J.K. Lasser's Strategic Investing After 50

( 1 )

Overview

It will help people to start thinking about their money in terms of accumulation, rebalancing, and income production. And it will take in-depth looks at risk tolerance, transition strategies, needed resources and tools--even strategies for those who are investing for the first time
Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (17) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $8.51   
  • Used (13) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$8.51
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(1638)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
New

Ships from: Fort Worth, TX

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$8.51
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(1638)

Condition: New
New

Ships from: Fort Worth, TX

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$50.00
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(241)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$58.77
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(220)

Condition: New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

It will help people to start thinking about their money in terms of accumulation, rebalancing, and income production. And it will take in-depth looks at risk tolerance, transition strategies, needed resources and tools--even strategies for those who are investing for the first time
Read More Show Less

What People Are Saying

From the Publisher
"A very good book. It is filled with practical investment advice that readers can easily understand and implement." Philip Edwards, Managing Director, Standard and Poor's.

"As an investment professional, I found Julie Jason's book to be an honest look at the risks as well as the rewards of the investment process, which are all too often ignored or misunderstood by financial advisers. This is a wonderfully clear, concise and informative guide for Boomers in their 50s and beyond." Christopher S. Litchfield, Managing Partner, Stingray Partners.

"If you are over 50 years old and you want to secure your future, Julie Jason, maps it out for you...how to invest, what to invest in, and perhaps most importantly, when to sell. Strategic Investing After 50 takes the mystery out of how to invest to secure your future, explaining investing concepts and strategies in plain English together with simple examples that are a cinch to follow. Julie also gives you a look at what your remedies are if you've had less than a sterling experience with your broker. Required reading for investors 50 years and older!" Samantha Rabin, Senior Editor, Securities Arbitration Commentator.

"This is a wonderful book. It is full of easy-to-understand advice on how to invest successfully. If my clients had read this book before they lost money, they would not have had the privilege of being my "clients." Seth E. Lipner, Esq., plaintiff's attorney and President, Public Investors Arbitration Bar Association.

"The opening sentence of the preface captured my mind and heart and whole being. I was hooked after the opening sentence. . . . and the Learning to Invest section is one of the best paragraphs I have ever read in a financial book.?The kind of pure straight talk that I love. . . . I feel the book will help me personally with my investing."--Jon Barb , author of Do What WorksTM (For You)

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780471397793
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 7/28/2001
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.47 (d)

Meet the Author

Julie Jason
JULIE JASON, JD, LLM, is a personal money manager with twenty-five years of experience in the investment industry, having started on Wall Street as a securities lawyer. She is the principal and cofounder of Jackson, Grant, an investment firm in Stamford, Connecticut, that specializes in managing irreplaceable assets. Ms. Jason writes a nationally syndicated investment column that originated in the Stamford Advocate and Greenwich Times. Her articles have appeared in such financial publications as Fortune, Consumers Digest, and Profit Sharing. Her previous books include You and Your 401(k) and The 401(k) Plan Handbook.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

The Difference 50 Makes

Age 50 is a turning point. And, it is a time of opportunity. If you approach it with some thought and preparation, you can begin a journey toward lifelong financial security. You still have the chance to build your portfolio to a sufficient size if you haven't done so. If you have, you can take steps to protect those assets and turn them into a stream of income for retirement.

Age 50 is also a time of consequences. At this age, actions have greater impact. A 30-year-old who loses 85 percent of his $1,000 investment in technology stocks can replace those assets much more easily than the 75-year-old who places the same trades and loses $850,000 of his $1 million retirement fund. Investable sums tend to be larger after 50. Losses hurt more. Money lost cannot be replaced in the same way it was acquired. This realization alone can help give you invaluable insight as to how to approach your own investment decisions from this point forward.

If you saved all your working career and chose an investment strategy that lost you a significant amount, how would you replace it at the age of 70? Would you go back to work? If it took you 20 years to accumulate those assets, how long would it take you to replace the amount you lost? When considering your personal situation, you may find it helpful to think of your assets in terms of how easily you could replace them if necessary.

The same is true for assets you might acquire through an inheritance, buyout, divorce or legal settlement, pension distribution, sale of a home, sale of a business, or an insurance deathbenefit. If you lost a substantial part of this money, would you be able to replace it in the same manner? Usually the answer is no.

It helps to think of lifelong savings and assets acquired through once-in-a-lifetime events as "irreplaceable," since that gives them a certain importance that distinguishes the type of investing that you might have done at a younger age. Irreplaceable assets is a term I use to distinguish investments made from current earnings. Irreplaceable assets must be invested with more care, no matter the dollar amount involved. At this point in life, the problem investors need to solve is not how to make money, but how to make it last. At this point, there is less margin for error.


TIP
When considering your personal situation, you may find it helpful to think of your assets in terms of how easily you could replace them if necessary.

Goals

Goals may also be different at this stage of life. A young person normally supports himself* through current earnings and invests for growth. These days, a retired individual will probably need to support himself with his own private savings, at least in part. At some point after 50, your portfolio may need to be structured to produce cash flow for living expenses.

Risk

In some cases, a person over 50 may take on more risk than is prudent, probably because he did not build sufficient assets when young. A younger investor will be more focused on compounding to help build assets over time. Due to a shorter investment horizon, an older individual cannot expect to see the multiplier factor create as much wealth as he would like.


NOTE
Compounding is the mathematical phenomenon that affects rates of growth of an investment over time. It is the multiplier effect.

Changes in Pension Expectations

Before retirement, your living expenses are covered by your paycheck. Not too long ago, workers could expect their pension to support them through retirement. When added to Social Security retirement benefits, such pensions generally covered the lifelong expenses of long-term employees.

That was yesterday. Today, there are four strong reasons why this is no longer economic reality:

  1. People are living much longer than 68 or 70, the life span of a working male just a few years ago.
  2. People change jobs much more frequently and do not qualify for lifelong pensions of any significance.
  3. Fewer companies offer lifelong pensions.
  4. Social Security benefits may not be meaningful. The maximum annual benefit you will receive from Social Security usually pays for only a fraction of your living expenses.

Realistically, today, an individual must look to himself as the primary source of retirement income.


CAUTION
Realistically, today, an individual must look to himself as the primary source of retirement income.

Strategy

While it is always important to invest against a plan, strategy becomes even more important after 50. A 30-year-old may get away with occasional stock picking without a plan. But, at 50 and beyond, random activity will not be very productive. At this stage in life, it helps to have a good strategy that takes into account your particular situation based on your particular needs in retirement.

Tracking Results

Monitoring your progress also takes on more importance after 50. Many investors go through life without knowing whether they are saving enough for retirement. Part of the problem is that they have not discovered a way to monitor their results. At this time in life, you need to monitor against your own personal goals, instead of arbitrary benchmarks set by common wisdom.

Regular monitoring against personal goals helps assure that you are making the right investment decisions. Monitoring is also important for another reason. Reviewing your results regularly gives you a chance to correct an error or a bad decision if you need to do so, before getting too far afield. At this point in life, you need to limit mistakes to a minimum, by catching them before they cause irreparable damage.


NOTE
A benchmark is a standard used to evaluate the performance of investment. A common benchmark for stock performance is the S&P 500 index.

Summary

Today, you need to look to your own assets as a source of financial stability going forward into the future. In some cases, you may need to pay for a good part of your own living expenses with the money you saved throughout your life. Many people who are entering their 50s have been saving money through their company savings plans, Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs), and personal investment accounts. Lawyers, doctors, businesspeople, nurses, teachers, and social workers, alike, often have accumulated sizable sums of money for retirement. Acquiring or having significant savings does not mean you have the wherewithal to know what to do with it.

In Chapter 2, let's take a look at common misperceptions about the financial markets and then in Chapter 3, let's consider what you can reasonably expect to achieve with your own investments.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface.

Acknowledgments.

The Difference 50 Makes.

Common Misconceptions about the Market That Might Affect Your Decisions.

Reasonable Expectations.

The Appropriate Use of Assets.

Understanding Portfolio Objectives.

Understanding Capital Commitment Based on Cash-Flow Demands.

Demands-Based Investment Objectives: A Case Study.

Portfolio Strategy.

Monitoring and Reviewing Results.

Risk.

The Job of Managing Your Portfolio.

Investing for Capital Appreciation.

Selecting Investments for Capital for Appreciation.

Selling Rules and Selection Criteria.

Selecting Stock Mutual Funds.

Investing for Income.

Investing for Preservation of Capital.

Types of Advisers.

Interview Rules and Questions to Ask.

Opening a Brokerage Account.

Brokerage Account Investment Objectives and Happiness Letters.

Managing Your Brokerage Account.

Margin.

What the Industry Regulations Say about Your Brokerage Account.

Tax Considerations.

Tax-Deferred Company Savings Plans, IRAs and Variable Annuities.

Roth IRAs.

Timing Mandatory Distributions after Age 70½.

Mandatory istribution Planning.

Social Security.

Insurance and Estate Planning.

Where to Go from Here.

Appendix: Recommended Resources.

Index.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2001

    Thoughtful, insightful, in fact, outstanding!

    Julie Jason writes like she teaches. Insightful and fearless, Julie tells is like it is. Investing life savings after you're 50 is not easy. You LEARN when you read this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)