JavaServer Pages

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Overview

JavaServer Pages (JSP) has built a huge following since the release of JSP 1.0 in 1999, providing Enterprise Java developers with a flexible tool for the development of dynamic web sites and web applications. While new point releases over the years, along with the introduction of the JSP Standard Tag Library (JSTL), have incrementally improved the rough areas of the first version of the JSP specification, JSP 2.0 takes this technology to new heights.JavaServer Pages, Third Edition, is completely revised and ...

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JavaServer Pages

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Overview

JavaServer Pages (JSP) has built a huge following since the release of JSP 1.0 in 1999, providing Enterprise Java developers with a flexible tool for the development of dynamic web sites and web applications. While new point releases over the years, along with the introduction of the JSP Standard Tag Library (JSTL), have incrementally improved the rough areas of the first version of the JSP specification, JSP 2.0 takes this technology to new heights.JavaServer Pages, Third Edition, is completely revised and updated to cover the JSP 2.0 and JSTL 1.1 specifications. It includes detailed coverage of the Expression Language (EL) incorporated into JSP 2.0, the JSTL 1.1 tag libraries and the new function library, the new tag file format that enables custom tag library development without Java code, the simplified Java tag library API, improvements in the JSP XML syntax, and more. Further, it details setup of the Apache Tomcat server, JSP and JSTL syntax and features, error handling and debugging, authentication and personalization, database access, XML processing, and internationalization.This book recognizes the different needs of the two groups of professionals who want to learn JSP: page authors interested in using JSP elements in web pages, and programmers concerned with learning the JSP API and using JSP effectively as a part of an enterprise application. If you're in the first group, you'll learn from the practical web application examples in the second part of the book. If you're in the latter group, you'll appreciate the detailed coverage of advanced topics in the third part, such as how to integrate servlets and JavaBeans components with JSP using the popular Apache Struts MVC framework, and how to develop custom tag libraries using the JSP API, with realistic examples that you can use as a springboard for your own libraries."Hans Bergsten, a JSP expert group veteran and one of our most active contributors, has thoroughly and accurately captured the new features of JSP 2.0 and JSTL 1.1 in a way that is well-organized and easy to understand. With excellent, to-the-point examples, this book is a 'must have' for any serious JSP 2.0 developer."—Mark Roth, JSP 2.0 Specification Lead, Sun Microsystems, Inc.Hans Bergsten is the founder of Gefion Software, a company focused on Java services and products based on J2EE technologies. Hans has been an active participant in the working groups for both the servlet and JSP specifications since their inception and contributes to other related JCP specifications, such as JSP Standard Tag Library (JSTL) and JavaServer Faces (JSF), and, as one of the initial members of the Apache Jakarta Project Management Committee, helped develop the Apache Tomcat reference implementation for the servlet and JSP specifications.

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Editorial Reviews

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The Barnes & Noble Review
This is JSP 2.0 for the real world: all the JSP you’re likely to need.

Hans Bergsten introduces each JSP feature carefully and accurately: everything from retrieving user input to accessing JavaBeans components. You’ll learn good JSP practices (for instance, how to promote reusability). And you’ll find plenty of examples: database integration, authentication, personalization, caching, you name it.

Many examples -- such as XML processing -- use JSTL. Often, these replace custom components presented in earlier editions. That’s no coincidence: Bergsten’s examples helped shape the standard.

Since not everything’s in JSTL, Bergsten explains custom component development. He wraps up with integrating JSP and other Java technologies, notably Struts. Bill Camarda

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2003 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks for Dummies, Second Edition.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780596005634
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/28/2004
  • Edition description: Third Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 768
  • Product dimensions: 7.04 (w) x 9.18 (h) x 1.36 (d)

Meet the Author

Hans Bergsten is the founder of Gefion Software, a company focused on Java services and products based on the J2EE technlogies. Hans has been an active participant in the working groups for both the servlet and JSP specifications from the time they were formed. He also contributes to other related JCP specifications, such as JSP Standard Tag Libraries (JSTL), and helped get the development of the Apache Tomcat reference implementation for servlet and JSP started as one of the initial members of the Apache Jakarta Project Management Committee.

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Table of Contents

Preface;
What's in This Book;
Readers of the Second Edition;
Audience;
Organization;
About the Examples;
Conventions Used in This Book;
How to Contact Us;
Acknowledgments for First Edition;
Acknowledgments for Second Edition;
Acknowledgments for Third Edition;
Part I: JSP Application Basics;
Chapter 1: Introducing JavaServer Pages;
1.1 What Is JavaServer Pages?;
1.2 Why Use JSP?;
1.3 What You Need to Get Started;
Chapter 2: HTTP and Servlet Basics;
2.1 The HTTP Request/Response Model;
2.2 Servlets;
Chapter 3: JSP Overview;
3.1 The Problem with Servlets;
3.2 The Anatomy of a JSP Page;
3.3 JSP Processing;
3.4 JSP Application Design with MVC;
Chapter 4: Setting Up the JSP Environment;
4.1 Installing the Java Software Development Kit;
4.2 Installing the Tomcat Server;
4.3 Testing Tomcat;
4.4 Installing the Book Examples;
4.5 Example Web Application Overview;
Part II: JSP Application Development;
Chapter 5: Generating Dynamic Content;
5.1 Creating a JSP Page;
5.2 Installing a JSP Page;
5.3 Running a JSP Page;
5.4 Using JSP Directive Elements;
5.5 Using Template Text;
5.6 Using JSP Action Elements;
Chapter 6: Using JavaBeans Components in JSP Pages;
6.1 What Is a Bean?;
6.2 Declaring a Bean in a JSP Page;
6.3 Reading Bean Properties;
6.4 Setting Bean Properties;
Chapter 7: Using Custom Tag Libraries and the JSP Standard Tag Library;
7.1 What Is a Custom Tag Library?;
7.2 Installing a Custom Tag Library;
7.3 Declaring a Custom Tag Library;
7.4 Using Actions from a Tag Library;
Chapter 8: Processing Input and Output;
8.1 Reading Request Parameter Values;
8.2 Validating User Input;
8.3 Formatting HTML Output;
Chapter 9: Error Handling and Debugging;
9.1 Dealing with Syntax Errors;
9.2 Debugging a JSP Application;
9.3 Dealing with Runtime Errors;
Chapter 10: Sharing Data Between JSP Pages, Requests, and Users;
10.1 Passing Control and Data Between Pages;
10.2 Sharing Session and Application Data;
10.3 Online Shopping;
10.4 Memory Usage Considerations;
Chapter 11: Developing Custom Tag Libraries as Tag Files;
11.1 Creating and Using a Tag File;
11.2 Accessing Attribute Values;
11.3 Processing the Action Body;
11.4 Processing Fragment Attributes;
11.5 Exposing Data to the Calling Page Through Variables;
11.6 Aborting the Page Processing;
11.7 Packaging Tag Files for Easy Reuse;
Chapter 12: Accessing a Database;
12.1 Accessing a Database from a JSP Page;
12.2 Validating Complex Input Without a Bean;
12.3 Using Transactions;
12.4 Application-Specific Database Actions;
Chapter 13: Authentication and Personalization;
13.1 Container-Provided Authentication;
13.2 Application-Controlled Authentication;
13.3 Other Security Concerns;
Chapter 14: Internationalization;
14.1 How Java Supports Internationalization and Localization;
14.2 Generating Localized Output;
14.3 A Brief History of Bits;
14.4 Handling Localized Input;
Chapter 15: Working with XML Data;
15.1 Generating an XML Response;
15.2 Transforming XML into HTML;
15.3 Transforming XML into a Device-Dependent Format;
15.4 Processing XML Data;
Chapter 16: Using Scripting Elements;
16.1 Using page Directive Scripting Attributes;
16.2 Implicit JSP Scripting Objects;
16.3 Using Scriptlets;
16.4 Using Expressions;
16.5 Using Declarations;
16.6 Mixing Action Elements and Scripting Elements;
16.7 Dealing with Scripting Syntax Errors;
Chapter 17: Bits and Pieces;
17.1 Buffering;
17.2 Including Page Segments;
17.3 Global Configuration Options;
17.4 Mixing Client-Side and Server-Side Code;
17.5 Precompiling JSP Pages;
17.6 Preventing Caching of JSP Pages;
17.7 Writing JSP Pages as XML Documents;
17.8 How URIs Are Interpreted;
Part III: JSP in J2EE and JSP Component Development;
Chapter 18: Web Application Models;
18.1 The Java 2 Enterprise Edition Model;
18.2 The MVC Design Model;
18.3 Scalability;
Chapter 19: Combining JSP and Servlets;
19.1 Servlets, Filters, and Listeners;
19.2 Picking the Right Component Type for Each Task;
19.3 Initializing Shared Resources Using a Listener;
19.4 Access Control Using a Filter;
19.5 Centralized Request Processing Using a Servlet;
19.6 Using a Common JSP Error Page;
Chapter 20: Developing JavaBeans Components for JSP;
20.1 Beans as JSP Components;
20.2 JSP Bean Examples;
20.3 Unexpected <jsp:setProperty> Behavior;
Chapter 21: Developing Custom Tag Libraries Using Java;
21.1 Developing Simple Tag Handlers;
21.2 Developing Classic Tag Handlers;
21.3 Developing Tag Library Functions;
21.4 Creating the Tag Library Descriptor;
21.5 Packaging and Installing a Tag Library;
Chapter 22: Advanced Custom Tag Library Features;
22.1 Developing Cooperating Actions;
22.2 Validating Syntax;
22.3 Using a Listener in a Tag Library;
22.4 Dynamic Attribute Values and Types;
Chapter 23: Integrating Custom Code with JSTL;
23.1 Setting and Using Configuration Variables;
23.2 Integrating Custom Conditional Actions;
23.3 Integrating Custom Iteration Actions;
23.4 Integrating Custom I18N Actions;
23.5 Integrating Custom Database Actions;
23.6 Using JSTL Tag Library Validators;
Chapter 24: Database Access Strategies;
24.1 JDBC Basics;
24.2 Using Connections and Connection Pools;
24.3 Making a Connection Pool Available to Application Components;
24.4 Using a Generic Database Bean;
24.5 Developing Application-Specific Database Components;
Part IV: Appendixes;
Appendix A: JSP Elements Reference;
A.1 Directive Elements;
A.2 Scripting Elements;
A.3 Action Elements;
A.4 Custom actions;
A.5 Comments;
A.6 Escape Characters;
Appendix B: JSTL Actions and API Reference;
B.1 JSTL Library URIs and Default Prefixes;
B.2 Core Library Actions;
B.3 Internationalization and Formatting Actions;
B.4 Database Access Actions;
B.5 XML Processing Actions;
B.6 EL Functions;
B.7 Support and Utility Types;
B.8 Configuration Settings;
Appendix C: JSP Expression Language Reference;
C.1 Syntax;
C.2 Variables;
C.3 Data Types;
C.4 Expressions and Operators;
Appendix D: JSP API Reference;
D.1 Implicit Variables;
D.2 Other Servlet Types Accessible Through Implicit Variables;
D.3 Tag Handler Types;
D.4 Translation Time Types;
D.5 Other JSP Types;
D.6 Expression Language Types;
Appendix E: Book Example Custom Actions and API Reference;
E.1 Generic Custom Actions;
E.2 Generic Utility Classes;
Appendix F: Web Application Structure and Deployment Descriptor Reference;
F.1 Web Application File Structure;
F.2 Web Application Deployment Descriptor;
F.3 Creating a WAR File;
Colophon;

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Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2003

    Separate java and HTML

    Very recently (late 2003), Java Server Pages underwent a major official upgrade to Version 2. In part, this was driven by success. The sheer popularity of Version 1, which dates from 1997, also let to many ideas for improvements. Bergsten devotes the bulk of this book to explaining these. Some of you who coded with Version 1 and used earlier texts may notice the heft of this, compared to those. Look, there is one immediate reason, as explained by Bergsten, why Version 2 is better than Version 1, and why you should migrate, presumably with the help of this book! If you wrote JSPs, like me, then your java code is generously littered with out.println(), wherein are strings with HTML tags. We can all appreciate Version 1 for its power and ingenuity in making dynamic web pages. But that interleaving of java and embedded HTML looks kludgy. (It is!) But aside from aesthetics, it scales badly with the size of the website you are supporting. And it is hard for you, the developer, and the HTML page designer to interact. The key innovation is how Version 2 lets you separate the java and HTML far more cleanly. Not a complete refactoring, perhaps. But close enough to justify you investing some time in moving to it. The payoff should be considerable. How does Version 2 do this? Well, you should read the book to find out.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2002

    Good Reference for Neophites

    I had to learn JSP quickly for a project I am working on, and this book was extremely helpful. It gives step-by-step instructions on how to get started. There are also some good examples. It's an excellent reference for beginners!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2001

    The absolute BEST JSP book on the market!!

    I have gone through multiple books on JavaServer pages, and my co-workers and I agree that this is the best book out there for JSP. The book is very thorough, yet very easy-to-understand. The book contains contains countless, easy-to-follow examples with detailed text explaining what each one does. And unlike some of the previous books that I have read, the examples in this one actually work!! The index is one of the best I have ever seen and is extremely useful. I will look forward to more books by this author.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2001

    A must-have for JSP developers

    This book should be on the book shelf of anyone doing development with Java Server pages. It is clear and informative, starting at the basics and moving all the way up through MVC patterns and JDBC pooling. It is also the best reference that I have found for quick access to all of the great JSP features.

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