Jefferson Davis and His Generals : The Failure of Confederate Command in the West / Edition 1

Jefferson Davis and His Generals : The Failure of Confederate Command in the West / Edition 1

by Steven E. Woodworth
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0700605673

ISBN-13: 9780700605675

Pub. Date: 06/28/1990

Publisher: University Press of Kansas

Jefferson Davis is a historical figure who provokes strong passions among scholars. Through the years historians have placed him at both ends of the spectrum: some have portrayed him as a hero, others have judged him incompetent.

In Jefferson Davis and His Generals, Steven Woodworth shows that both extremes are accurate--Davis was both heroic and incompetent.

Overview

Jefferson Davis is a historical figure who provokes strong passions among scholars. Through the years historians have placed him at both ends of the spectrum: some have portrayed him as a hero, others have judged him incompetent.

In Jefferson Davis and His Generals, Steven Woodworth shows that both extremes are accurate--Davis was both heroic and incompetent. Yet neither viewpoint reveals the whole truth about this complicated figure. Woodworth's portrait of Davis reveals an experienced, talented, and courageous leader who, nevertheless, undermined the Confederacy's cause in the trans-Appalachian west, where the South lost the war.

At the war's outbreak, few Southerners seemed better qualified for the post of commander-in-chief. Davis had graduated from West Point, commanded a combat regiment in the Mexican War (which neither Lee nor Grant could boast), and performed admirably as U.S. Senator and Secretary of War. Despite his credentials, Woodworth argues, Davis proved too indecisive and inconsistent as commander-in-chief to lead his new nation to victory.

As Woodworth shows, however, Davis does not bear the sole responsibility for the South's defeat. A substantial part of that burden rests with Davis's western generals. Bragg, Beauregard, Van Dorn, Pemberton, Polk, Buckner, Hood, Forrest, Morgan, and the Johnstons (Albert and Joseph) were a proud, contentious, and uneven lot. Few could be classed with the likes of a Lee or a Jackson in the east. Woodworth assesses their relations with Davis, as well as their leadership on and off the battlefields at Donelson, Shiloh, Vicksburg, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, and Atlanta, to demonstrate their complicity in the Confederacy's demise.

Extensive research in the marvelously rich holdings of the Jefferson Davis Association at Rice University enriches Woodworth's study. He provides superb analyses of western military operations, as well as some stranger-than-fiction tales: Van Dorn's shocking death, John Hood and Sally Preston's bizarre romance, Gideon Pillow's undignified antics, and Franklin Cheatham's drunken battlefield behavior. Most important, he has avoided the twin temptations to glorify or castigate Davis and thus restored balance to the evaluation of his leadership during the Civil War.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780700605675
Publisher:
University Press of Kansas
Publication date:
06/28/1990
Series:
Modern War Studies Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
398
Sales rank:
1,091,193
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.89(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Table of Contents

Illustrations and Maps

Preface

Acknowledgments

1. The Man and the Hour

2. Organizing the Western Theater

3. Kentucky

4. The Coming of Albert Sidney Johnson

5. The Gateway to East Tennessee

6. Collapse

7. Shiloh

8. The Gibralter of the West

9. Bragg Moves North

10. Unified Command

11. Winter of Discontent

12. The Fall of Vicksburg

13. The Loss of Tennessee

14. To Atlanta and Beyond

15. The Commander in Chief

Notes

Bibliographic Essay

Index

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