Jews, God and History

Jews, God and History

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by Max I. Dimont
     
 

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How have the Jews survived through so many millennia while other civilizations have declined and perished? What qualities mark the culture that has produced Moses, Christ, Spinoza, Marx, Freud, and Einstein? From ancient Palestine through Europe and the Orient, to America and modern Israel, Max I. Dimont shows how the saga of the Jews is interwoven with the story

Overview

How have the Jews survived through so many millennia while other civilizations have declined and perished? What qualities mark the culture that has produced Moses, Christ, Spinoza, Marx, Freud, and Einstein? From ancient Palestine through Europe and the Orient, to America and modern Israel, Max I. Dimont shows how the saga of the Jews is interwoven with the story of virtually every nation on earth. This is a tale of a people escaping annihilation, fighting, falling back, advancing—a lively and fascinating look at how the Jews have contributed to humankind’s spiritual and intellectual heritage in remarkable ways, and across a remarkable span of history.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“More interesting than the facts Dimont has collected…is the fascinating reasoning of a bright and unorthodox mind.”—San Francisco Sunday Examiner & Chronicle

“A book of life and hope. There are few greater documents to the vitality and perseverance of Man than this history of the Jews.”—St. Louis Post-Dispatch

“Done with warmth and vitality. Written for laymen by a scholarly layman who has a passion for his theme.”—Max Lerner

“By far the liveliest popular history of the Jewish people that I have ever read. In many ways, a strikingly original synthesis of Jewish history.”—Richard B. Morris, author of The Forging of the Union, 1781–1789 and Witnesses at the Creation

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780451146946
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/01/1964
Pages:
1
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 5.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Max I. Dimont, author of The Indestructible Jews, The Jews in America, The Amazing Adventures of the Jewish People, and Appointment in Jerusalem, was born in Helsinki, Finland, and came to the United States in 1930. He taught himself English by reading Shakespeare’s plays, the Bible, and American plays translated into Finnish. After serving in intelligence with the U.S. Army during World War II, he worked in public relations and employee relations for Edison Brothers Stores in St. Louis. Following the first publication of the bestselling Jews, God and History, he lectured extensively on Jewish history throughout the United States, Canada, South Africa, Brazil, and Finland until his death in 1992.

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Jews, God, and History (50th Anniversary Edition) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
ShufMH More than 1 year ago
Max I. Dimont's "Jews, God and History" is the best history of the Jewish people. Encompassing 4,000 years of history, from approximately 2,000 B.C. through 1993, "Jews, God and History" is comprehensive in its facts, and magnificent in its prose. Dimont's writing is concise when it should be concise, expansive when it should be expansive, and always intelligent. Dimont's analysis is strikingly original and very sharp. If you care about Jewish history, or world history, you must read this book. Without reading this book, you will not know all of the contributions of the Jewish people to history. "Jews, God and History" is indispensable.
JosephCopeli More than 1 year ago
Jews, God and History is a phenomenal work which undertakes the difficult and tedious task of presenting the 4,000 year history of the Jewish people. Instead of presenting this history from an insulated point of view, author Max I. Dimont shows the history of the Jews in the context of the entire world; in the vast tapestry of human history on this planet, the Jewish people are shown to be a strand that makes its way through every corner of the fabric. Dimont immediately draws the attention of the reader in his introduction, musing about how such a small population of people have had such influence on the greater world. Some of the most influential people in history were Jews: Moses, Jesus, Paul, Baruch Spinoza, Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Albert Einstein. Two of the largest world religions, Christianity and Islam, grew out of Judaism. The Jews introduced to the world the concepts of monotheism, prayer, church, redemption, universal education and charity. Perhaps the most interesting idea that Dimont brings up in his introduction is the age of the Jewish civilization; whereas all the other pagan civilizations that existed at the time have long since disappeared, the Jews are still around today. Dimont goes on to say, "The Chinese, Hindu, and Egyptian peoples are the only ones living today who are as old as the Jewish people. But these three civilizations had only one main cultural period, and their impact on succeeding civilizations has not been great. They contained neither the seeds for their own rebirth nor the seeds for the birth of other civilizations. Unlike the Jews, they were not driven out of their countries, nor did they face the problem of survival in alien lands. The Greeks and the Romans are the only other nations which have influenced the history of Western man as profoundly as the Jews. But the people who now dwell in Greece and Italy are not the same as those who dwelt in ancient Hellas and Rome." Needless to say, these facts makes the reader wonder "what is so special about the Jews?" and Dimont makes his best effort to answer this question in the most scholarly way possible, even explaining eight different theories on interpreting history and how they apply to the Jewish people. Although Dimont uses the Bible as a source for his telling of early Jewish history, he makes it clear that he is approaching the material from a secular standpoint. On the subject of Abraham having a vision from God, Dimont states that the most important part of the encounter is not if God actually appeared to Abraham or if Abraham dreamed up the whole thing; what matters is that Abraham decided that he had a covenant with God, and his descendants continued to have that covenant. Dimont stresses that this point so important that Jewish history is built on it: the covenant that the Jews believed they had with God gave them the will to survive as Jews, which is a main reason why the Jewish people didn't simply disappear into the many civilizations they lived in throughout history. In the chapters where he describes the Jewish religion, Dimont really shines. He explains the beliefs, rituals and scholarship in a way that is both accurate and accessible to people completely new to the material. It is in these chapters that he describes a crucial moment in Jewish history: the shifting of the religion from sacrificial... [Due to BN.com's character limit, the rest of this review can be found at FingerFlow.com]
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great read to understand better our jewish history
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