Jews of South Florida

Overview

When we think of Jewish South Florida, we may think first of the generation of aging Jews who moved to South Beach from the 1940s to the 1970s to create a rich Yiddish culture on the shores of the Atlantic Ocean. Yet these “snowbirds” are just one group in what has become an increasingly diverse South Florida Jewish population. The tri-county area of Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach is home to a community of more than 625,000 Jews-—about --10 percent of American Jews—and comprises nearly 200 congregations, 3 ...
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Overview

When we think of Jewish South Florida, we may think first of the generation of aging Jews who moved to South Beach from the 1940s to the 1970s to create a rich Yiddish culture on the shores of the Atlantic Ocean. Yet these “snowbirds” are just one group in what has become an increasingly diverse South Florida Jewish population. The tri-county area of Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach is home to a community of more than 625,000 Jews-—about --10 percent of American Jews—and comprises nearly 200 congregations, 3 major Jewish federations, 20 Hebrew day schools, a world-recognized Holocaust memorial, and more. Yet no single book offers an overview of this vital Jewish community.

The South Florida Jewish community is distinguished from other Jewish communities in the U.S. by its diverse population. Like the post-war generation of snowbirds, tens of thousands of retirees (most from the Atlantic seaboard but some from cold climates elsewhere in the United States), currently live in “gated communities,” like Century Village in Boca Raton, and maintain strong ties with the communities they left behind. But the Jewish community in South Florida also has a distinctive Latin flavor, which began with the post-Castro migration of Cubans. Hispanic Jews have moved to South Florida from several Latin American nations, and these Spanish-speaking Jews have worked hard to maintain their cultural heritage even as they have adapted to life in the United States. South Florida is also home to the largest community of Holocaust survivors in the country. More recent Jewish immigrants from Arab nations, the Soviet Union, and Israel have added to the distinctive diversity of Jewish life in South Florida.

Jews of South Florida offers a history of the development of Jewish life in the region, from its modest start at the end of the nineteenth century to the beginning of the twenty-first century. Culture and Community, Part I, begins with demographic and historical overviews of Jewish settlement in South Florida. Essays in this section examine diverse Jewish populations: Cuban Jews, Sephardic Jews, Jewish life in Broward County and Boca Raton, Jewish retirees on South Beach, and Holocaust survivors. Individuals and Institutions, Part II, contains essays on gangster Meyer Lansky and activist Rabbi Leon Kronish; a photo essay commemorating synagogues; essays on Jewish education in South Florida; the Greater Miami Chapter of the National Council of Jewish Women; and the Dora Teitelboim Center for Yiddish Culture, which strives to invigorate the waning Yiddish culture that once thrived on South Beach.

With more than 130 historical and contemporary photographs, this unique book offers a fascinating look at this tenacious, yet remarkably diverse, Jewish community.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Jews have had an important part to play in life in Florida, and these essays cover many aspects of that influence. The collection makes us sensitive to the many ways in which Jews have adapted to and influenced their surroundings. This is one of the better books I have read about a racial or ethnic group and the culture they brought to a new place."—Multicultural Review

"The Jews of South Florida is a valuable contribution toward knowledge of an area which has been relatively understudied and will, as its population grows, no doubt draw more scholarly attention in the future."
—American Jewish History

“This book, by means of a number of insightful articles and with the help of some wonderful photographs that have been selected from the archives of the South Florida Jewish museum, demonstrates that there is lots and lots of Jewish energy in this part of the country.”—South Florida Jewish Journal

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Product Details

Meet the Author

ANDREA GREENBAUM is Assistant Professor in the English Department at Barry University, Miami Shores. She has published several books including Insurrections: Approaches to Resistance in Composition Studies and The Emancipatory Movements (2001). She is co-editor of Judaic Perspectives in Composition Studies, forthcoming from Hampton Press.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction
Part I Culture and Community
Ten Percent of American Jews - Ira Sheskin
Alligators and Matzo Balls: A Historical Overview of the Florida Jewish Community - Marcia Kerstein Zerivitz
Blood and Sand: The Jewish Community of South Florida - Shephen J. Whifield
Anti-Semitism in Florida Culture - Henry Abramson
Cuban Jews in South Florida: Exile Redux - Stephen Benz
Sephardic Jews in South Florida - Annete B., Fromm
From Swamp to "Shayna Platz": Jewish Lfe in Broward County (Historical Photos from the Jewish Museum of Florida) - Marcia Kerstein Zerivitz
Jews of Boca Raton - Linda Brockman
Yiddishkeit in South Beach: "I want to Be With You to Sing My Songs"- Joel Saxe
Life on South Beach: A Photographic Portfolio - Gary Monroe
Part II Institutions
Jewish Gangsters Starring Meyer Lansky - Jack B. Moore
Leon Kronish: Miami Beach's Twentieth- Century Prophet - Henry A. Green
Synagogues in the Sand - Zev Ben Beichman
Jewish Education in South Florida - Susan Neimand
A History of the National Council of Jewish omen, Greater Miami Section - Joanie Glickstein
Yizkor: Survivor Narratives at the Miami Holocaust Memorial - Andrea Greenbaum
Behind the Cultural Facade: Yiddish Cultural Revival in Miami - David Weintraub
Contributor Biographies
Index
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