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Jinx

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Overview

It's not easy being Jinx.

Jean Honeychurch hates her boring name (not Jean Marie, or Jeanette, just . . . Jean). What's worse? Her all-too-appropriate nickname, Jinx. Misfortune seems to follow her everywhere she goes—even to New York City, where Jinx has moved to get away from the huge mess she caused in her small hometown. Her aunt and uncle welcome her to their Manhattan town house, but her beautiful cousin Tory isn't so thrilled. . . .

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Jinx

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Overview

It's not easy being Jinx.

Jean Honeychurch hates her boring name (not Jean Marie, or Jeanette, just . . . Jean). What's worse? Her all-too-appropriate nickname, Jinx. Misfortune seems to follow her everywhere she goes—even to New York City, where Jinx has moved to get away from the huge mess she caused in her small hometown. Her aunt and uncle welcome her to their Manhattan town house, but her beautiful cousin Tory isn't so thrilled. . . .

In fact, Tory is hiding a dangerous secret—one that could put them all in danger. Soon Jinx realizes it isn't just bad luck she's been running from . . . and that the curse she has lived under since the day she was born may be the only thing that can save her life.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Jean, aka Jinx, has been a "bad luck magnet" since the moment she was born, when a freak thunderstorm caused a hospital blackout. Now, due to a vaguely described incident involving a stalker, she has moved from Iowa to stay with her aunt's family in a ritzy New York City townhouse. Jean's regular bad luck gets worse thanks to Tory, the snotty cousin who is now her classmate at an exclusive private school. After Jean mysteriously prevents a cute neighbor from a terrible accident, Tory is convinced that Jean is a witch-just like herself, and as proof she dredges up a story their grandmother used to tell about magic in their bloodline. Jean refuses to join Tory's coven, saying, "I don't think messing around with magic is such a good thing, you know" (though she soon performs a binding spell to prevent her cousin from hurting the family's au pair). Tension between the girls rises, causing Tory to ominously declare, "I have a very special thank-you I've been saving up, just for Jinx." With its assurance of a satisfying outcome despite the odds, predictability is a virtue in a Cabot (Princess Diaries) novel, and readers will guess most plot points, including the truth behind the stalking story. Readers will enjoy the premise and the naiveté of the heroine, and they'll wonder, as Jean does, how much magic is actually at play. The final supernatural showdown proves that Cabot can do harrowing just as well as she does pop romance. Ages 12-up. (Aug.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
KLIATT - Claire Rosser
Another entertaining, fluffy novel from Meg Cabot that will have appeal to those who like their chick lit mixed with some magic. Jinx is the name stuck to Jean, since things seem to go wrong around her. Jean has come from a little town in Iowa to live in Manhattan with her aunt and uncle and their children, including Jean's cousin Tory who thinks she is a witch...well, she thinks they both are witches. Tory is mean and nasty, living on the edge, while Jean (Jinx) is a bit naive, but kind and helpful. The girls both heard the same story from their grandmother, that the daughter of her daughter will inherit the family gift of being a witch. Jean only believes in good witchcraft, but doesn't want to acknowledge any part of it. Tory is using whatever she can use to hold power at the posh private school the girls attend. Also, Tory has a crush on their next-door neighbor, Josh, but he seems to want to hang out with Jean. Tory is trying spells to gain power over Josh. Jean is appalled, but even she is tempted to use witchcraft, at least to protect those she loves. The prom scene is memorable.
VOYA - Angelica Delgado
When Jean Honeychurch was born, a lightning storm made the hospital lights go out. This predicament was the first in a long line of events that Jean, nicknamed Jinx by her family, faces. One of those unfortunate situations forces Jinx to relocate to New York and spend the remainder of the school year with her aunt and uncle. When she arrives, she immediately accomplishes two things: She develops a crush on hot neighbor Zach and clashes with her cousin Tory, who brands her a preacher's-daughter-country-bumpkin from Iowa. When Jinx saves Zach from a freak accident, Tory believes that Jinx is a next-generation witch, foretold by their great-great-great-great grandmother Branwen, who was burned at the stake for witchcraft. Jean scoffs at the idea until visits to a local magic store and more altercations with Tory lead her to believe otherwise. Cabot, author of the Mediator and 1-800-WHERE-R-U series, creates yet another winner with her latest supernatural effort. Jinx is a heroine full of endearing self-doubt and likeability who juggles newly discovered powers along with familial relations and school politics. Popular culture references, a staple of Cabot's popular Princess Diaries series, are absent from this new novel, creating a more timeless read. Jinx shares that series' readability with quick, breezy segments that are easy for any reader to digest. Cabot's new novel will not leave fans disappointed.
Children's Literature - Vicki Foote
Teenager Jean is called Jinx because she seems to have more than her share of bad luck. This story takes place in Manhattan, where Jinx has been sent to stay with relatives. She is getting away from her home in Iowa because she has had some problems with a former boyfriend. Her stay in Manhattan leads to more problems, involving her cousin Tory, friends, and a new boyfriend. Jinx and Tory both wonder if they are witches, and the plot involves their attempts at witchcraft using dolls and stones. The mystery continues throughout as Jinx seeks to answer her questions about using magic while trying to avoid conflict with Tory. The plot turns more serious when Tory's jealousy becomes dangerous to Jinx. A satisfying ending ties up all the mysteries about the former boyfriend, Tory, and Jinx's new boyfriend. This entertaining story, written in first-person, has just the right touch of humor and suspense.
School Library Journal

Gr 6-9 -Jean Honeychurch hopes to leave her Iowa past-and her nickname, Jinx-behind when she moves to New York City to live with her aunt's family and finish her sophomore year in high school. But living in a Manhattan townhouse and attending a ritzy private school with her cousin Tory are not the Cinderella experiences she had anticipated. Glamorous Tory has been dabbling in witchcraft. Not the delightful stuff of Hogwarts, but the pentacle-and-coven variety that may unsettle conservative parents. The plot breezes along fairly predictably, with Tory's treachery, the cute boy next door, and a callous coterie. Although Jean's mother is a minister, the girl seems to have no spiritual or religious moorings when confronting evil. Amber Sealey's reading is competent with the ingénue voices, but Tory's character is read in one unrelenting smirk. The German au pair's accent is all over the map, and a character from Iowa has an inexplicable Southern accent. Meg Cabot fans may like this tale (HarperTeen, 2007), particularly if they fancy black magic, but others will be impatient with the cardboard characters and uninspired setting.-Julie Dahlhauser, Jackson Central-Merry High School, TN

Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Iowa preacher's daughter Jean (known universally as Jinx) has been shipped off to rich Manhattan cousins. Farm-fresh and country-sweet, Jinx is unprepared for the cynicism, substance abuse and sexual hijinks of bitchy cousin Tory. As children, Tory and Jinx were friends, but Tory's grown selfish and vicious. She'll befriend Jinx, but only if Jinx will practice black magic with her-and since it's a spell gone awry that got Jinx sent away from Iowa, magic is definitely off limits. Meanwhile, Jinx has fallen for Zach, the hot next-door neighbor who's her best friend in New York and the object of Tory's desires. Tory's paranoid selfishness leads her to non-magical but still-devastating viciousness, and it will take all Jinx's strength of will to remain unbowed. Highly idealized, Jinx is moral, smart and powerful; her only flaw is her low self-esteem. Zach is gorgeous, quick-witted and the shining light in a pack of amoral rich teens. While too-perfect Jinx isn't as compelling as Cabot's usual heroines, the fluffy gothic romance will keep her readers happy. (Fantasy. 12-14)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060837662
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 5/12/2009
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 433,648
  • Age range: 13 years
  • Product dimensions: 5.28 (w) x 8.02 (h) x 0.71 (d)

Meet the Author

Meg Cabot was born in Bloomington, Indiana. In addition to her adult contemporary fiction, she is the author of the bestselling young adult fiction series, The Princess Diaries. More than 25 million copies of her novels for children and adults have sold worldwide. Meg lives in Key West, Florida, with her husband.

Biography

Meg Cabot knows that one of the best cures for feeling gawky and conspicuous is reading about someone who sticks out even more than you do. Her books for young adults invariably feature girls who have extraordinary powers that carry extraordinary burdens. Cabot's Princess Diaries series offers up the secret thoughts of Mia Thermopolis, who discovers at age 14 that she is actually the princess of a small European country. This revelation adds significantly to her extant concerns about crushes, friendships, school, and other matters falling under adolescent scrutiny.

Cabot, a native of Indiana weaned on Judy Blume and Barbara Cartland, was already a successful romance novelist (as Patricia Cabot) before she began writing for young adults; her alter-alter ego, Jenny Carroll, began a new series shortly after The Princess Diaries debuted. The Carroll books are divided between the Mediator series, starring a girl who can communicate with restless ghosts; and the 1-800-WHERE-R-YOU books, in which a girl struck by lightning acquires the ability to locate missing people.

Cabot writes her books in a conspiratorial, first-person style that resonates with her readers. She has obviously kept a grip on the vernacular and the key issues of adolescence; but what makes her books so irresistible is the mixing of the mundane with the fantastic. After all, who wouldn't like to wake up and be a princess all of a sudden, or a seer? Cabot takes such offhand notions and roots them firmly in the details of average, middle-class American life. She has also tiptoed into mystery and paranormal suspense with other YA novels and series installments.

Cabot continues to write adult novels under various permutations of her given name (Meggin Patricia Cabot): from 19th-century historical romances to contemporary chick lit. And, as with her books for teens, these romances have earned praise for their lighthearted humor and well drawn characters.

Good To Know

Some interesting outtakes from our interview with Cabot:

"I am left handed."

"I hate tomatoes of any kind."

"I really wanted to be veterinarian, but I got a 410 on my math SATs."

"Writing used to be my hobby, but now that it's my job, I have no hobby -- except watching TV and laying around the pool reading US Weekly. I have tried many hobbies, such as knitting, Pilates, ballet, yoga, and guitar, but none of them have taken. So I guess I'm stuck with no hobby.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Meggin Patricia Cabot (full name); Patricia Cabot, Jenny Caroll
    2. Hometown:
      New York, New York
    1. Education:
      B.A. in fine arts, Indiana University, 1991
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Jinx (PLM)

Chapter One

The thing is, my luck's always been rotten. Just look at my name: Jean. Not Jean Marie, or Jeanine, or Jeanette, or even Jeanne. Just Jean. Did you know in France, they name boys Jean? It's French for John.

And okay, I don't live in France. But still. I'm basically a girl named John. If I lived in France, anyway.

This is the kind of luck I have. The kind of luck I've had since before Mom even filled out my birth certificate.

So it wasn't any big surprise to me when the cab driver didn't help me with my suitcase. I'd already had to endure arriving at the airport to find no one there to greet me, and then got no answer to my many phone calls, asking where my aunt and uncle were. Did they not want me after all? Had they changed their minds? Had they heard about my bad luck—all the way from Iowa—and decided they didn't want any of it to rub off on them?

But even if that were true—and as I'd told myself a million times since arriving at baggage claim, where they were supposed to have met me, and seeing no one but skycaps and limo drivers with little signs with everyone's names on them but mine—there was nothing I could do about it. I certainly couldn't go home. It was New York City—and Aunt Evelyn and Uncle Ted's house—or bust.

So when the cab driver, instead of getting out and helping me with my bags, just pushed a little button so that the trunk popped open a few inches, it wasn't the worst thing that had ever happened to me. It wasn't even the worst thing that had happened to me that day.

I pulled out my bags, each ofwhich had to weigh fifty thousand pounds, at least—except my violin case, of course—and then closed the trunk again, all while standing in the middle of East Sixty-ninth Street, with a line of cars behind me, honking impatiently because they couldn't pass, due to the fact that there was a Stanley Steemer van double-parked across the street from my aunt and uncle's building.

Why me? Really. I'd like to know.

The cab pulled away so fast, I practically had to leap between two parked cars to keep from getting run over. The honking stopped as the line of cars that had been waiting behind the cab started moving again, their drivers all throwing me dirty looks as they went by.

It was all the dirty looks that did it—made me realize I was really in New York City. At last.

And yeah, I'd seen the skyline from the cab as it crossed the Triboro Bridge... the island of Manhattan, in all its gritty glory, with the Empire State Building sticking up from the middle of it like a big glittery middle finger.

But the dirty looks were what really cinched it. No one back in Hancock would ever have been that mean to someone who was clearly from out of town.

Not that all that many people visit Hancock. But whatever.

Then there was the street I was standing on. It was one of those streets that look exactly like the ones they always show on TV when they're trying to let you know something is set in New York. Like on Law and Order. You know, the narrow three- or four-story brownstones with the brightly painted front doors and the stone stoops....

According to my mom, most brownstones in New York City were originally single-family homes when they were built way back in the 1800s. But now they've been divided up into apartments, so that there's one—or sometimes even two or more families—per floor.

Not Mom's sister Evelyn's brownstone, though. Aunt Evelyn and Uncle Ted Gardiner own all four floors of their brownstone. That's practically one floor per person, since Aunt Evelyn and Uncle Ted only have three kids, my cousins Tory, Teddy, and Alice.

Back home, we just have two floors, but there are seven people living on them. And only one bathroom. Not that I'm complaining. Still, ever since my sister Courtney discovered blow-outs, it's been pretty grim at home.

But as tall as my aunt and uncle's house was, it was really narrow—just three windows across. Still, it was a very pretty townhouse, painted gray, with lighter gray trim. The door was a bright, cheerful yellow. There were yellow flower boxes along the base of each window, flower boxes from which bright red—and obviously newly planted, since it was only the middle of April, and not quite warm enough for them—geraniums spilled.

It was nice to know that, even in a sophisticated city like New York, people still realized how homey and welcoming a box of geraniums could be. The sight of those geraniums cheered me up a little.

Like maybe Aunt Evelyn and Uncle Ted just forgot I was arriving today, and hadn't deliberately failed to meet me at the airport because they'd changed their minds about letting me come to stay.

Like everything was going to be all right, after all.

Yeah. With my luck, probably not.

I started up the steps to the front door of 326 East Sixty-ninth Street, then realized I couldn't make it with both bags and my violin. Leaving one bag on the sidewalk, I dragged the other up the steps with me, my violin tucked under one arm. I deposited the first suitcase and my violin case at the top of the steps, then hurried back down for the second suitcase, which I'd left on the sidewalk.

Only I guess I took the steps a little too fast, since I nearly tripped and fell flat on my face on the sidewalk. I managed to catch myself at the last moment by grabbing some of the wrought-iron fencing the Gardiners had put up...

Jinx (PLM). Copyright © by Meg Cabot. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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First Chapter

Jinx

Chapter One

The thing is, my luck's always been rotten. Just look at my name: Jean. Not Jean Marie, or Jeanine, or Jeanette, or even Jeanne. Just Jean. Did you know in France, they name boys Jean? It's French for John.

And okay, I don't live in France. But still. I'm basically a girl named John. If I lived in France, anyway.

This is the kind of luck I have. The kind of luck I've had since before Mom even filled out my birth certificate.

So it wasn't any big surprise to me when the cab driver didn't help me with my suitcase. I'd already had to endure arriving at the airport to find no one there to greet me, and then got no answer to my many phone calls, asking where my aunt and uncle were. Did they not want me after all? Had they changed their minds? Had they heard about my bad luck—all the way from Iowa—and decided they didn't want any of it to rub off on them?

But even if that were true—and as I'd told myself a million times since arriving at baggage claim, where they were supposed to have met me, and seeing no one but skycaps and limo drivers with little signs with everyone's names on them but mine—there was nothing I could do about it. I certainly couldn't go home. It was New York City—and Aunt Evelyn and Uncle Ted's house—or bust.

So when the cab driver, instead of getting out and helping me with my bags, just pushed a little button so that the trunk popped open a few inches, it wasn't the worst thing that had ever happened to me. It wasn't even the worst thing that had happened to me that day.

I pulled out my bags, each of which hadto weigh fifty thousand pounds, at least—except my violin case, of course—and then closed the trunk again, all while standing in the middle of East Sixty-ninth Street, with a line of cars behind me, honking impatiently because they couldn't pass, due to the fact that there was a Stanley Steemer van double-parked across the street from my aunt and uncle's building.

Why me? Really. I'd like to know.

The cab pulled away so fast, I practically had to leap between two parked cars to keep from getting run over. The honking stopped as the line of cars that had been waiting behind the cab started moving again, their drivers all throwing me dirty looks as they went by.

It was all the dirty looks that did it—made me realize I was really in New York City. At last.

And yeah, I'd seen the skyline from the cab as it crossed the Triboro Bridge . . . the island of Manhattan, in all its gritty glory, with the Empire State Building sticking up from the middle of it like a big glittery middle finger.

But the dirty looks were what really cinched it. No one back in Hancock would ever have been that mean to someone who was clearly from out of town.

Not that all that many people visit Hancock. But whatever.

Then there was the street I was standing on. It was one of those streets that look exactly like the ones they always show on TV when they're trying to let you know something is set in New York. Like on Law and Order. You know, the narrow three- or four-story brownstones with the brightly painted front doors and the stone stoops. . . .

According to my mom, most brownstones in New York City were originally single-family homes when they were built way back in the 1800s. But now they've been divided up into apartments, so that there's one—or sometimes even two or more families—per floor.

Not Mom's sister Evelyn's brownstone, though. Aunt Evelyn and Uncle Ted Gardiner own all four floors of their brownstone. That's practically one floor per person, since Aunt Evelyn and Uncle Ted only have three kids, my cousins Tory, Teddy, and Alice.

Back home, we just have two floors, but there are seven people living on them. And only one bathroom. Not that I'm complaining. Still, ever since my sister Courtney discovered blow-outs, it's been pretty grim at home.

But as tall as my aunt and uncle's house was, it was really narrow—just three windows across. Still, it was a very pretty townhouse, painted gray, with lighter gray trim. The door was a bright, cheerful yellow. There were yellow flower boxes along the base of each window, flower boxes from which bright red—and obviously newly planted, since it was only the middle of April, and not quite warm enough for them—geraniums spilled.

It was nice to know that, even in a sophisticated city like New York, people still realized how homey and welcoming a box of geraniums could be. The sight of those geraniums cheered me up a little.

Like maybe Aunt Evelyn and Uncle Ted just forgot I was arriving today, and hadn't deliberately failed to meet me at the airport because they'd changed their minds about letting me come to stay.

Like everything was going to be all right, after all.

Yeah. With my luck, probably not.

I started up the steps to the front door of 326 East Sixty-ninth Street, then realized I couldn't make it with both bags and my violin. Leaving one bag on the sidewalk, I dragged the other up the steps with me, my violin tucked under one arm. I deposited the first suitcase and my violin case at the top of the steps, then hurried back down for the second suitcase, which I'd left on the sidewalk.

Only I guess I took the steps a little too fast, since I nearly tripped and fell flat on my face on the sidewalk. I managed to catch myself at the last moment by grabbing some of the wrought-iron fencing the Gardiners had put up . . .

Jinx. Copyright © by Meg Cabot. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 171 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(89)

4 Star

(54)

3 Star

(14)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(10)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 171 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2012

    SEE FOR YOURSELF...

    I loved this book! Don't hesitate...just read it. You won't regret it.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 16, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Rating: 3 The Low Down: Jean Honeychurch is going to finish

    Rating: 3




    The Low Down: Jean Honeychurch is going to finish out her sophomore year in New York City, living with her aunt, uncle and three cousins. She’s leaving Hancock, Iowa, glad to be getting away from the small house, large family, shared bathroom and one boy. A boy that Jean liked, a lot, but stopped liking once he became too possessive. Not that it was 100% his fault...




    Jean is known as Jinx in the family, because bad luck seems to follow her around. And it looks like it followed her to the Big Apple, too. She’s just arrived, and already bad things are happening. First, her aunt and uncle forget to pick her up at the airport. Second, the cousin that’s her age, Tory, has really changed (and not for the better, either). Third, Tory’s gorgeous next door neighbor, Zach, almost gets nailed and badly hurt by a bike messenger avoiding a car. An accident that Jean sees before it happens, so she pushes Zach out of harm's way.




    The next day she in confronted by Tory (who goes by Torrance now, thank you very much). Tory knows something’s up with Jean, that Jean knew the accident was going to happen. She knows what Jean is, and she wants to be a part of it. But when Jean starts to sense that Tory isn’t interested in using this information for good, she knows that she is going to have to delve into something she has been trying hard to forget about - a legacy that she didn’t ask for.




    Best Thang ‘Bout It: I just love Meg Cabot. You know what you’re getting when you read her books, though there’s always a little secret in there, too. There was a little more darkness in this one! There’s some messed-up bidness up in here.




    I’m Cranky Because: When you’ve read as many book as I have, having the main character be oblivious to a potential love interest can be derivative; but if it is an otherwise good book, I try to read it with fresh eyes.




    To Read or Not To Read: Yes. It is a quick, fun read with a little bit of a dark side.




    Jinx by Meg Cabot was published July 31, 2007 by HarperTeen.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2012

    i love meg cabot! Oh and dont read this review!!!! Secret!!

    Omg im paco!!!!! Besides my husband, meg cabot is the most amazng person EEVVEERR!!!!!!!! I want to marry her and divorce my husband!!! She is amazing, and beauuuutiful!!!!! She is just sooo nice!!! Oh and one more thing...did you know shes a writer????? Sooo many hidden talents!!! Apparently she writes a lot of great books!!! So yeah gotta go see ya around!!!
    Love, <3
    Paco ;)

    2 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 22, 2011

    So far so good!

    Omg im getting this book! Halleujah for Meg Cabot.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2013

    Loved it

    I qish there was anpther book, it was ao awesome

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2013

    I enjoy this one by meg cabot

    Is book is really good and unusual for her right a good gril sprital and magic.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2013

    Roxas

    ..........er............

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2013

    Sasha

    Hey smexy

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 14, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Must Read by Meg Cabot. . . Yet Again.

    This book combines teen problems, action, and magic all in one book and turned out amazing, which is. . . rare. <BR/>A girl named Jean, nicknamed Jinx for her bad luck is sent away from home because of something caused by her so called "bad luck", which you will find out later in the book that it isn't 'bad luck' but something else.<BR/>She goes to live with her 3 cousins and aunt and uncle in Manhattan, and she needs to get used to living with rich people, for she comes from Iowa. <BR/>She gets into a fight with her cousin and is officially in a 'war' with her, and there are great twists in the story you did NOT expect!<BR/>My jaw was open the whole time!<BR/>A lovely story. . .<BR/>Another Must-Read by Meg Cabot!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2013

    Amazing

    This was a absolutly fantabulous book the girl Jean is a jinx without knowing it so trouble awaits

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2012

    Gr8 book

    I got this book from my schooo library and it turned out to be aa great book and since i have to give it up this wendsday i am thinking of getting it so ill always have it with me becausse i can only renew the book twice

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2012

    This was a disappointing book

    This book was extremely predictable. At first, the main character, Jean, explains how her life has problems, just like a lot of other books I have read. Jean seems to attract bad luck everywhere she goes, collecting the nickname Jinx. Naturally, she runs away from her problems. She moves in with her aunt, hoping her bad luck was left in her hometown, along with someone who has been stalking her. Her cousin Tory used to be so open to Jean, but now she is involved with drugs, and is convinced she is a witch who can do black magic. The boy next door is obviously the boy she is going to fall for, but who do you think has already “claimed him” but Tory, the witch. The whole book is about how Tory gets mad at Jean for liking Zach. At the end of the book, Jean’s stalker comes and finds Jean because Tory asked him to come. I thought this was a boring ending, as was the book as a whole.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2012

    Awesome book:)

    One of meg cabots best books. A must read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2012

    Loved it!

    Can you say awesome?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2012

    Meg has done it again!

    I've always been interested in Meg Cabots books, so when I started this one, i was pleasantly content. This is a good read and plot. I would recomend to a girl who hasn't read in a long time- this will be a satisfying come back.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2012

    Love2Read<3

    This book is awesome! I couldn't put it down. I didn't want it to end. I think Meg Cabot should make a sequel to "Jinx". Everyone should read it!! It's really good! It's funny, entertaining, kind of creepy.... all the good stuff ;)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2012

    Sequel please

    Meg do us all a favor and write a sequel

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2012

    Cierra

    Love it cant wait to buy more of meg cabot books

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  • Posted February 17, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I wanted to like it more than I did.

    Meg Cabot is the author of the wildly popular "Princess Diaries" series (adapted into two Disney movies starring Anne Hathaway and Julie Andrews), the "1-800-Where-R-You" books (loosely adapted into a short-lived series on Lifetime), "The Mediator" books (not yet adapted into anything), among a variety of other books for teens and adults.

    "Jinx" is Cabot's latest standalone teen novel.

    As her nickname might suggest, it is not easy being Jinx. Jean Honeychurch has been unlucky since the day she was born, with her luck only getting worse from there. Jean was even unlucky with her name: not Jean Marie or Jeanette, just Jean (although her last name does hearken back to Lucy Honeychurch in Forster's "A Room With a View" which is cool even though Cabot never mentions this fact in the story).

    It is because of her bad luck that Jean has to leave her family and friends in Iowa to come and live with her aunt and uncle in New York City. Readers don't learn exactly why Jean has come to New York until the middle of the novel. Until then Jean alludes to the reason she had to flee in annoying asides noting how no one knows the "full story."

    Jean had hoped to escape her bad luck in the big city, or at least dodge her reputation. But Jean's glamorous and sophisticated cousin, Tory, has other plans. In fact, she has a lot of plans where Jean is concerned. After another of Jean's unfortunate accidents, Tory realizes that Jean is magically gifted, which ties into an old family prophecy. Thrilled to have another witch in the house, Tory invites Jean to join her coven. But, for reasons that are revealed later in the story, Jean refuses. Family feuding and intrigue ensues.

    I liked the story here. But I wanted to like it more than I did. It was funny and light, which is really hard to achieve in writing. But certain elements of the prose were quite annoying. Every time Jean alluded to the "full story" of her trip to New York, I had to fight a strong urge to skim ahead and see what she was talking about. That's how long it took for Cabot to explain everything.

    Allusions like that are fun to build up the story, unfortunately Cabot doesn't use them very well in the narrative. Instead of creating tension the asides just make Jean seem like a pain for not explaining herself sooner. At the same time certain parts of the plot are predictable enough that it seems silly to build them up quite so much.

    Jean is also an infuriating heroine. She is incredibly likable, but also painfully naive and gullible. Cabot seemed to take Jean's "country fresh" personality way to far. Jean is so sweet that she is a veritable doormat to her less-than-loving cousin. Again and again Jean also shows herself to completely oblivious to what's going on around her. This behavior might be sweet for a country girl, but it seems forced--even for a sixteen-year-old from Iowa who may not be as worldy as this semi-jaded city dweller.

    This book wasn't great, but it wasn't bad either. (If the plot sound interesting, by all means give it a try.) I enjoyed reading it, but I expected more from the story and the characters.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2012

    Badass

    This book i have read before and since i bought the nook. I knew that id be able to read one of the best books by Meg Cabot. :P

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