Jim Crow New York: A Documentary History of Race and Citizenship, 1777-1877

Overview

A Choice Outstanding Academic Title (2004)

In 1821, New York’s political leaders met for over two months to rewrite the state’s constitution. The new document secured the right to vote for the great mass of white men while denying all but the wealthiest African-American men access to the polls.

Jim Crow New York introduces students and scholars alike to this watershed event in American political life. This action crystallized the paradoxes of ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (4) from $12.00   
  • New (2) from $68.16   
  • Used (2) from $12.00   
Sending request ...

Overview

A Choice Outstanding Academic Title (2004)

In 1821, New York’s political leaders met for over two months to rewrite the state’s constitution. The new document secured the right to vote for the great mass of white men while denying all but the wealthiest African-American men access to the polls.

Jim Crow New York introduces students and scholars alike to this watershed event in American political life. This action crystallized the paradoxes of free black citizenship, not only in the North but throughout the nation: African Americans living in New York would no longer be slaves. But would they be citizens?

Jim Crow New York provides readers with both scholarly analysis and access to a series of extraordinary documents, including extensive excerpts from the resonant speeches made at New York’s 1821 constitutional convention and additional documents which recover a diversity of voices, from lawmakers to African-American community leaders, from newspaper editors to activists. The text is further enhanced by extensive introductory essays and headnotes, maps, illustrations, and a detailed bibliographic essay.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“The documents (the editors) have assembled give us many voices, both white and black. Among whites there are pioneers, men of very good will and demagogues worthy of Jim Crow Mississippi. The black voices they present are not the predictable Frederick Douglass and, perhaps, Henry Highland Garnet. Without asserting the point, they demonstrate that many black people were trying to speak for themselves.”
-Slavery and Abolition

“It would require a tremendous amount of time and expense to collect all the primary source material the authors have assembled and reprinted in this book. This in and of itself makes it a valuable resource for researchers.”
-New York History

“With so many document collections aimed at teaching scholars and students about slavery and race relations in the nineteenth-century South, it is refreshing and enlightening to read a collection that reminds us of the northern side of the story.”
-Michael Vorenberg,author of Final Freedom

“Gellman and Quigley provide a unique perspective. While invaluable for scholars of slavery and NYC, most importantly, students will find an invaluable window onto democracy's history in the US.”
-Choice

“A superb combination of documents, commentary, and narrative history. Gellman and Quigley explore the complex world of race and citizenship in New York State where the long history of conflict, accommodation, reversal, and progress foreshadowed the national debate on racial equality. Jim Crow New York is equally valuable for a scholar's reference and for the classroom.”
-Lois E. Horton,coauthor of In Hope of Liberty and Hard Road to Freedom

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780814731505
  • Publisher: New York University Press
  • Publication date: 6/1/2003
  • Pages: 353
  • Product dimensions: 6.36 (w) x 8.84 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

David N. Gellman is Associate Professor of History at DePauw University.

David Quigley is Associate Professor of History at Boston College.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
Pt. I Slavery, Abolition, and Citizenship, 1777-1817 13
Context 13
Chronology 19
Map 24
Documents 25
A Franchise Provision, New York State Constitution, 1777 25
B Veto Message, 1785 30
C Anti-Abolition Article, 1785 33
D "Mungo Speaks," 1788 36
E Antislavery Orations, 1797 and 1798 39
F Gradual Abolition Act, 1799 52
G African American Political Oration, 1809 56
H An Act Regulating Black Suffrage, 1811 64
I Act Declaring 1827 as the End of Slavery in New York, 1817 67
Pt. II The Convention of 1821 and the Politics of Disfranchisement 73
Context 73
Chronology 79
Map 80
Documents 81
J Connecticut Constitution Confirms Disfranchisement, 1818 81
K Resolution Opposing the Missouri Constitution, 1820 84
L Antiblack Article, National Advocate, 1821 87
M Extended Excerpts from the Convention of 1821 90
Pt. III The Long Reconstruction, 1821-1877 201
Context 201
Chronology 207
Map 211
Documents 212
N First African American Newspaper, 1827 212
O Emancipation Addresses, 1827 218
P Address, African American State Convention, 1840 236
Q Excerpts from the Debate on Suffrage, New York State Constitutional Convention, 1846 249
R Land Reform Proposal, 1846 260
S Declaration of Sentiments, Seneca Falls, 1848 265
T Anti-Property Qualification Pamphlet, 1860 271
U Report on Suffrage, New York State Constitutional Convention, 1867-1868 278
V Letter to the Editor: Elizabeth Cady Stanton on Sojourner Truth, 1867 286
W "Appeal to Christians," 1869 292
X Fifteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, 1870 295
Y Newspaper Coverage of First Equal Manhood Suffrage Election, 1870 300
Z Excerpts from Tilden Commission Report, 1877 307
Bibliographic Essay 319
Notes 331
Index 343
About the Editors 353
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)