Jewish Holiday Cooking: A Food Lover's Treasury of Classics and Improvisations

Jewish Holiday Cooking: A Food Lover's Treasury of Classics and Improvisations

by Jayne Cohen
     
 

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In Jewish Holiday Cooking, Jayne Cohen shares a wide-ranging collection of traditional Jewish recipes, as well as inventive new creations and contemporary variations on the classic dishes.  For home cooks, drawing from the rich traditions of Jewish history when cooking for the holidays can be a daunting task.  Jewish Holiday Cooking

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Overview

In Jewish Holiday Cooking, Jayne Cohen shares a wide-ranging collection of traditional Jewish recipes, as well as inventive new creations and contemporary variations on the classic dishes.  For home cooks, drawing from the rich traditions of Jewish history when cooking for the holidays can be a daunting task.  Jewish Holiday Cooking comes to the rescue with recipes drawn from Jayne Cohen's first book, The Gefilte Variations — called an "outstanding debut" by Publisher's Weekly — as well as over 100 new recipes and information on cooking for the holidays.  More than just a cookbook, this is the definitive guide to celebrating the Jewish holidays.  Cohen provides practical advice and creative suggestions on everything from setting a Seder table with ritual objects to accommodating vegan relatives.  The book is organized around the major Jewish holidays and includes nearly 300 recipes and variations, plus suggested menus tailored to each occasion, all conforming to kosher dietary laws.  Chapters include all eight of the major Jewish holidays — Shabbat, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Sukkot, Hanukkah, Purim, Passover, and Shavuot — and the book is enlivened throughout with captivating personal reminiscences and tales from Jewish lore as well as nostalgic black and white photography from Cohen's own family history.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Cohen (The Gefilte Variations) celebrates both the variety and spirit of Jewish holidays and the variety of Jewish cooking in this appealing book. Each major holiday throughout the year, from Rosh Hashanah in the fall to Shavuot in early summer, has its own section of recipes, as does the weekly Sabbath; strictly observant Jews as well as those who are not entirely familiar with the religious significance of all the events will appreciate Cohen's detailed comments on their history and meaning at the beginning of each section. Those with less experience in planning big feasts will also be grateful for the variety of menu suggestions that accompany each holiday: Passover seders, a Hanukkah latke party with superb traditional and nontraditional latkes, a vegetarian dinner for Sukkot. Cohen draws on Jewish cuisine from every tradition: Leek Croquettes from Rhodes, stuffed chicken soup from Iran and a pineapple-coconut milk kugel from Bombay are just a few of the pleasantly exotic yet authentic offerings; she also puts new twists on old standards, as with Moroccan-flavored brisket and "deconstructed" kasha varnishkes that feature portobello mushrooms and eggplant in lieu of quantities of fat. Each recipe is helpfully coded to indicate whether it is meat, dairy or pareve, though she often provides variations to accommodate all needs in this book that's enjoyable to read and inspiring to cook from. (Mar.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
School Library Journal

This large and informative book by Cohen (The Gefilte Variations) is arranged by the Jewish calendar, starting with recipes and menus for Rosh Hashanah and ending with Shavuot, along with suggestions for weekly Sabbath meals. Cooking from scratch is the point here, although a food processor does speed things up somewhat. There is also a detailed introduction and information on the "Jewish kitchen," including what makes meat kosher and discussions of other ingredients. A glossary and list of web sites and sources are included at the end. The layout is somewhat confusing, though, with similar items under different holidays. Thus, there are several variations on kugel, the sweet or savory noodle pudding, scattered throughout. The recipes themselves sound delicious, with many interesting options augmenting traditional favorites. Purchase where there is interest; a great addition to a holiday-themed display.
—Susan Hurst Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

From the Publisher
Part cookbook, part memoir and part how-to, "Jewish Holiday Cooking" could be the one go-to guide for all the Jewish holidays. Jayne Cohen gives the "why" behind their traditions and foods. Her Passover chapter is particularly detailed, tracing the development of the seder over the centuries, defining what "kosher for Passover" means, and giving ideas for planning the seder menu—including a vegetarian seder. Recipes for Passover include braised brisket with 36 garlic cloves and a chicken soup with fennel matzo balls, asparagus and shiitake mushrooms. Cohen is a graceful, informative writer who easily shares her enthusiasm for Jewish holiday cooking with readers. But there's a note of urgency as well. "Jewish cooking is above all bubbe (grandmother) cuisine, and through the meals that we share with our children, it is also our link to the future," she writes. "But unless you continue to update the recipes and create new food traditions, grandmother cuisine will die out when the grandmothers die, when no younger generations are eager to learn to prepare these foods." Sobering words, but this book offers delicious ways to honor traditions old and new.—Bill Daley, Chicago Tribune

Cohen (The Gefilte Variations) celebrates both the variety and spirit of Jewish holidays and the variety of Jewish cooking in this appealing book. Each major holiday throughout the year, from Rosh Hashanah in the fall to Shavuot in early summer, has its own section of recipes, as does the weekly Sabbath; strictly observant Jews as well as those who are not entirely familiar with the religious significance of all the events will appreciate Cohen's detailed comments on their history and meaning at the beginning of each section. Those with less experience in planning big feasts will also be grateful for the variety of menu suggestions that accompany each holiday: Passover seders, a Hanukkah latke party with superb traditional and nontraditional latkes, a vegetarian dinner for Sukkot. Cohen draws on Jewish cuisine from every tradition: Leek Croquettes from Rhodes, stuffed chicken soup from Iran and a pineapple-coconut milk kugel from Bombay are just a few of the pleasantly exotic yet authentic offerings; she also puts new twists on old standards, as with Moroccan-flavored brisket and "deconstructed" kasha varnishkes that feature portobello mushrooms and eggplant in lieu of quantities of fat. Each recipe is helpfully coded to indicate whether it is meat, dairy or pareve, though she often provides variations to accommodate all needs in this book that's enjoyable to read and inspiring to cook from. (Mar.) (Publishers Weekly, December 17, 2007)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780544187030
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
09/26/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
592
Sales rank:
152,903
File size:
2 MB

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