Jeb Stuart: The Last Cavalier

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Overview

A full and definitive biography of the dashing and enigmatic Confederate hero of the Civil War: General J.E.B. Stuart.

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Editorial Reviews

Internet Book Watch
No front line general of the Confedracy was so dashing in conduct or so well thought of by his troops as the calvary commander Jeb Stuart. In Jeb Stuart: The Last Cavalier, biographer and historian Burke Davis provides a comprehensive, definitive, dramatic biography of this enigmatic and superbly competent Civil War "Hero of the Confederacy". We are taken from his childhood to his training at West Point, from his service on the Western frontier to his decision to stand with Virginia with the outbreak of hostilities between the Union and the Confederacy, through his many daring raids and battles to his final, fatal clash at Yellow Tavern. Jeb Stuart: The Last Cavalier is a superbly written and much appreciated contribution to the growing library of Civil War studies and biographies.
—Internet Book Watch
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781433297496
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/1/2009
  • Format: MP3 on CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Pages: 1
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Barrett Whitener has been narrating audiobooks since 1992. His recordings have won several awards, including the Audio Publishers Association's Audie® and four Earphones Awards. AudioFile magazine has cited him as among "The Best Voices of the Century.” He lives in Washington, D.C.

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Table of Contents

Introduction to the 2000 Edition
1 Old John Brown 3
2 The Young Warrior 17
3 On the Frontier 29
4 First Blood 50
5 Gathering the Clan 67
6 The Peninsula 90
7 Fame at a Gallop 107
8 A Week of Miracles 131
9 Easy Victories 154
10 Exit John Pope 173
11 Bloody Maryland 191
12 Enemy Country 211
13 War in Winter 238
14 Pelham's Last Fight 260
15 Chancellorsville 278
16 Prelude to Invasion 302
17 Gettysburg 322
18 The Receding Tide 350
19 In the Wilderness 377
20 Yellow Tavern 385
21 "God's Will Be Done" 410
Notes 422
Author's Acknowledgments 440
Bibliography 443
Index 449
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2003

    Stellar Biography

    Author Davis presents a compelling overall view of Stuart, his reputation and times, but then he launches into a detailed description of the battles in which he fought. I confess I found the latter a bit tedious because I am not well read in the subject of Civil War military strategy. Those who are, however, should find this book to be quite fascinating all the way through. I beg to disagree, though, with the person who reviewed it for bn.com and claimed that General Lee would NOT have criticized Stuart behind his back. One must place Lee's reputed remark in context. Indeed, R.E. Lee ordinarily would not have criticized one of his best officers, but the Battle of Gettysburg was so important to the outcome of the war for the South that no human being--in my opinion--could resist talking about that 'last Cavalier.' Stuart's not being on hand to advise Lee of the whereabouts of the Union army so plainly affected the Battle of Gettysburg that Lee must have been superhuman to resist making some derogatory remark. Lee was known to be a man of sterling character, but still he was human and not a god. Who in his right mind would NOT make some rather unkind remark about the handsome Stuart and his putting duty to his wife above his duty to his country, the up-until-then invincible Confederacy?

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