Jersey Shore: Vintage Images of Bygone Days
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Jersey Shore: Vintage Images of Bygone Days

by Emil Salvini
     
 

This lavishly illustrated history of “the Shore” chronicles the people and events that shaped the physical, economic, and social development of New Jersey’s coastal resort communities. Packed with archival photos, this charming tribute to bygone days recaptures the glory days of the boardwalks, the spectacles of parades and festivals, the drama of

Overview

This lavishly illustrated history of “the Shore” chronicles the people and events that shaped the physical, economic, and social development of New Jersey’s coastal resort communities. Packed with archival photos, this charming tribute to bygone days recaptures the glory days of the boardwalks, the spectacles of parades and festivals, the drama of the coast’s worst storms, and many other aspects of life on the Shore. Enjoy seeing everything from the heyday of Atlantic City to the Methodist camps to the plunging neckline that made Marilyn Monroe persona non grata. Jersey Shore is a treasured keepsake for the area’s 14 million annual visitors and for the millions more with fond summertime memories.

Editorial Reviews

For millions of Jersey baby boomers the words "the Shore" evoke images of lazy boardwalk strolls; amusement park rides; cotton candy and salt water taffy; and, yes, sunburned arms and noses. Boardwalk Memories author Emil Salvini refuses to relinquish these splendid memories; in fact, he nurtures them each year when he summers in Cape May. A lavishly illustrated history of New Jersey ocean coastline; obviously a labor of love.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780762740956
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
05/22/2008
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
203
Sales rank:
1,321,473
Product dimensions:
7.10(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.70(d)

Read an Excerpt

Transportation“Are we there yet?” This timeless traveler’s incantation probably began when the first hardy souls took a trip to the Jersey Shore via what were known at the end of the eighteenth century as “jersey or shore wagons.” These were wagons that traversed the winding, primitive dirt roads that connected Philadelphia and New York City with the Atlantic Ocean. Although their primary purpose was to carry sea products to market, enterprising drivers would “haul” human cargo to the fledgling seaside resorts for a price. A trip by wagon was an arduous one, inspiring one poet to write, “…every bone is aching, after the shaking.”One woman who traveled by coach in 1835 described the New Jersey road her driver took as the "wickedest that ever was" and the coach as a “nefarious black hole on wheels.” There was no such thing as speed. Another Jersey traveler in 1833 who took a 34-mile horse-drawn railway trip noted that it took four hours and that every hour the horses had to be changed for a fresh team. Because of the arduous, uncomfortable conditions associated with land travel, a voyage by water was more desirable, and the resorts that could capitalize on this fact became the winners in the first half of the nineteenth-century. On July 1, 1854 the first train to Absecon Island, now named Atlantic City, arrived with just eleven passengers from Philadelphia, via Camden. The Camden and Atlantic Railroad had been a dream of a local country doctor named Jonathan Pitney who realized that Absecon was just sixty miles from Philadelphia and that a new city by the sea would tap into Cape May’s lucrative market. It took Pitney years to convince investors to listen but eventually he did, and fortunes were made on his railroad to nowhere. The new railroad did not offer luxury at first but it did offer speed. Cape May could boast of a long pedigree, but it could not compete with the one and a half-hour trip from Philadelphia to Atlantic City that was possible by rail by 1877. The railroad opened vacation travel to trainloads of lower-middle class and upper-lower-class semiprofessionals who could now afford a summer vacation. For the first time it was possible to spend a day at the beach and be back home the same day.

Meet the Author

Emil R. Salvini is a member of the Cape May City Historic Preservation Commission, past president of the North Jersey Highlands Historical Society, and a life member of the Cape May County Historical Society. Author of several books on New Jersey history, including Globe Pequot's Boardwalk Memories (2005), this Harvard Business School alum lives with his wife in Wayne, New Jersey, and spends summers in Cape May. Salvini is president of Wheal-Grace in Belleville, New Jersey; he has more than 25 years experience in the printing industry. He is the creator of Greenprint.com and is an FSC (Forest Stewartship Council) approved printer.

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