Jenkins Continuous Integration Cookbook

Jenkins Continuous Integration Cookbook

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by Alan Berg
     
 

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If you are a Java developer, software architect, technical project manager, build manager, or development or QA engineer, this Cookbook is for you.

You should have a basic understanding of the Software Development Life Cycle and Java development, as well as a rudimentary understanding of Jenkins.

This book provides a problem-solution approach to some

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Overview

If you are a Java developer, software architect, technical project manager, build manager, or development or QA engineer, this Cookbook is for you.

You should have a basic understanding of the Software Development Life Cycle and Java development, as well as a rudimentary understanding of Jenkins.

This book provides a problem-solution approach to some common tasks and some uncommon tasks using Jenkins and is well-illustrated with practical code examples.

Jenkins Continuous Integration Cookbook includes problem solving and how to do recipes for many common and less common tasks. A wide range of topics are covered from integrating, securing, and maintaining Jenkins in your organization to writing your first extension.

The book begins with common maintenance tasks followed by securing Jenkins and enabling SSO. Then it explores the relationship between Jenkins builds and the Maven pom.xml. You will then learn ways to effectively communicate with various target audiences (developers, project managers, the public). You will then explore source code metrics with related recipes, and set up and run remote stress and functional tests. The book finally lists a series of 11 interesting plugins with a concluding recipe on how to create your first plugin.

Jenkins Continuous Integration Cookbook describes solutions and optimizations to problems commonly found.

Jenkins Continuous Integration Cookbook has over 90 recipes describing practical ways to use Jenkins and expanding its feature set by selective use of the best of breed plugins. Jenkins has a simple framework for writing plugins. There are over 400 plugins available. Therefore, it is easy to get lost in possibilities. Using practical recipes, this book will guide you through the complexities. The recipes are bundled into themes including security, maintainability, communication, building software, the valid use of code metrics, testing remotely, and writing your first plugin.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781849517409
Publisher:
Packt Publishing
Publication date:
04/28/2012
Pages:
344
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.72(d)

Meet the Author

Alan Mark Berg Bsc. MSc. PGCE, has for the last twelve years been the lead developer at the Central Computer Services at the University of Amsterdam. In his famously scarce spare time, he writes. Alan has a degree, two masters degrees, and a teaching qualification. He has also co-authored two books about Sakai (http://sakaiproject.org), a highly successful open source learning management platform used by many millions of students around the world. Alan has also won a Sakai Fellowship.

In previous incarnations, Alan was a technical writer, an Internet/Linux course writer, a product line development officer, and a teacher. He likes to get his hands dirty with the building and gluing of systems. He remains agile by ruining various development and acceptance environments.

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Jenkins Continuous Integration Cookbook 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Boudville More than 1 year ago
The Jenkins package is a worthy attempt to streamline and as much as possible automate the bookkeeping steps in doing software development. The latter has many implementations, as you probably well know. Like agile, or some other rapid application development protocol. What Jenkins is especially geared towards is the cycle of bug fixing. Chapter 2 is about security in Jenkins. But I'm guessing that this is a secondary consideration. If your team is developing within a private network, firewalled from the Internet, then you should focus on the rest of the book, which is actually about using Jenkins per se. Other parts of the book show compatibility with Maven, Ant and Groovy. Packages that are already highly in use. Commendably, the book warns that if you use Jenkins with Maven, not to put too much of the configuration commands into Jenkins, in order to build, test and deploy outside Jenkins. Since Maven can be well suited for that. The text gives a lengthy discussion of how to make the Maven pom.xml file be readable by Jenkins, for compatibility. For more advanced developers who have chosen to use Groovy, there are also examples. These involve more powerful commands, all encoded as XML. Certain sections of the book are really more about the use of Groovy and Maven, instead of Jenkins, and can be read as such. You also get indirect advice about abandoning Ant, as being too low level for current code development. Interestingly, some effort has gone into having Jenkins be able to do customised look and feel and to make its reports as understandable as possible. Hard core developers probably don't need any of this. But it is useful to upper management to see a consistent corporate branding.