Jazz Styles: History and Analysis / Edition 5

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Quarto, softcover, near fine in white pictorial wraps. No cassette included. Gridley teaches students how to listen and what to listen for in jazz--a highly effective textbook ... for students who have little or no exposure to jazz. Provides summaries of jazz innovators and musical trends. 21 guides for listening to classic recordings; an explanation of the elements of music for nonmusicians; an appendix for musicians that illustrates comping, bass lines, modes, and chord progressions; discusses selections in the Smithsonian Collection of Classic Jazz. 442 pp. Read more Show Less

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Overview

For undergraduate courses in Jazz History, Jazz Survey, Evolution of Jazz, Introduction to Jazz, and Jazz Appreciation.

America’s most widely used introduction to jazz, it teaches the chronology of jazz by showing students how to listen and what to notice in each style. Though originally conceived for nonmusicians and written at a college freshmen reading level, Jazz Styles also has been widely adopted in courses for musicians because of its point-by-point specification of each style’s musical characteristics and its technical appendix.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A text for courses in jazz appreciation, focusing on American instrumental jazz and emphasizing descriptions of jazz styles rather than a decade-by-decade chronicle. Contains chapter summaries, b&w photos, a chronology, guides to jazz albums and videos, and separate appendices on elements of music for musicians and nonmusicians. In this sixth edition chapters begin on the same page numbers as the fifth. Music cassettes/CD-ROMs are available. For high school through college students with no previous knowledge of music. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131759770
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall Professional Technical Reference
  • Publication date: 9/1/1993
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 5
  • Pages: 442

Table of Contents

Preface
1 Introduction 2
2 What is Jazz? 4
3 Appreciating Jazz Improvisation 11
4 Origins of Jazz 32
5 Early Jazz: Combo Jazz Prior to the Middle 1930s 53
6 Swing: The Early 1930s to the Late 1940s 86
7 Duke Ellington 106
8 The Count Basie Bands 126
9 Bop 139
10 Cool Jazz 174
11 Hard Bop 195
12 Miles Davis, His Groups and Sidemen 219
13 John Coltrane 252
14 1960s and 70s Avant-Garde and "Free" Jazz 272
15 Bill Evans, Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea, and Keith Jarrett 301
16 Jazz-Rock Fusion 324
Chronology of Jazz Styles Chart 356
Elements of Music 358
Guide to Album Buying 392
Guide to Jazz Videos 400
Glossary 401
Supplementary Reading 406
Sources for Notated Jazz Solos 412
For Musicians 415
Index 432
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Preface

The goal of the eighth edition of Jazz Styles was to give the reader a broader and more current picture of jazz while maintaining the same style and structure that has proven so effective in earlier editions. To reach this goal we have undertaken several significant additions to this edition, all of them came from the requests of students and professors familiar with earlier editions. The major additions are:

  1. A new chapter dealing with contemporary jazz
  2. A new concluding chapter
  3. New photos of Wynton Marsalis, John Zorn, Steve Turre, Joe Lovano, Bobby McFerrin, Cassandra Wilson, and Fats Waller

The contemporary jazz chapter (chapter 17) updates this text with a discussion of various jazz styles and performers from around 1980 to the present. With so many diverse approaches and phenomenal players coming to prominence in the last twenty years or so, it would be impossible to describe all developments and trends. This chapter presents some of the most important innovations, balancing musicians from different "camps." Though by no means comprehensive, this chapter should give students a firm foundation in many of the issues important to contemporary jazz while introducing some of the major players of the era.

The final chapter (chapter 18) poses several questions: What is jazz? (with some possible new conclusions to complement chapter 2); Why hasn't jazz become more popular?; What next?. While some possible solutions are suggested for each query, no definite conclusions are drawn. Instead, these questions are intended to serve as springboards for discussion and an opportunity for students to synthesize the material theyhave studied throughout the course of the text.

In fact, both new chapters pose several questions in addition to presenting a substantial amount of new information. For example, Chapter 17 briefly discusses the controversies that surround two prominent contemporary jazz musicians, as well as their contributions. It then asks what defines the jazz tradition-the way the music sounds, or the manner in which it is approached? This type of discussion has been present in just about every jazz circle from the earliest days of the music. The debate is not closed here, just propounded. Perhaps, in the jazz tradition, the asking of the question is more important than finding a conclusive answer.

Adding to an already outstanding text was an exciting, but daunting task. I'd like to thank many people for their contributions. First, I am ,grateful to Mark Gridley for writing such a comprehensive and significant text. Not only did he provide an exquisite backdrop for the contributions found here, but he composed a text that I have personally used and enjoyed in classes over the past several years.

Several people helped in the research, writing, and editing process of my contributions here. I am greatly indebted to those who freely shared their suggestions and comments about the writings with me: Joe DeFazio, Scott Garlock, Rob I-Hudson, Lee Heritage, John Wilson, Joe Rishel, Tom Blobner, Bryon Holly, and Jeremy Frantz. I'd also like to thank my colleagues at Duquesne University who have been so supportive in my taking on this project, especially Ed Kocher, David Stock, Jessica Wiskus, Lynn and Bill Purse, and Sister Carole Riley, as well as my colleagues, mentors, and friends Don Freund, Sven-David Sandstrom, Claude Baker, Fred Sturm, Amy Cutler, and In-Sil Yoo. Chris Johnson, from Prentice Hall, was incredibly helpful and friendly throughout this project. A special thanks goes to my mother, Dr. Tina Cantrell, who spent countless hours editing my writing. Most of all, I'd like to thank my students, who have made the research and teaching of jazz an incredibly gratifying experience.

David Cuttler
Duquesne University
June, 2002

Read More Show Less

Introduction

The goal of the eighth edition of Jazz Styles was to give the reader a broader and more current picture of jazz while maintaining the same style and structure that has proven so effective in earlier editions. To reach this goal we have undertaken several significant additions to this edition, all of them came from the requests of students and professors familiar with earlier editions. The major additions are:

  1. A new chapter dealing with contemporary jazz
  2. A new concluding chapter
  3. New photos of Wynton Marsalis, John Zorn, Steve Turre, Joe Lovano, Bobby McFerrin, Cassandra Wilson, and Fats Waller

The contemporary jazz chapter (chapter 17) updates this text with a discussion of various jazz styles and performers from around 1980 to the present. With so many diverse approaches and phenomenal players coming to prominence in the last twenty years or so, it would be impossible to describe all developments and trends. This chapter presents some of the most important innovations, balancing musicians from different "camps." Though by no means comprehensive, this chapter should give students a firm foundation in many of the issues important to contemporary jazz while introducing some of the major players of the era.

The final chapter (chapter 18) poses several questions: What is jazz? (with some possible new conclusions to complement chapter 2); Why hasn't jazz become more popular?; What next?. While some possible solutions are suggested for each query, no definite conclusions are drawn. Instead, these questions are intended to serve as springboards for discussion and an opportunity for students to synthesize thematerial they have studied throughout the course of the text.

In fact, both new chapters pose several questions in addition to presenting a substantial amount of new information. For example, Chapter 17 briefly discusses the controversies that surround two prominent contemporary jazz musicians, as well as their contributions. It then asks what defines the jazz tradition-the way the music sounds, or the manner in which it is approached? This type of discussion has been present in just about every jazz circle from the earliest days of the music. The debate is not closed here, just propounded. Perhaps, in the jazz tradition, the asking of the question is more important than finding a conclusive answer.

Adding to an already outstanding text was an exciting, but daunting task. I'd like to thank many people for their contributions. First, I am, grateful to Mark Gridley for writing such a comprehensive and significant text. Not only did he provide an exquisite backdrop for the contributions found here, but he composed a text that I have personally used and enjoyed in classes over the past several years.

Several people helped in the research, writing, and editing process of my contributions here. I am greatly indebted to those who freely shared their suggestions and comments about the writings with me: Joe DeFazio, Scott Garlock, Rob I-Hudson, Lee Heritage, John Wilson, Joe Rishel, Tom Blobner, Bryon Holly, and Jeremy Frantz. I'd also like to thank my colleagues at Duquesne University who have been so supportive in my taking on this project, especially Ed Kocher, David Stock, Jessica Wiskus, Lynn and Bill Purse, and Sister Carole Riley, as well as my colleagues, mentors, and friends Don Freund, Sven-David Sandstrom, Claude Baker, Fred Sturm, Amy Cutler, and In-Sil Yoo. Chris Johnson, from Prentice Hall, was incredibly helpful and friendly throughout this project. A special thanks goes to my mother, Dr. Tina Cantrell, who spent countless hours editing my writing. Most of all, I'd like to thank my students, who have made the research and teaching of jazz an incredibly gratifying experience.

David Cuttler
Duquesne University
June, 2002

Read More Show Less

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