Jet Age: The Comet, the 707, and the Race to Shrink the World [NOOK Book]

Overview

The captivating story of the titans, engineers, and pilots who raced to design a safe and lucrative passenger jet.

In Jet Age, journalist Sam Howe Verhovek explores the advent of the first generation of jet airliners and the people who designed, built, and flew them. The path to jet travel was triumphal and amazingly rapid-less than fifty years after the Wright Brothers' first flight at Kitty Hawk, Great Britain led the world with the first ...
See more details below
Jet Age: The Comet, the 707, and the Race to Shrink the World

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.99
BN.com price

Overview

The captivating story of the titans, engineers, and pilots who raced to design a safe and lucrative passenger jet.

In Jet Age, journalist Sam Howe Verhovek explores the advent of the first generation of jet airliners and the people who designed, built, and flew them. The path to jet travel was triumphal and amazingly rapid-less than fifty years after the Wright Brothers' first flight at Kitty Hawk, Great Britain led the world with the first commercial jet plane service. Yet the pioneering British Comet was cursed with a tragic, mysterious flaw, and an upstart Seattle company put a new competitor in the sky: the Boeing 707 Jet Stratoliner. Jet Age vividly recreates the race between two nations, two global airlines, and two rival teams of brilliant engineers for bragging rights to the first jet service across the Atlantic Ocean in 1958.

At the center of this story are great minds and courageous souls, including Sir Geoffrey de Havilland, who spearheaded the development of the Comet, even as two of his sons lost their lives flying earlier models of his aircraft; Sir Arnold Hall, the brilliant British aerodynamicist tasked with uncovering the Comet's fatal flaw; Bill Allen, Boeing's deceptively mild-mannered president; and Alvin "Tex" Johnston, Boeing's swashbuckling but supremely skilled test pilot. The extraordinary airplanes themselves emerge as characters in the drama. As the Comet and the Boeing 707 go head-to-head, flying twice as fast and high as the propeller planes that preceded them, the book captures the electrifying spirit of an era: the Jet Age.

In the spirit of Stephen Ambrose's Nothing Like It in the World, Verhovek's Jet Age offers a gorgeous rendering of an exciting age and fascinating technology that permanently changed our conception of distance and time, of a triumph of engineering and design, and of a company that took a huge gamble and won.


Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Richard B. Woodward
Mr. Verhovek's slender book might subordinate argument to fun facts, but he has a reporter's eye for an anecdote…Aviation scholars should look elsewhere. But less fussy readers en route to Frankfurt or Dubai should enjoy this trip back to the time of "Mad Men" aboard a miraculous invention too easily taken for granted.
—The New York Times
Michael Belfiore
…ostensibly about the race between two companies and nations to commercialize a military technology and define a new era of air travel…Jet Age is a page-turning detective story (what made the first jet airliner keep crashing?) with characters as finely drawn as those in a work of fiction, and infused with the infectious sense of wonder for heavier-than-air flight that drove ordinary men and women to reach for extraordinary heights. But the book is really about the risk-taking essential for making any extreme endeavor common­place. Jet Age celebrates the managers, pilots, engineers, flight attendants and, yes, even passengers (for without passengers there is no business) who gambled everything so that we might cross oceans and continents in hours rather than days.
—The New York Times Book Review
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101444399
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 10/14/2010
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 630,786
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Sam Howe Verhovek has been a reporter for The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times for more than twenty-five years. His assignments have taken him around the globe, to riots in India, the war in Iraq, and the longest school bus ride in America. He lives in Seattle.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface xiii

1 The de Havilland Comet 1

2 The Boeing 707 Jet Stratoliner 23

3 Dreamers and Aviators 37

4 Empires in the Sky 81

5 Ambassadors to the Air 111

6 The Comet Mystery 149

7 The Race to Shrink the World 179

Epilogue 211

Sources and Ackiwwledgments 217

Index 239

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 30, 2010

    Must Read...If You Wanna Know The Facts

    its a great book, a must read if you want to know the facts about the jet age. This book deecribes the 2 aircrafts that helped changed the world of air travel with great, its like you were the engineer, passenger, pilot, etc. of those 2 revolutionary book. A trult reliable and interesting book...a must read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 17, 2011

    Ausome book

    Wgsgrhdcygsgfdvsgvdghdrgdfdtdcfbdhffhfdsgddgwgdevegegyjdhvhvggbfnrbrfjhffvhnfgnvhvfjbchbcgjgdhkgdhnchhvhjggjgdhhfhvhcjvbnbggfjgnfghdbgbvbfhcgbfhgdhvghhdggfhfgdgghhdbhjfgkbguvvygjjbgjgjuhjj

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 4, 2011

    If you want to go beyond the Wright Brothers, this book is for you

    The subtitle for this book is "The Comet, the 707 and the Race to Shrink the World" and it is very interesting because this is not about the story of aviation as we are used to. Sure, it mentions the Wright brothers, Samuel Langley and Glenn Curtiss in passing but this is not about them. It is about what happened thanks to them.

    Even though the stories about the Comet and the 707 are well taught, they rarely intersect. It is as if it were two different books about the same subject. That would be the only weakness I found.

    The author talks about fascinating facts during his story. We learn about several milestones in flying, including how Lawrence Sperry and Cynthia Curtis became the founding members of the Mile-High club, among others. We learn about the story behind the creation of flight attendants, how airplane food was bad from the very beginning and many other milestones that we take for granted these days.

    Verhovek tells some fascinating stories that force you to run to YouTube in order to learn more. I invite you to check out how test pilot Tex Johnston did a roll with a 707 during an exhibit in Seattle and how the "Gossamer Albatross" became the first human-powered airship to cross the English Chanel cementing the idea that human power flight is just not feasible and why.

    If you like the history of aviation and want to look beyond the Wright brothers, this book will certainly assist you in understanding the transition from the nostalgic old propeller days planes to the jet age in which we live today.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2010

    An Enjoyable but Quick Read on a Big Subject

    I vaguely knew about the key players involved in the race to create the passenger jets we now take for granted, and Mr. Verhovek is a very good writer who gets all of them on stage and keeps the reader interested. That said, the book left me wanting more. In reading it seems more like a long magazine article padded out to a barely acceptable book length, a feeling reinforced by frequent repetitions of information that Mr. Verhovek has already well covered, while 20 of the 176 pages are "Sources and Acknowledgments" and the "Index." Still, a very good introduction to the subject; as Mr. Verhoven notes, there are a lot of other books on the topic out there.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)