Jazz Roots: McCoy Tyner Honors Jazz Piano Legends of the 20th Century

( 1 )

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - William Pearl
Roots finds one of the most influential jazz pianists of all time honoring some of his jazz piano favorites. Tyner, who has lost none of his vigor, verve, and supple musicality as he enters the sixth decade of his career, gives props to all the greats in doses both dynamic and loving on this impressive solo recording. Whether smoking through "A Night in Tunisia," romping through mid-tempo cruisers such as "Pannonica" and "Lullaby of Birdland," or caressing ballads like "Misty" and "My Foolish Heart," Tyner displays all the power and inventiveness that has made him one of the most admired players in modern jazz. Tyner needs a full band to make an impact like most of us ...
See more details below
CD
$10.21
BN.com price
(Save 14%)$11.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (CD)
  • All (4) from $4.19   
  • New (3) from $9.23   
  • Used (1) from $4.19   

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - William Pearl
Roots finds one of the most influential jazz pianists of all time honoring some of his jazz piano favorites. Tyner, who has lost none of his vigor, verve, and supple musicality as he enters the sixth decade of his career, gives props to all the greats in doses both dynamic and loving on this impressive solo recording. Whether smoking through "A Night in Tunisia," romping through mid-tempo cruisers such as "Pannonica" and "Lullaby of Birdland," or caressing ballads like "Misty" and "My Foolish Heart," Tyner displays all the power and inventiveness that has made him one of the most admired players in modern jazz. Tyner needs a full band to make an impact like most of us need an extra thumb. Roots turns into a simultaneous tribute to immortal players like Bud Powell, Thelonious Monk, Erroll Garner, Art Tatum, Keith Jarrett, and Chick Corea, as well as to Tyner's own undiminished strengths.
All Music Guide - Paula Edelstein
Jazz Roots: McCoy Tyner Honors Jazz Piano Legends of the 20th Century is an adventurous solo piano tribute primarily devoted to recreating the roots of jazz. The legendary pianist performs 14 compositions written by such jazz pianists as Thelonius Monk, Bud Powell, Duke Ellington, Art Tatum George Gershwin, Chick Corea, and Keith Jarrett. Tyner seeks nothing less than a variety of jazz styles ranging from the stride of ragtime to the syncopation and blue notes of mainstream. He finds a supply of strides, shimmering arpeggios, pianissimo, impressionist harmonies, undulating rhythms, and rhapsodic sonic grace on great songs such as "Ain't Misbehavin'," "Sweet and Lovely," "Lullaby of Birdland," "Happy Days," and "You Taught My Heart to Sing." The songs and artists McCoy Tyner has selected to pay tribute to are all great examples of his excellent ability to blend these various sources of inspiration and his compositional integrity into a coherent, persuasive whole. Nowhere is this clearer or more meaningful than on these solo concerts.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 10/24/2000
  • Label: Telarc
  • UPC: 089408350726
  • Catalog Number: 83507
  • Sales rank: 266,682

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 A Night in Tunisia (2:54)
  2. 2 Pannonica (3:37)
  3. 3 My Fooolish Heart (4:20)
  4. 4 Don't Get Around Much Anymore (4:26)
  5. 5 Blues for Fatha (4:00)
  6. 6 Sweet and Lovely (4:06)
  7. 7 Lullaby of Birdland (3:35)
  8. 8 You Taught My Heart to Sing (5:40)
  9. 9 Happy Days (5:50)
  10. 10 Rio (4:57)
  11. 11 Summertime (4:51)
  12. 12 St. Louis Blues (3:39)
  13. 13 Ain't Misbehavin' (3:41)
  14. 14 Misty (3:06)
Read More Show Less

Album Credits

Performance Credits
McCoy Tyner Primary Artist
Technical Credits
Erroll Garner Composer
Johnny Burke Composer
Elaine Martone Producer
Jack Renner Engineer
Bob Blumenthal Liner Notes
Anilda Carrasquillo Art Direction
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Roots To The Sky

    There is a grandeur to the musical universe of McCoy Tyner that wields a power so strong, that it seems ancient, like the venerable stillness of the pyramids. In his first solo recording in almost ten years, Tyner pays tribute to his pianistic peers and forebears, who have provided him both pleasure and influence over the years. What a pleasure for us it is to hear these compositions ¿ all standards save two pieces Tyner wrote for Chick Corea and Keith Jarrett ¿ interpreted by a master of the idiom. Tyner¿s singular harmonic sense and bold articulation bring new luster to these songs, enhancing their familiar contours with new hues, while reminding us why we loved them in the first place. The playful jaunt of Thelonious Monk¿s ¿Pannonica,¿ for example, comes alive with a Gershwin-esque feel, while ¿My Foolish Heart¿ (which he dedicates to Bill Evans) finds a deep emotional core that is quietly breathtaking. And, speaking of George Gershwin, Jazz Roots contains one of the most haunting interpretations of the composer¿s ¿Summertime¿ we may ever be privileged to hear; the blues run that he begins his solo with resonates like a trickle of tears. What makes this recording doubly fascinating is the personal sense of history that Tyner brings to the proceedings. Bebop pioneer Bud Powell, for instance, actually played the teenaged Tyner¿s piano in a visit to his home, and Art Tatum ¿ to whom McCoy dedicates ¿Sweet and Lovely¿ ¿ was one of the first musicians Tyner saw perform live. A word about the sound: Telarc¿s audiophile engineers have captured Tyner¿s immense presence as few have before, making the listener feel as if he¿s sitting on the piano bench with the man. Listen to this disc and hear, not only the roots of jazz, but the tree and all its branches.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews