Jenny Saville

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Overview

At thirty-two, Jenny Saville has had a career most artists twice her age would envy. In 1992, the year she completed her studies at Glasgow School of Art, her graduation exhibition sold out. Most notably, one painting was bought by Charles Saatchi and, since then, her international reputation has grown at a rapid and steady pace.Jenny Saville is described as a "New Old Master" for the technical proficiency of her oversize nudes that have earned her comparisons to Rubens and Lucian Freud and universal praise from ...
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Overview

At thirty-two, Jenny Saville has had a career most artists twice her age would envy. In 1992, the year she completed her studies at Glasgow School of Art, her graduation exhibition sold out. Most notably, one painting was bought by Charles Saatchi and, since then, her international reputation has grown at a rapid and steady pace.Jenny Saville is described as a "New Old Master" for the technical proficiency of her oversize nudes that have earned her comparisons to Rubens and Lucian Freud and universal praise from critics and art historians alike. For the conceptual underpinnings of her work, she has been hailed as one of the most interesting artists of the last decade. Her work has been shown alongside that of Damien Hirst and the other Young British Artists in the acclaimed and seminal survey of new British art Sensation at the Royal Academy (London, 1997) and the Brooklyn Museum of Art (New York, 2000).This is the only monograph devoted to the critically acclaimed young artist and features all of Jenny Saville's paintings to date-including many previously unpublished. This volume is being published in association with the Gagosian Gallery in London. The power of her brilliant and relentless embodiment of our worst anxieties about our own corporeality and gender is what distinguishes Saville from other paint-obsessed representers of the naked human body. To my eye, no other artist in recent memory has combined empathy and distance with such visual and emotional impact. -Linda Nochlin, Art in America, March 2000
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
British painter Saville has had a charmed career. As a student at the Glasgow School of Art, she sold out her graduation exhibit. (One of the paintings was bought by no less than Charles Saatchi.) At 27, she was included in the acclaimed (and, in New York City, notorious) Sensation show. And now, at 35, she is widely chatted about as one of Britain's most important young artists. One look at this gorgeous monograph, Saville's first, proves that all this success is well earned. Arranged chronologically, with paintings from 1992 to 2005, the volume reveals that though Saville's subject matter has hardly changed, her use of paint has evolved by leaps and bounds. Like Lucian Freud, Saville's fascinated with the body and the pigmentation of flesh, but her visions of it are both darker and brighter than his. Many of her paintings feature bodies that have been manipulated or damaged-by gender-changing plastic surgery, say, or by burns-but her rendering of these states is brilliantly colored. And in the most recent paintings ("Stare," "Passage," "Torso 2") the subject is set against a background of warm, Mediterranean blue that heightens both the images' beauty and their capacity to unnerve. Schama's interview with Saville-the best of the texts included here-provides insight into the artist's methods and her ambition to keep improving technically ("I can barely look at the earlier paintings I made"), while the many photographs of her studio, drafts and source material show the ordinary-looking origins of her work, and the many close-shots record her expressionist use of paint. While no book can convey the power of Saville's oversize canvases, this well-composed volume provides an illuminating survey of her work. (Nov.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
This visually striking volume presents the work of Jenny Saville, a young British painter who has been acclaimed by such well-known art/culture critics and historians as Gray (European thought, London Sch. of Economics; Two Faces of Liberalism), Linda Nochlin, David Sylvester, and Simon Schama (art history & history, Columbia Univ.; Rembrandt's Eyes), each of whose short essays about the artist are included in the book. Full-page reproductions of Saville's paintings, extreme closeups, partial studio shots, and bits of her sketches and notes make up most of the volume, which will fascinate some readers and disturb others, since Saville's work concentrates on images of surgery, injury, deformation, and grotesque oversize representations of human bodies. As Gray says of her paintings, "They point to areas of experience that ordinary experience struggles to close off." This is the first full-length monograph devoted to Saville's work and includes all of her exhibited canvases to date. Recommended for public and academic libraries and specialized collections focusing on contemporary art.-Kathryn Wekselman, M.Ln., Cincinnati Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780847827572
  • Publisher: Rizzoli
  • Publication date: 11/8/2005
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 673,683
  • Product dimensions: 11.15 (w) x 12.32 (h) x 0.92 (d)

Table of Contents

The landscape of the body : Ballard, Bacon, and Saville, London, May 2005 8
Migrants, New York, March 2003 11
Areas of flesh, London, January 1994 14
Interview with Jenny Saville, New York, May 2005 124
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2005

    Despite all the flaws of the book, Saville's Importance Rings True

    Jenny Saville is a big painter! Probably one of the few painters in history whose career was launched at her finals show form art school, Saville has established herself as one of the more exciting figurative artists of our time. Right up there with Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud in her ability to splash daring observations and passions on huge canvases, she has already establish a 'look' that is unmistakable. Not that Saville was the first painter to dwell on the massively/morbidly obese female (Freud's 'carcasses' were startlingly new, Haneline Rogeberg has painted the full figured female for years, etc), but her superimposition of surgical alteration and disease states together with the painterly style of describing flesh are startling and awe inspiring. Placing multiple figures together ('Fulcrum') or conjoined or simply overloading the capacity of a sitter's stool emphasizes the magnitude of her thoughts on her very large canvases. Many people are grumbling about the design of the book and the paucity of completed works and to an extent this is reason for concern. The four essays may be old to those who have followed her career, but to those to whom Jenny Saville is a discovery these four writings do add depth to understanding her skyrocketing rise to fame. It is terrific to see photographs of the materials in her studio that have inspired her paintings: drawings, surgical photographs of liposuction, trauma victims, deformity correction, disease states, transgender patients and notes all add to the atmosphere of the studio where she works. Perhaps the next monograph, and there surely will be one as Saville continues to grow and mature, will give us more new work. Until then at least we have a large book that congregates the bulk of her work and for that we should be grateful! Recommended. Grady Harp

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