×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

JavaScript Cookbook
  • Alternative view 1 of JavaScript Cookbook
  • Alternative view 2 of JavaScript Cookbook
     

JavaScript Cookbook

3.0 1
by Shelley Powers
 

See All Formats & Editions

Careful design and integration is required for many of the JavaScript functions used in today's web applications, but these functions often rely on the same core set of tasks. Rather than reinvent the wheel every time, you'll find ways to address these common tasks quickly through the recipes in this cookbook.

Covering both ECMAScript 5 and HTML5, JavaScript

Overview

Careful design and integration is required for many of the JavaScript functions used in today's web applications, but these functions often rely on the same core set of tasks. Rather than reinvent the wheel every time, you'll find ways to address these common tasks quickly through the recipes in this cookbook.

Covering both ECMAScript 5 and HTML5, JavaScript Cookbook helps you take advantage of the latest web features, including HTML5's persistent storage mechanisms and drawing canvas. You'll find solutions for integrating these features with JavaScript into UIs that people will enjoy using. The recipes in this book not only help you get things done, they'll also help you develop applications that work reliably in every browser.

  • Learn how JavaScript helps you reach into the core of pages and stylesheets to create interfaces
  • Understand how regular expressions can simplify key text and form processing challenges
  • Explore recent additions for storing application information inside the browser
  • Get started with common JavaScript libraries, including jQuery and Prototype
  • Apply XML and JSON to application-communication issues

Shelley Powers has been working with and writing about web technologies—from the first release of JavaScript to the latest graphics and design tools—for more than 12 years. Her recent O'Reilly books have covered the semantic web, Ajax, JavaScript, and web graphics. She's an avid amateur photographer and web development aficionado.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780596806132
Publisher:
O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
Publication date:
07/26/2010
Pages:
528
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.20(d)

Meet the Author

Author of Practical RDF and co-author of O'Reilly's Unix Power Tools 3E

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

JavaScript Cookbook 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
greygeek More than 1 year ago
I have enjoyed other cookbooks in the O'Reilly library of computer texts, so when I saw JavaScript Cookbook by Shelley Powers in the catalog, I jumped at it. The description mentioned that the book would cover HTML5 and ECMAScript 5, so I really wanted to learn the new capabilities of both. I did get to learn a lot, but I wonder if these new features are too new. Like other cookbooks in the O'Reilly library, this one is organized as a series of specific problems, with their solutions neatly presented and grouped into the major chapters. Each solution has a discussion to flesh out the details. The website has downloadable copies of the examples in the book, which I used to test out the various recipes. ECMAScript 5 is fairly new, and HTML5 is still under development, so I made sure I had the latest stable versions of the major browsers (Firefox, Google Chrome, Internet Explorer, Opera, and Safari) to see how they would cope. The HTML5 features are very sparsely supported as of yet, so those portions of the book should be considered more of a sampling of things to come rather than a definitive set of solutions. They start out easily enough with recipes for handling JavaScript strings. However, the discussion of String objects and literals obviously implies that the reader is already somewhat familiar with Object terminology and functionality. That makes this book unsuitable for beginners. While much of the book is applicable to today's browsers, there is a lot of coverage of the new capabilities made available in the new HTML5 specifications. Unfortunately, most browsers either do not support, or only partially support these features, so the information is only useful as a "taste of things to come". As I step back and reflect on this book, I think that many topics are solutions that cannot be implemented because the typically available browsers don't support the new features yet. If a web page designer wants their site to be available to users now, they need to focus on the features that are well entrenched across the internet. Having so many solutions based on features and capabilities that are still being defined is only useful as academic exercises. I would have preferred that the JavaScript Cookbook be more useful for the state of the web right now. That is why I'm rating it only 3 out of 5.