JavaScript: The Good Parts: The Good Parts

JavaScript: The Good Parts: The Good Parts

3.4 17
by Douglas Crockford
     
 

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Most programming languages contain good and bad parts, but JavaScript has more than its share of the bad, having been developed and released in a hurry before it could be refined. This authoritative book scrapes away these bad features to reveal a subset of JavaScript that's more reliable, readable, and maintainable than the language as a whole—a subset you

Overview

Most programming languages contain good and bad parts, but JavaScript has more than its share of the bad, having been developed and released in a hurry before it could be refined. This authoritative book scrapes away these bad features to reveal a subset of JavaScript that's more reliable, readable, and maintainable than the language as a whole—a subset you can use to create truly extensible and efficient code.

Considered the JavaScript expert by many people in the development community, author Douglas Crockford identifies the abundance of good ideas that make JavaScript an outstanding object-oriented programming language-ideas such as functions, loose typing, dynamic objects, and an expressive object literal notation. Unfortunately, these good ideas are mixed in with bad and downright awful ideas, like a programming model based on global variables.

When Java applets failed, JavaScript became the language of the Web by default, making its popularity almost completely independent of its qualities as a programming language. In JavaScript: The Good Parts, Crockford finally digs through the steaming pile of good intentions and blunders to give you a detailed look at all the genuinely elegant parts of JavaScript, including:

  • Syntax
  • Objects
  • Functions
  • Inheritance
  • Arrays
  • Regular expressions
  • Methods
  • Style
  • Beautiful features

The real beauty? As you move ahead with the subset of JavaScript that this book presents, you'll also sidestep the need to unlearn all the bad parts. Of course, if you want to find out more about the bad parts and how to use them badly, simply consult any other JavaScript book.

With JavaScript: The Good Parts, you'll discover a beautiful, elegant, lightweight and highly expressive language that lets you create effective code, whether you're managing object libraries or just trying to get Ajax to run fast. If you develop sites or applications for the Web, this book is an absolute must.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780596517748
Publisher:
O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
Publication date:
05/15/2008
Pages:
172
Sales rank:
298,680
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.08(h) x 0.44(d)

Meet the Author

Douglas Crockford is a Senior JavaScript Architect at Yahoo!, well known for introducing and maintaining the JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) format. He's a regular speaker at conferences on advanced JavaScript topics, and serves on the ECMAScript committee.

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JavaScript: The Good Parts: The Good Parts 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed reading this book. It has really helped me settle on some structures that I stick to when I develop now. The only reason I did not give this book 5 stars is because alot of the material is very opinionated. Also, I am a strong supporter of the continue statement. I have absolutely no idea why it would fall in the "bad parts" category.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lots of fluff. Doesn't explain well. I am an experienced programmer with 30+ years experience in assembly,C, C++, Java, C#.Net, PHP, and other languages, but this book doesn't help me learn Javascript. Many page links don't work. I'm deleting this from my NOOK HD+
Redsaz More than 1 year ago
For programmers of other programming languages, C/C++ or Java especially, that want to rapidly learn quality, effective JavaScript should read this book. The focus is on the JavaScript language itself, with very little mention of browser-specific details like DOM. It is certainly a no nonsense book; the terseness is a blessing. You'll begin learning immediately on the first chapter since all of the "beginner" topics so commonly found in these books, like "What is a variable? What is a function? Why a text editor and not a word processor?" are removed. Instead you find out what the good parts and bad parts are and why, like it says on the tin. In summary: If you can program already, and need to be brought up to speed on good JavaScript style, then this book will serve you well.
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HopeH More than 1 year ago
I'm still not finished. I bought the book because I wanted to brush up on JavaScript since I took it awhile ago in school. It is FULL of great information, but it is so deep that I am buying another book to go along with it: Object-oriented JavaScript.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
That's Crockford's approach to Javascript. I expected more. The examples were poor and he actually defends them by saying you just have to read them carefully. I think the lessons are muddled and if you're familiar with Crockford then you already know most of what's in this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Often this is said as if teaching were an accomplishment of less importance and requiring less skill. But whatever skills Crockford has and whatever information/advice he has to share are completely lost in his inability to teach. This book is terse, brief to the point of obscurity, lacking in explanation, and rushing to show quick, poorly documented examples so that everyone will be impressed with his ability to 'do' even though there is no clear exposition on how all the pieces of the examples work. Having worked deeply in JavaScript for well over a decade I have discovered and utilized many of the ideas here (and was happy to find some new ones), but it is unlikely that anyone who wasn't almost continually sumberged in Javascript day-in and day-out for many years would be able to draw anything constructive out of this book.