Jesse Jackson: A Voice for Change

Jesse Jackson: A Voice for Change

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by Steve Otfinoski
     
 

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The story of the rise to prominence of America's most influential black leader. Join Jesse on his extraordinary journey across the American political landscape -- from his days as a young civil rights activist working with Martin Luther King, Jr., to his two riveting campaigns for president.

From the Trade Paperback edition.See more details below

Overview

The story of the rise to prominence of America's most influential black leader. Join Jesse on his extraordinary journey across the American political landscape -- from his days as a young civil rights activist working with Martin Luther King, Jr., to his two riveting campaigns for president.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-- Four readable, fast-moving biographies. All are well-written and objective, pointing out the weaknesses as well as the considerable strengths of their subjects. Each contains a few photographs and a bibliography (of mostly adult books), but lacks an index or chronology of events. Thomas Edison covers his entire life but is mostly concerned with the years preceding his development of the incandescent light bulb. Mintz presents Edison as a genius whose single-minded obsession with his work caused him to be a difficult person to live and work with at times. By describing the more colorful aspects of his personality, the book is more interesting than Lampton's Thomas Alva Edison (Watts, 1988), but it lacks the numerous photographs that grace Lampton's book. Both Jesse Jackson and Martin Luther King, Jr. describe the social climate that produced the civil rights movement in the 50s and 60s. Otfinoski includes Jackson's controversial remarks during the presidential campaign and his friendship with Black Muslim Louis Farrakhan, but shows him as a gifted and complex man of vision and character. Quayle's Martin Luther King, Jr., while less impressive than Jakoubek's Martin Luther King, Jr. (Chelsea, 1989), is an acceptable book that can help meet the demand for biographies about King. Amelia Earhart stresses Earhart's feminism and compassion. While presenting the various theories about her disappearance, Sloate seems to favor the idea that Earhart was taken prisoner by the Japanese and possibly that she survived to live a quiet life with another identity. Such speculation makes fascinating reading, but some may favor the more cautious approach of Lauber's Lost Star (Scholastic, 1988), which also contains superior photographs and a much-needed map. All of the authors have succeeded in conveying the forceful personalities of their subjects as well as describing their achievements and places in modern history. --Jean H. Zimmerman, Willett School, South River, NJ

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307775849
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
12/29/2010
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
128
File size:
3 MB

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