Jewels: A Secret History

Jewels: A Secret History

by Victoria Finlay

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Throughout history, precious stones have inspired passions and poetry, quests and curses, sacred writings and unsacred actions. In this scintillating book, journalist Victoria Finlay embarks on her own globe-circling search for the real stories behind some of the gems we prize most. Blending adventure travel, geology, exciting new research, and her own irresistible

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Throughout history, precious stones have inspired passions and poetry, quests and curses, sacred writings and unsacred actions. In this scintillating book, journalist Victoria Finlay embarks on her own globe-circling search for the real stories behind some of the gems we prize most. Blending adventure travel, geology, exciting new research, and her own irresistible charm, Finlay has fashioned a treasure hunt for some of the most valuable, glamorous, and mysterious substances on earth.

With the same intense curiosity and narrative flair she displayed in her widely-praised book Color, Finlay journeys from the underground opal churches of outback Australia to the once pearl-rich rivers of Scotland; from the peridot mines on an Apache reservation in Arizona to the remote ruby mines in the mountains of northern Burma. She risks confronting scorpions to crawl through Cleopatra’s long-deserted emerald mines, tries her hand at gem cutting in the dusty Sri Lankan city where Marco Polo bartered for sapphires, and investigates a rumor that fifty years ago most of the world’s amber was mined by prisoners in a Soviet gulag.

Jewels is a unique and often exhilarating voyage through history, across cultures, deep into the earth’s mantle, and up to the glittering heights of fame, power, and wealth. From the fabled curse of the Hope Diamond, to the disturbing truths about how pearls are cultured, to the peasants who were once executed for carrying amber to the centuries-old quest by magicians and scientists to make a perfect diamond, Jewels tells dazzling stories with a wonderment and brilliance truly worthy of its subjects.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for Victoria Finlay’s Color

“The writing elegant and precise, and with at least one new and fascinating revelation on every single page . . . I could not be more enthusiastic.”
–Simon Winchester, author of A Crack in the Edge of the World

“Color is the essence of landscape, of mood, of our whole perception of the physical world. Victoria Finlay has traveled through Iran, Afghanistan, and other places to investigate the origin of all those tantalizingly sensual ochers and reds and blues. What a creative idea for a book!”
–Robert D. Kaplan, author of Imperial Grunts

“In this engaging travelogue, a rainbow of hues determined the author’s choice of destinations. . . . By the time you read ‘Violet,’ you will have traversed much of the world, sharing Finlay’s contagious fascination with color.”
–Condé Nast Traveler

“A rainbow of stories . . . even casual natural history fans can enjoy Finlay’s conversational style and her enthusiasm.”
–Chicago Tribune

Publishers Weekly
Gems seem to be moving to the literary forefront, with The Hope Diamond out in May and The Heartless Stone: A Journey through the World of Diamonds, Deceit and Desire due in August. In her follow-up to Color, Finlay looks at diamonds and eight more of the world's most coveted gemstones. In each chapter, she discusses the jewel's history and travels to the stone's place of origin: abandoned emerald mines in Egypt, working opal mines in Australia, a pearl-fisher's home in Scotland and an Apache reservation that holds most of the world's supply of peridot. Finlay is also fascinated by the lengths to which people will go to fabricate jewels: one company manufactures diamonds from cremated human remains. While each journey holds its own charms-Finlay's trek to Sri Lanka to uncover the pedigree of a family heirloom sapphire is particularly enjoyable-they don't fully gel into a cohesive whole, and detailed stories about, say, the way one Japanese entrepreneur transformed the world's pearl market are juxtaposed with historical trivia. Still, Finlay's winning personality may well be enough to keep readers turning the pages. 8 pages of color and b&w illus. throughout. (Aug.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Part travelog, part history, Finlay's book tracks the circuitous path of some of the world's precious and not-so-precious gems through history. Using the Mohs scale of mineral hardness, the author chose ten gemstones, ranging from the softest, jet, to the hardest, diamond. Each section is a hodgepodge, detailing the author's worldwide travel, from Europe to Sri Lanka, in pursuit of a particular gem's origin, history, and current market status. Finlay also describes her encounters with locals, including a Scottish pearl fisher and gem market traders in India. The last section contains jewel trivia, discussions of famous diamonds (including the Hope Diamond), and a gem glossary. Rather than examining the study or science of gems, this work, like her Color: A Natural History, feels a bit like journalist George Plimpton's writings about his forays into professional sports, although less self-aware. Her opening and closing remarks about the stones in her own engagement ring are somewhat disconcerting. Recommended, with reservations, for public libraries. (Illustrations not seen.)-Regina M. Beard, Kansas State Univ. Libs., Manhattan Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Some engaging stories in an ultimately unsatisfying investigation of nine precious stones. In her 2003 debut, Color, arts journalist Finlay took readers on a tour of the palette. Now she takes the same tack with jewels, collecting the natural and social (if not exactly "secret") history of gems, ranging from pearls to jet to rubies. The cleverest aspect of this book is its organization. Finlay's table of contents follows Mohs' scale of relative mineral hardness; she begins with oh-so-soft amber and concludes with the hardest stone, the diamond. As in Color, she travels all over the world to get her story: to Scotland to interview a retired pearl-fisher; to Egyptian deserts in search of emeralds; to Sri Lanka on the trail of sapphires; to Rangoon, where she attends the Myanmar Gems Emporium. The two most fascinating chapters examine opals and diamonds. In the former, Finlay tells the story of a cat skeleton that turned into opal and interviews a gem specialist named Len Cram, who has developed a new theory about how opals are formed. The diamond chapter includes the history of the Hope Diamond. For years, it was rumored to be cursed, but it was jeweler Pierre Cartier who actually concocted that tale to help get the hulking diamond sold. Finlay also reveals the history of the phrase "a diamond is forever" and credits the De Beers company with popularizing the diamond engagement ring. Many sparkling anecdotes about jewels.

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Random House Publishing Group
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5.53(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.04(d)

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"In the sea of the changeable winds, his merchants fished for pearls. In the sea where the North Star culminates, they fished for yellow amber."

-Inscription on an obelisk erected by a king of Nineveh

"If the insect could speak it would certainly have modified all the knowledge about the history of the distant past."

-Immanuel Kant, on seeing a fly trapped in amber.

In the ancient Cheddar Gorge of Somerset in England, there is a huge cavern. Since it was first discovered more than a century ago it has yielded many rare artifacts and bones from the ancient past, including even a complete seated skeleton, nine thousand years old. But in 1950 this place, named "Gough's Cave" after the Victorian sea captain who found it, also yielded what is perhaps the oldest piece of traded gem-type material ever discovered. It is dark red and rather dirty, like a scuffed piece of translucent toffee, and it is almost the size of a dozen credit cards stacked together.It is a piece of amber and it was traded at least 12,500 years ago. It looks an unlikely treasure, but treasure it is because it is possibly the first indication we have today of a human fascination with amber that has lasted since prehistoric times.

At the time of its discovery there was no way to ascertain where the amber in Gough's Cave had come from-whether from Britain (some rare pieces of native amber had been found on the Isle of Wight)or farther afield. However, fourteen years later a professor at Vassar College in New York came up with the answer. Using dental equipment designed for tooth fillings, he ground up a tiny fragment of the amber, and then observed how it absorbed infrared light. He determined that it was of Baltic origin and was therefore around forty million years old.

This was no huge surprise: most of the world's amber is from the Baltic area of northern Europe. But how could the amber have gotten into Gough's Cave so long ago? Today a small amount of amber is washed up every year on eastern English beaches, but when the Gough's Cave piece arrived, Britain was still linked to the rest of Europe by a vast land bridge, which only disappeared around 8,500 years ago. Similarly, the Baltic was not a sea but a huge freshwater lake, and it remained enclosed by land until the North Sea crashed through Denmark around 5500 b.c. So, for that little piece of amber to travel the hundreds of miles from its place of origin to Somerset, it must have been carried there-by human hands.

Perhaps it was a one-off piece, kept in a pouch by a single long-distance migrant, but it is more likely, given the distance involved, that it got there in a complicated series of trades.The amber would have been handed from one early merchant to another, swapped for food, weapons, flints, or furs, and its presence in the Somerset cave was the earliest evidence of what would become an extensive trading network across Europe: the Amber Route.

To follow it back, we will travel east, across what are now the southern English counties, covered then with balmier forests and plains, and over the ancient land bridge into what is now northern France or the Netherlands, which were then on higher ground. We will continue into northern Germany, then farther north toward Denmark, or perhaps east to the extended flatlands of the Vistula delta in Poland, which for thousands of years has been the most productive source of amber in the world. Amber trading happened here in such a frenzy that it has been said to have hastened the arrival of the Bronze Age in Baltic Europe. And in addition to the piece found in Gough's Cave, there is evidence in ancient tombs and caves all over Europe, and even in North Africa and the Middle East, that Baltic amber traveled for many miles, from Stone age times to now. The height of its mystery was the time of the ancient Greeks, who said that King Menelaus' palace was lined with it, and it was almost equal in its magnificence to the Kingdom of Heaven.

But why? Nowadays amber is often seen as a poor cousin to the other treasures of the jewel box. It tends to be light, soft, cheap, and not very rare at all. But accident, history, and some remarkable physical qualities have meant that it has sometimes been valued more highly than gold. It so intrigued early physicists that they named one of the most extraordinary natural phenomena in the universe after it; and in its time it has inspired treasure-seekers, dictators, thieves, crusaders, scientists, madmen, and filmmakers. For some it has been a proof of God's existence; for others it has confirmed the reverse.

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