J.Lo

J.Lo

4.0 19
by Jennifer Lopez
     
 

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Crossing over from movie stardom to music stardom is a risky business -- just ask Johnny Depp, Keanu Reeves, or Eddie Murphy. As popsters from Frank Sinatra to Will Smith have shown, audiences are a little more accepting of singers who act than of actors who sing. So naturally, people were skeptical about actress Jennifer Lopez's 1999 debut, See more details below

Overview

Crossing over from movie stardom to music stardom is a risky business -- just ask Johnny Depp, Keanu Reeves, or Eddie Murphy. As popsters from Frank Sinatra to Will Smith have shown, audiences are a little more accepting of singers who act than of actors who sing. So naturally, people were skeptical about actress Jennifer Lopez's 1999 debut, On the 6 -- until the album went triple platinum. That success seems also to have bolstered Lopez, who sounds much more confident and in control on this sophomore album. From the first stripped-down beats of the opener "Love Don't Cost a Thing," Lopez and her coproducer Cory Rooney (who do get some help from Lopez-lovin' Sean "Puffy" Combs) demonstrate a shrewd ear for the clipped phrases, sinewy choruses, and "you go, girl" lyrics that have made Destiny's Child such a chart-busting success. As a result, J. Lo bears a bit more of a personal stamp than On the 6. Lyrics such as "I won't stop till I get what I want" (from the undeniably groovy "That's the Way") see Lopez flaunting her empowerment, and she's stepped up her delivery with additional sass. Clearly not afraid to put her sex appeal to work, she taunts with suggestive lines such as "three times in a row, all night I'll go" from the burning slow groove "Come Over." The Bronx-born diva offers up a bit more Latin flavor on this disc, including some flamenco rhythms and a pair of songs -- the last two on the disc -- sung entirely in Spanish. Lopez mostly avoids ballads (except for the sparse piano track "Secretly") in favor of booty-shaking dance pop, which varies from the electro funk of "Play" to the guitar and beats combo of "We Gotta Talk." Her lyrics may be overly predictable ("Come on play that song/Play it all night long"), but you'll hardly notice while you're getting your groove on.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Most snickered when Jennifer Lopez made her pop move in 1999, figuring that it was no more than a one-off vanity project. As it turns out, she was as serious about her pop career as she was about acting, and even if she didn't possess a particularly distinguished voice, she was earnest and had some good mainstream pop singles, delivered with some seriously sexy videos. On the Six was big enough of a success to raise expectations for its sequel, J.Lo, the first self-styled blockbuster of 2001. Essentially, this is the same album as On the Six, only a little longer with a little less focus and not as many memorable songs. This lack of winning singles becomes a drag, since at over an hour, the record meanders much longer than it should. Yet, meander isn't really the right word, because the album sets its tone from the start, with the ingratiating "Love Don't Cost a Thing." From that point on, the tinny, skittering drum machines, smooth midrange, and alluringly thin vocals remain the same from song to song, with the occasional Latin cut thrown in to vary the rhythm somewhat. Since both the production and Lopez play it cool, not hot, and there's not that many hooks, it all tends to blend together. Those that have hooks need a couple of spins before they catch hold, whether it's the aforementioned lead single "Love Don't Cost a Thing," "I'm Real," "Play," or "We Gotta Talk." Lopez's strong suit remains dance tunes, not ballads, which tend to disappear in this reserved production and mannered vocals (no more so than "Secretly," which never seems to gel). So, J.Lo winds up as musically a mixed bag. Its longer running time makes it a little less appealing than its predecessor, yet it has just about the same number of strong songs, all of which sounding of a piece with On the Six, which makes it a success on a certain level. Still, there's this certain feeling of staid complacency and ordinariness that makes J.Lo feel less fun than her debut.

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Product Details

Release Date:
01/23/2001
Label:
Sony
UPC:
0074646378625
catalogNumber:
63786

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Jennifer Lopez   Primary Artist,Vocals
Paul Pesco   Guitar
Rene Toledo   Guitar,12-string Guitar
Manny Benito   Background Vocals
Bobby Allende   Percussion
Karen Anderson   Background Vocals
Ed Calle   Brass
Tony Concepcion   Brass
Angel Fernandez   Trumpet,Horn,12-string Guitar
Nelson "Gasu" Jaime   Piano
Ozzie Melendez   Trombone,Horn
Archie Pena   Percussion
Mario Winans   Background Vocals
Raul Agraz   Horn
Alfredo Oliva   Concert Master
Mario Gonzalez   Acoustic Guitar
Ricky Gonzalez   Piano,Background Vocals
Corey Rooney   Background Vocals
Jeannie Cruz   Background Vocals
William Dubal   Background Vocals
Erben Perez   5-string Bass
Shelene Thomas   Background Vocals
Yanko   Background Vocals
Jimmy Greco   Keyboards
Richie Jones   Percussion,Drums
Nora Payne   Background Vocals
Michelle Bell   Background Vocals
Markes Domingo Quiñones   Percussion
Dana Taboe   Brass
Lena Pérez   Background Vocals
Christina Milian   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

Manny Benito   Arranger,Producer,Vocal Producer
Terry Bag   Vocal Producer
Jorge Calandrelli   String Arrangements,String Conductor
Kip Collins   Producer,Instrumentation
Sean "Puffy" Combs   Producer
Angel Fernandez   Arranger
Jean-Marie Horvat   Pro-Tools
Ted Jensen   Mastering
Greg Lawson   Arranger,Programming
Michael Patterson   Engineer
Dan Shea   Programming,Producer
Rick Wake   Arranger,Producer
Mario Winans   Producer,Instrumentation
Dan Hetzel   Engineer
Glen Marchese   Engineer
Joel Numa   Engineer
Corey Rooney   Arranger,Producer,Executive Producer,drum programming,Vocal Producer
J.C. Ulloa   Engineer
Julian Peploe   Art Direction
Paul Foley   Engineer,Pro-Tools
Jimmy Greco   Arranger,Producer,drum programming
Richie Jones   Arranger,Programming,Producer
David Swope   Engineer,Assistant Vocal Engineer
Jack Knight   Arranger
Troy Oliver   Programming,Producer,drum programming,Instrumentation
Jennifer Lopez   Executive Producer
Dave "Young Dave" Scheur   Engineer
Arnthor   Producer,Vocal Producer
José R. Sanchez   Programming,Producer,drum programming
Ray Contreras   Arranger,Producer

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