Jeffersonian Democracy in New England

Jeffersonian Democracy in New England

by William Alexander Robinson
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally…  See more details below

Overview

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780837106397
Publisher:
Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated
Publication date:
04/30/1969
Series:
Yale Historical Publications Series
Pages:
190
Product dimensions:
5.91(w) x 9.06(h) x (d)

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER III THE GROWTH OF REPUBLICANISM, 1800-1807 In 1800 Jefferson wrote to Granger of Connecticut discussing the principles of the Republican party and commenting on its remarkable growth throughout the country. He then remarked, "Still, should the whole body of New England continue in opposition to these principles of government, either knowingly or through delusion, our government will be a very uneasy one."1 Two years later Fisher Ames was writing: "The federalists must entrench themselves in the State governments, and endeavor to make State justice and State power a shelter of the wise, and good, and rich, from the wild destroying rage of the Southern Jacobins. Such a post will be a high one, from which to combine in our favor the honest sentiments of New England at least. Public opinion must be addressed; must be purified from the dangerous errors with which it is infected; and, above all, must be roused from the prevailing apathy, the still more absurd and perilous trust in the moderation of the violent, and the tendency of revolution itself to liberty."2 The political history of New England from 1800 to 1815 was the story of the contest of these opposing ideas. As has been noted in discussing the elections of 1800, the Republicans had greater strength in Vermont and Rhode Island than elsewhere in New England. Theelections of 1801 gave further proof of this fact. Early in the spring the Columbian Centinel recorded that for some time Rhode Island had been "degenerating to its former 'Know Ye' grade" and had again "arrived at the nadir of politics."3 The Republicans secured a majority in the legislature and voted an address to President Jefferson.4 Republicanism hadconquered its first New England state. The President was aware of the significance of this event and on...

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >