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Jim Limber Davis: A Black Orphan in the Confederate White House
     

Jim Limber Davis: A Black Orphan in the Confederate White House

by Rickey Pittman, Judith Hierstein (Illustrator)
 

Jim Limber Davis was rescued from an abusive guardian by Varina Davis when he was only five years old. Later, Union soldiers kidnapped Jim Limber and spread cruel rumors that he was Jefferson Davis's slave. This true story provides a glimpse of how Jim was accepted as one of the Davis's children and reveals their family's love and compassion for him.

Overview

Jim Limber Davis was rescued from an abusive guardian by Varina Davis when he was only five years old. Later, Union soldiers kidnapped Jim Limber and spread cruel rumors that he was Jefferson Davis's slave. This true story provides a glimpse of how Jim was accepted as one of the Davis's children and reveals their family's love and compassion for him.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal

Gr 2-4
This is a heartbreaking tale of a free black orphan boy adopted by Jefferson Davis and his family. After Davis was arrested by the Union army, Jim was kidnapped and taken to the North as an unwilling example of the cruelties meted out by Davis to the boy. One illustration shows Jim exposing his welt-covered back to shocked Northerners. In reality, his scars were not from the beatings suffered under the Confederate president, but from the boy's uncle. Pittman does a terrific job of capturing readers' interest, but there are concerns about this title. First of all, thoughts and feelings, which cannot be known, are ubiquitous. When Jim's adopted brother dies after a fall, the text reads, "These were sad days for the Davis family, but especially for Jim because he loved Joe so much." Surely Mrs. Davis would have had her own particular, undeniable, maternal grief. There is so much speculation and filling in of unknown blanks. Large, average-quality illustrations evoke the author's sympathetic views toward the Davis family and the Confederacy. Without source notes, readers should view this story as fiction, not biography. The mystery of what happened to young Jim remains unknown. Davis searched for him after the Civil War, but never found him. Despite the above concerns, it is a worthy tale for young students.
—Anne Chapman CallaghanCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781589804357
Publisher:
Pelican Publishing Company, Incorporated
Publication date:
05/15/2007
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x (d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Rickey E. Pittman, 1998 Grand Prize winner of the prestigious Ernest Hemingway Short Story Competition, is an active member of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, Camp Thomas McGuire, in West Monroe, Louisiana. He is also a Civil War re-enactor, a public speaker on issues and topics related to the War Between the States, and a musician who travels and performs original and Civil War period music. Pittman lives with his wife in Bastrop, Louisiana, where he teaches
English at Bastrop High School and freshman composition at the University of Louisiana at Monroe. He is a proud father and grandfather.

A former elementary school teacher, Judith Hierstein now teaches high school graphic and media arts. She has illustrated several children's books for Pelican including the Toby Belfer Series and The American Revolution A to Z, Nathan's Hanukkah Bargain, Jim Limber Davis: A Black Orphan in the Confederate White House, and The Pilgrims' Thanksgiving from A to Z. She lives in Tuscon, Arizona.

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