JNDI API Tutorial and Reference: Building Directory-Enabled Java Applications / Edition 1

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Overview

This book provides an introduction to naming and directory technologies and an overview of the Java Naming and Directory Interface™ (JNDI). The tutorial in this book progresses from the most basic to advanced JNDI capabilities and techniques, including more than 200 working examples that demonstrate writing, compiling, and running directory-enabled Java™ programs. In addition, this book contains a comprehensive reference section that documents all JNDI classes and interfaces.

JNDI enables programs written in the Java programming language to access naming and directory services—a vital element of the complex distributed computing environment for today's enterprise systems. A platform-independent interface, JNDI allows Java applications to work with standard and proprietary services from a variety of vendors—including the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP), Novell Directory Service (NDS), Microsoft Active Directory, and the Solaris™ Operating Environment Network Information Service (NIS)—so that enterprises need not lock into a single-vendor solution.

Specific topics covered include:

  • Accessing the LDAP via JNDI
  • Using the directory as an object repository
  • Configuring a JNDI client
  • Handling event notifications from the directory
  • Creating a federation of naming systems
  • Building a JNDI service provider

All developers using the Java programming language to write applications or subsystems that access naming and directory services will find this book an indispensable resource.

0201705028B04062001

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A book/CD-ROM tutorial and reference providing an introduction to naming and directory technologies and an overview of the Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI). The tutorial progresses from basic to advanced JNDI capabilities and techniques, and includes some 200 working examples that demonstrate writing, compiling, and running directory-enabled Java programs. A reference section documents all JNDI classes and interfaces. The accompanying CD-ROM includes JNDI software and service providers, the Java 2 platform, and a hypertext version of the Java Tutorials, the JDBC tutorials, and the JNDI tutorial. Lee is Senior Staff Engineer at Sun Microsystems, Inc. Seligman is Staff Engineer with the Java Software Development group at Sun Microsystems, Inc. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780201705027
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley
  • Publication date: 6/9/2000
  • Series: Addison-Wesley Java Series
  • Edition description: BK&CD-ROM
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 848
  • Sales rank: 1,209,355
  • Product dimensions: 7.16 (w) x 9.29 (h) x 1.73 (d)

Meet the Author

Rosanna Lee is a former Senior Staff Engineer at Sun Microsystems, Inc.,where she led the design and development of the JNDI technology and theX/Open Federated Naming (XFN). She is also coauthor of the Java Class Libraries books and posters in the Java Series.

Scott Seligman, a Staff Engineer with the Java Software Development group at Sun Microsystems, Inc., is a lead designer and developer of the JNDI technology. He contributed extensively to the naming and directory clients for the Solaris Operating Environment, including XFN and the Name Service Switch. Scott is the lead engineer for the Java 2 SDK, Standard Edition, v1.4.

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Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

How to Use This Book

This book teaches you how to write directory-enabled Java™ applications by using the Java Naming and Directory Interface™ (JNDI). It is divided into two parts: a tutorial and a reference.

It is intended as a tutorial and reference only for the JNDI and not for the rest of the Java Platform. For a tutorial-style presentation of the class libraries in the rest of the Java Platform, see The Jav™ Tutorial and The JFC Swing Tutorial, by Mary Campione and Kathy Walrath, and The Java™ Tutorial Continued, by Mary Campione, Kathy Walrath, Allison Huml, and the Tutorial team. For a reference-style presentation of the class libraries in other parts of the Java Platform, see The Java™ Class Libraries books by Patrick Chan, Rosanna Lee, and Douglas Kramer. This book also does not explain any part of the Java programming language. Several books are available for learning the language. These include The Java™ Programming Language, by Ken Arnold and James Gosling, and The Java™ Language Specification, by James Gosling, Bill Joy, and Guy Steele.

Following is an overview of this book.

Tutorial

The first part of this book is a tutorial. It is modeled after The Java Tutorial, by Mary Campione and Kathy Walrath.

Trails and Lessons

The tutorial consists of six trails-programming lessons grouped together by topic. To learn about a certain topic, go to the Table of Contents, decide which trail meets your needs, and go through the lessons in that trail. For example, if you are interested in writing a serviceprovider, select the Building a Service Provider trail.

You can read the tutorial sequentially or select trails in any order. However, some of the beginner trails are prerequisites for the more advanced trails.

The first page of a trail contains a high-level overview of the trail. It lists, describes, and provides references to all of the lessons on the trail. It also provides a detailed table of contents of the lessons in the trail.

Each lesson begins with an introduction to the material in the lesson. Most lessons contain many examples. Trying the examples as you go along will help you to understand the concepts discussed in each lesson.

Links

The online version of this tutorial is filled with hyperlinks to sections inside and outside of the tutorial. In this hardcopy version of the tutorial, these hyperlinks have been handled as follows.

  • A link to a section, lesson, or trail within the tutorial is replaced by a cross reference, annotated by a page number.
  • A link to a method, class, interface, or package in the JNDI has been removed. Use instead the reference part of this book to look up the item.
  • A link to an Internet RFC or Internet-draft has been removed. These documents may be accessed both from the CD that accompanies this book and the Web site at ...
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Table of Contents

List of Figures.

List of Tables.

Preface.

Tutorial.

Getting Started.

Lesson 1 Naming and Directory Concepts.

Lesson 2 JNDI Overview.

Lesson 3 Examples.

Lesson 4 Common Problems (and Their Solutions.

The Basics.

Lesson 5 Preparations.

Lesson 6 Naming Operations.

Lesson 7 Directory Operations.

Beyond the Basics.

Lesson 8 What's in a Name?

Lesson 9 Environment Properties

Lesson 10 Event Notification

Lesson 11 URLs

Lesson 12 Federation

Lesson 13 Miscellaneous

Java Objects in the Directory

Lesson 14 Storing Objects in the Directory

Lesson 15 State Factories

Lesson 16 Reading Objects from the Directory

Lesson 17 Object Factories

Lesson 18 Representation in the Directory

Tips for LDAP Users

Lesson 19 Comparison of the LDAP and JNDI Models

Lesson 20 Security

Lesson 21 Miscellaneous

Lesson 22 Searches

Lesson 23 Referrals

Lesson 24 Schema

Lesson 25 Controls and Extensions

Lesson 26 Frequently Asked Questions

Building a Service Provider

Lesson 27 The Big Picture

Lesson 28 The Ground Rules

Lesson 29 The Essential Components

Lesson 30 Adding Directory Support

Lesson 31 Adding URL Support

Lesson 32 Adding Federation Support

Lesson 33 Miscellaneous

Class Libraries Reference

Package Overviews

javax.naming

javax.naming.directory

javax.naming.event

javax.naming.ldap

javax.naming.spi

Alphabetical Reference of Classes

Attribute

AttributeInUseException

AttributeModificationException

Attributes

AuthenticationException

AuthenticationNotSupportedException

BasicAttribute

BasicAttributes

BinaryRefAddr

Binding

CannotProceedException

CommunicationException

CompositeName

CompoundName

ConfigurationException

Context

ContextNotEmptyException

Control

ControlFactory

DirContext

DirectoryManager

DirObjectFactory

DirStateFactory

DirStateFactory.Result

EventContext

EventDirContext

ExtendedRequest

ExtendedResponse

HasControls

InitialContext

InitialContextFactory

InitialContextFactoryBuilder

InitialDirContext

InitialLdapContext

InsufficientResourcesException

InterruptedNamingException

InvalidAttributeIdentifierException

InvalidAttributesException

InvalidAttributeValueException

InvalidNameException

InvalidSearchControlsException

InvalidSearchFilterException

LdapContext

LdapReferralException

LimitExceededException

LinkException

LinkLoopException

LinkRef

MalformedLinkException

ModificationItem

Name

NameAlreadyBoundException

NameClassPair

NameNotFoundException

NameParser

NamespaceChangeListener

NamingEnumeration

NamingEvent

NamingException

NamingExceptionEvent

NamingListener

NamingManager

NamingSecurityException

NoInitialContextException

NoPermissionException

NoSuchAttributeException

NotContextException

ObjectChangeListener

ObjectFactory

ObjectFactoryBuilder

OperationNotSupportedException

PartialResultException

RefAddr

Reference

Referenceable

ReferralException

Resolver

ResolveResult

SchemaViolationException

SearchControls

SearchResult

ServiceUnavailableException

SizeLimitExceededException

StateFactory

StringRefAddr

TimeLimitExceededException

UnsolicitedNotification

UnsolicitedNotificationEvent

UnsolicitedNotificationListener

Appendix: LDAP Schemas

Index 0201705028T04062001

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Preface

How to Use This Book

This book teaches you how to write directory-enabled Java™ applications by using the Java Naming and Directory Interface™ (JNDI). It is divided into two parts: a tutorial and a reference.

It is intended as a tutorial and reference only for the JNDI and not for the rest of the Java Platform. For a tutorial-style presentation of the class libraries in the rest of the Java Platform, see The Jav™ Tutorial and The JFC Swing Tutorial, by Mary Campione and Kathy Walrath, and The Java™ Tutorial Continued, by Mary Campione, Kathy Walrath, Allison Huml, and the Tutorial team. For a reference-style presentation of the class libraries in other parts of the Java Platform, see The Java™ Class Libraries books by Patrick Chan, Rosanna Lee, and Douglas Kramer. This book also does not explain any part of the Java programming language. Several books are available for learning the language. These include The Java™ Programming Language, by Ken Arnold and James Gosling, and The Java™ Language Specification, by James Gosling, Bill Joy, and Guy Steele.

Following is an overview of this book.

Tutorial

The first part of this book is a tutorial. It is modeled after The Java Tutorial, by Mary Campione and Kathy Walrath.

Trails and Lessons

The tutorial consists of six trails-programming lessons grouped together by topic. To learn about a certain topic, go to the Table of Contents, decide which trail meets your needs, and go through the lessons in that trail. For example, if you are interested in writing a service provider, select the Building a Service Provider trail.

You can read the tutorial sequentially or select trails in any order. However, some of the beginner trails are prerequisites for the more advanced trails.

The first page of a trail contains a high-level overview of the trail. It lists, describes, and provides references to all of the lessons on the trail. It also provides a detailed table of contents of the lessons in the trail.

Each lesson begins with an introduction to the material in the lesson. Most lessons contain many examples. Trying the examples as you go along will help you to understand the concepts discussed in each lesson.

Links

The online version of this tutorial is filled with hyperlinks to sections inside and outside of the tutorial. In this hardcopy version of the tutorial, these hyperlinks have been handled as follows.

  • A link to a section, lesson, or trail within the tutorial is replaced by a cross reference, annotated by a page number.
  • A link to a method, class, interface, or package in the JNDI has been removed. Use instead the reference part of this book to look up the item.
  • A link to an Internet RFC or Internet-draft has been removed. These documents may be accessed both from the CD that accompanies this book and the Web site at http://www.ietf.org.
  • A link to an external document or software has been replaced by the item's URL. These files may also be found on the accompanying CD.
  • A link to a sample program or configuration file has been removed. Simply find the file on the accompanying CD (see later in this Preface for instructions).

Examples

All of the code examples in the tutorial have been compiled and run by using the following software.

  • The FCS version of the Java™ 2 SDK, Standard Edition, v1.2 on either Solaris or Windows NT or both
  • The 1.2.1 version of the JNDI class libraries
  • The 1.2.2 version of the LDAP service provider
  • The 1.2 Beta 2 version of the file system service provider

Most of the complete examples are available both online from the JNDI Web site ( http://java.sun.com/products/jndi/tutorial ) and on the accompanying CD. This tutorial is located in the Tutorials/jndi directory on the CD. Each trail resides in its own directory, under which are located subdirectories for each lesson within the trail. The examples and related files used in a lesson are found in the src subdirectory of the lesson's directory. For example, the examples in the Naming Operations lesson in The Basics trail are found in the Tutorials/jndi/basics/naming/src directory. Tools and utilities for configuring the examples are found in the directories Tutorials/jndi/config/fs and Tutorials/jndi/config/LDAP.

We strongly encourage you to try the examples that accompany this tutorial as you go along. To do that, you will need the JNDI classes and a v1.1.2 or higher version of the Java Platform software, such as the JDK software ( http://java.sun.com/products/jdk ). The JDK provides a compiler that you can use to compile Java programs. It also provides an interpreter for running Java applications. To run Java applets, you can use the JDK Applet Viewer or any Java-compatible Web browser, such as the HotJava™ browser.

Online Version

The complete online tutorial is available both on the accompanying CD and from the JNDI Web site. The title page of each lesson contains a URL for the corresponding lesson online.

Reference

The second part of this book is a reference. Its format is similar to a dictionary's in that it is designed to optimize the time that it takes for you to look up information about a class or class member.

Package Overviews

The package overviews briefly describe each package and its classes. Each overview includes a general description about the package, as well as diagrams that show the inheritance hierarchy of its classes.

Alphabetical Reference of Classes

This part covers the alphabetical listing of the classes from the following five packages:

javax.naming
javax.naming.directory
javax.naming.event
javax.naming.ldap
javax.naming.spi

The classes are ordered alphabetically without regard to package. Each is described in its own chapter that contains a picture of the class hierarchy, a class description, a member summary, and descriptions for each member. Most examples for the class or items within the class are found in the tutorial part of this book.

Class Hierarchy Diagram

Each chapter starts with a class diagram like that shown in Figure i. This diagram shows all of the ancestors of the class, its siblings, its immediate descendents, and any interfaces that it implements. In these diagrams, if a package name precedes a class or interface name, then the class or interface is not in the same package as the current class.

In the diagrams, the different kinds of Java entities are distinguished visually as follows:

  • The interface: A rounded rectangle
  • The class: A rectangle
  • The abstract class: A rectangle with an empty dot
  • The final class: A rectangle with a black dot
  • Classes with subclasses: A rectangle with a small black triangle in the lower-right corner

The class or interface being described in the current chapter is shaded grey. A solid line represents extends and a dotted line represents implements.

Class Description

In the class description, we describe all of the properties of the class. For example, the discussion of the properties of the Context interface includes information on how names and environment properties are treated. Describing in one place all of a class's available properties and how they behave makes learning all of the class's capabilities much easier than if that data is scattered throughout the member descriptions.

Any terminology used in the member descriptions is introduced and described in the class descriptions. For more information at any time, you should go to the class description.

Member Summary

The member summary is intended to help you quickly grasp the key points of the class. It groups the members into categories that are specific to that class. For example, in the Name interface the Update Methods category lists all methods concerning updates. It is intended as a quick summary of the class's members, so it does not contain any syntax information other than the name of the member.

As an example, following is the member summary for Attributes. Notice that all overloads of a method or constructor share the same entry.

MEMBER SUMMARY

Update Methods

put() Adds a new attribute to this attribute set.
remove() Removes an attribute from this attribute set.
Copy Method
clone() Makes a copy of this attribute set.
Query and Access Methods
get() Retrieves the attribute with the given attribute identifier from this attribute set.

getAll()

Retrieves an enumeration of the attributes in this attribute set.
getIDs() Retrieves an enumeration of the identifiers of the attributes in this attribute set.
isCaseIgnored() Determines whether the attribute set ignores the case of attribute identifiers when retrieving or adding attributes.
size() Retrieves the number of attributes in this attribute set.
Member Descriptions

The member descriptions appear in alphabetical order within a class chapter regardless of what kind of method or field they are. This is done to make locating a member proceed as fast as possible.

Overloaded methods are grouped in one member description because they share very similar functionality. The different overloaded forms are typically provided as a convenience for the programmer when specifying parameters. For instance, some overloads eliminate parameters by providing common defaults. To describe overloads with missing parameters, we use a phrase of the form "if the parameter p is not specified, then it defaults to the value 3.14." Other overloads take different representations of a value. For example, one overload could take a particular parameter as an integer, whereas another could take the same parameter as a string that contains an integer.

Each member description contains some or all of the following fields.

PURPOSE A brief description of the purpose of this member
SYNTAX The syntactic declaration of this member
DESCRIPTION A full description of this member
PARAMETERS The parameters accepted by this member, if any, listed in alphabetical order
RETURNS The value and its range returned by this member, if any
EXCEPTIONS The exceptions and errors thrown by this member, if any, listed in alphabetical order

SEE ALSO

Other related classes or members, if any, listed in alphabetical order
OVERRIDES The method that this member overrides, if any
EXAMPLE A code example that illustrates how this member is used (usually a reference to an example in the tutorial part of this book)

Typographical Conventions Used in This Book

Lucida Sans Typewriter is used for examples, syntax declarations, class names, method names, values, and field names. Italic is used when defining a new term and for emphasis.

Additional Information about This Book

Errata and additional information about this book and other books in the Java Series are available at the following URL:

http://java.sun.com/docs/books/

Please send feedback about this book to the following:

jndi-book@java.sun.com

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