled beginning, intermediate, and advanced terminology
  • Implement JavaScript into your site with step-by-step how-to's
  • Learn from ready-to-run JavaScript and HTML examples
  • Apply expert script debugging and design tips
  • Get ongoing support at IDG Books Worldwide and Danny Goodman's Web sites


This excellent tutorial showcases the capabilities of JavaScript 1.2 and the scripting language for the Dynamic HTML of Navigator 4 and Explorer 4 browsers. This revised edition now includes a separate tutorial and reference sections for a wide variety of students.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
The author covers the basics of document objects and forms, control structures, functions, operators, Java applets, the differences between Netscape and Microsoft's implementations of JavaScript, cross- browser dynamic HTML applications, and debugging tools. Includes beginning and advanced tutorials, and appends answers to the tutorial exercises as well as a list of JavaScript Internet resources. The CD- ROM contains the complete JavaScript for the examples in the book and seven additional chapters with working applications, including calendars, forms, graphics, intelligent flags, and a decision helper. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764531880
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/16/1998
  • Series: Bible Series
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 1056
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.27 (h) x 1.94 (d)

Meet the Author


Danny Goodman is respected for his numerous bestselling books on scripting and application-building and beloved for his engaging approach to teaching technology.
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Read an Excerpt


Chapter 4: Browser and Document Objects

This chapter marks the first of nine tutorial chapters (which compose Part 11) tailored to authors who have at least basic grounding in HTML concepts. You will see several practical applications of JavaScript and begin to see how a JavaScript-enabled browser turns familiar HTML elements into objects that your scripts control.

Scripts Run the Show

If you have authored in plain HTML, you are familiar with how HTML tags influence the way content is rendered on a page when viewed in the browser. As the page loads, the browser recognizes tags (by virtue of their containing angle brackets) as formatting instructions. Instructions are read from the top of the document downward, and elements defined in the HTML document appear on screen in the same order in which they are entered in the document. As an author, you do a little work one time up front - adding the tags - and the browser does a lot more work every time a visitor loads the page into a browser.

Assume for a moment that one of the elements on the page is a text field inside a form. The user is supposed to enter some text in the text field and then click the Submit button to send that information back to the Web server. If that information must be an Internet e-mail address, how do you ensure the user included the "@" symbol in the address?

One way is to have a Common Gateway Interface (CGI) program on the server scan the submitted form data after the user has clicked the Submit button and the form information has been transferred to the server. If the user omitted or forgot the "@" symbol, the CGI program resends the page, but this time with an instruction to include the symbol in the address. Nothing is wrong with this exchange, but it means a significant delay for the user to find out that the address does not contain the crucial symbol. Moreover, the Web server has has been transferred to the server. If the user omitted or forgot the "@" symbol, the CGI program resends the page, but this time with an instruction to include the symbol in the address. Nothing is wrong with this exchange, but it means a significant delay for the user to find out that the address does not contain the crucial symbol. Moreover, the Web server has had to expend some of its resources to perform the validation and communicate back to the visitor. If the Web site is a busy vile, the server may stop, trying to perform hundreds of these validations at any given moment, probably slowing response time to the user even more.

Now imagine if the document containing that text field had some intelligence built into it that could make sure the text field entry contains the IV symbol before ever sending one bit (literally) of data to the server. That kind of intelligence would have to be embedded in the document in some fashion downloaded with the page's content so it can stand ready to jump into action when called upon. The browser must know how to run that embedded program Some user action must start the program, perhaps when the user clicks the Start button. As the program runs, if it detects a lack of the "( )" symbol, an alert message should appear to bring the problem to the, user's attention.

This kind of presubmissiondata entry validation is but one of the practical many. JavaScript adds intelligence to an HTML document.. leaving as this as an example, you might recognize that a script must know how to look into what has been typed text field; a script must also know hopw to let a submission continue or how to abort the submission. A browser capable of running JavaScript programs conveniently treats elements such as the text field as 6hpms. A JavaScript script controls the action and behavior of objects - most of which you see in the browser window.

JavaScript in Action

By adding lines of JavaScript code, to your HTML documents, you control on screen objects as your applications requires. To give you an idea of the scope of application you can create with JavaScript, I show you several applications from the CD- ROM (in the folder named Bonus Applications)- I strongly urge you open the applications and play with them in your browser- Links to the application files from the CD-ROM can be found on the page tutor.htm in the listings folder. I also provide URLs to the examples at my Web site.

Interactive user interfaces

HTML hyperlinks do a fine job, but they're not necessarily the most engaging way to present a table of contents to a large site or document. With a bit of JavaScript, it is possible to create an interact've and expandable table of contents listing that displays the hierarchy of a large body of material (see Figure 4-1).

Click on a gray widget icon to expand the items underneath. An endpoint item has an orange and black widget icon. Items in the outline can be links to other pages or descriptive information. You also maintain the same kind of font control over each entry as you would expect from HTML. While such outlines have been created with server CGIs in the past, the response time between clicks is terribly slow. By placing all of the smarts behind the outline inside the page, it downloads once and runs quickly after each click.

As demonstrated in the detailed description of this outline in the application Outline- Style Table of Contents (Chapter 50 of the bonus applications chapters on the CD- ROM), the scriptable workings can be implemented within straight HTML for Navigator 2 and 3 and in Dynamic HTML for Navigator 4 and Internet Explorer 4. Either way you do it, the quick response and action on the screen makes for a more engaging experience for Web surfers who are in a hurry to scout your site.

Small data lookup

A common application on the Web is having a CGI program present a page that visitors use to access large databases on the server. Large data collections are best left on the server, where search engines and other technologies are the best fit. But If your page acts as a "front end" to a small data collection lookup, you can consider embedding that data collection in the document (out of view) and letting JavaScript act as the intermediary between user and data.

I've done just that in a Social Security prefix lookup system shown in Figure 4-2. 1 converted a printed table of about 55 entries into a JavaScript table that occupies only a few hundred bytes. When the visitor types the three-character prefix of his or her Social Security number into the field and clicks the Search button, a script...

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Table of Contents


Foreword ... vii
Preface ... x
Part I Getting Started with JavaScript ... 1
Chapter 1 JavaScript's Role in the World Wide Web ... 3
Chapter 2 Authoring Challenges amid the Browser Wars ... 11
Chapter 3 Your First JavaScript Script ... 17
Part II JavaScript Tutorial ... 27
Chapter 4 Browser and Document Objects ... 29
Chapter 5 Scripts and HTML Documents ... 51
Chapter 6 Programming Fundamentals, Part I ... 61
Chapter 7 Programming Fundamentals, Part II ... 71
Chapter 8 Window and Document Objects ... 85
Chapter 9 Forms and Form Elements ... 99
Chapter 10 Strings, Math, and Dates ... 113
Chapter 11 Scripting Frames and Multiple Windows ... 123
Chapter 12 Images and Dynamic HTML ...133
Part III JavaScript Object and Language Reference ... 141
Chapter 13 JavaScript Essentials ... 143
Chapter 14 The Window Object ... 167
Chapter 15 Location and History Objects ... 269
Chapter 16 The Document Object ... 297
Chapter 17 Link and Anchor Objects ... 341
Chapter 18 Image and Area Objects ... 353
Chapter 19 The Layer Object ... 367
Chapter 20 The Applet Object ... 409
Chapter 21 The Form Object ... 413
Chapter 22 Text-Related Objects ... 433
Chapter 23 Button Objects ... 457
Chapter 24 Select and FileUpload Objects ... 483
Chapter 25 Navigator and Other Environment Objects ... 505
Chapter 26 The String Object ... 537
Chapter 27 Math, Number, and Boolean Objects ... 567
Chapter 28 The Date Object ... 579
Chapter 29 The Array Object ... 595
Chapter 30 Regular Expression and RegExp Objects ... 619
Chapter 31 Control Structures ... 645
Chapter 32 JavaScript Operators ... 665
Chapter 33 The Event Object ... 685
Chapter 34 Functions and Custom Objects ... 699
Chapter 35 Global Functions and Statements ... 727
Chapter 36 Server-side JavaScript ... 737
Part IV Putting JavaScript to Work ... 747
Chapter 37 Data-Entry Validation ... 749
Chapter 38 LiveConnect: Scripting Java Applets and Plug-ins ... 773
Chapter 39 Advanced Event Handling ... 801
Chapter 40 Security and Signed Scripts ... 817
Chapter 41 Scripting Cross-Platform Dynamic HTML ...843
Chapter 42 Netscape Dynamic HTML and JavaScript Extensions ... 875
Chapter 43 Microsoft Dynamic HTML ... 891
Chapter 44 Internet Explorer 4 JScript and Object Model ... 907
Chapter 45 Debugging Script ... 915
Chapter 46 Authoring Tools ... 935
Part V Appendixes ... 943
Appendix A Netscape Navigator Object Road Map and Compatibility Guide ... 945
Appendix B JavaScript Reserved Words ... 951
Appendix C Answers to Tutorial Exercises ... 953
Appendix D JavaScript Internet Resources ... 969
Appendix E Using the CD-ROM ... 971
Index ... 975
End-User License Agreement ... 1016
CD-ROM Installation Instructions ... 1020
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Customer Reviews

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( 9 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2002

    Overly Verbose, Poorly Organized, Confusing Examples

    Although not advertised as a beginner's book, I feel that it had some obligation to clearly show how to write JavaScript as part of the book; rather, it 'offs' the 'tutorial', as though something not worthy of the weighty tome, to a CD. The rest of the book is then filled with cryptic examples, rather than a clear exposition of the elements of the language. I am an experienced programmer and have read my share of good and bad books, but this would have to go near the bottom. The publisher seemed to want to rush something - anything - out the door.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2001

    Definately a 5-Star Book

    This book provided an excellent basis for not learning JavaScript, but an excellent reference to turn back to. The example give solid understanding of the concepts of JavaScript and provide the foundation to learn beyond the teachings of the book. Good book for experienced programmers. The Best JavaScript book for beginners.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2000

    This is an almost worthless book.

    I found this book rather difficult to read, use or follow. I have some programming experience in other languages and I have read many programming books. However, this book is the worst one I have read so far. It is very poorly organized, and examples are not well explained. I can figure out most of the examples easily since I have some programming experience, but there are a handful that are still puzzling to me. The text seems to be aimed at a beginner, but it definitely is not. For example, it does not begin talking about control structures (if...else, etc.) until it reaches chapter 31, and chapter 32 introduces you to operator. However, this does not keep the author from using them in the first 30 chapters. Overall, I am very disappointed with this book and would not recommend it to anyone.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2000

    BEST!!!, javascript book, EVER!!!!

    THIS BOOK ROCKS!!! READ IT PAGE BY PAGE OR ONLY LOOK UP WHAT YOU NEED. EXCELLENT EXAMPLES!!! DANNY GOODMAN IS A FORCE TO BE RECKONED WITH!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2000

    I wish I could give three and a half stars

    The reason for the title is because this book is more for a reference than for starting out and making your own javascripts. If you can get through weeks of reading the same book and learning the same style this would be a great book for you. If you want to build complex javascripts in a few days to a week I don't recommend this book. This book is loaded with information which I did find useful. All in all this book is above average but not great.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2000

    Out of Date and CD BAD

    This book was written just after Netscape 4 and IE 4 came out. It is rather dated now. Also, the book refers to directories on the CD that don't exist, and the CD itself has broken links in HTML examples so you 'can't get there from here'.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2000

    Highly recommended

    The best JavaScript refrence I have found yet. Well organized and excellent supporting CD. Supports the Macintosh platform.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2000

    The Book Is OK.

    This Java Script Book is OK. I have never writted Java Script before, therefore, I needed to see more real world scenerios, followed by example outputs. The scripting examples are OK, but what does it look like after compilation?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2000

    Truly one of the best Javascript books available

    Danny Goodman's book is truly a Bible for Javascript programmers, old and new. For new JS'ers, it offers an excellent balance of 'user guide' and reference. And of course for the experienced user, the reference is an excellent resource. His coverage of real-world applications of javascript, not to mention his distinctions of browser implementation and compatibility issues, make the book stand out from the pack. His reference is also so well done, with clear indications of bowser compatibility for each element and a thoughtful bottom-of-the-page indicator of the element being references, which serves as a great mechanism for quickly looking up items. If you plan to use (or learn about) Javascript, you can do no better than to get this book. As a trainer and developer of a Javascript class, this is one of the two books (along with the O'Reilly book) that we offer as the references for our class.

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