The Job: Based on a True Story (I Mean, This is Bound to have Happened Somewhere)

The Job: Based on a True Story (I Mean, This is Bound to have Happened Somewhere)

3.5 6
by Craig Davis
     
 

Joe B. enjoys the sweet life as a vice president at a huge conglomerate, Universal Whirligig. But along with the Big Boss' favor, he has also gained the notice of a bitter human resources manager, Luci Fernandez. Hateful of any success but her own, Luci manages to get him demoted to the mail room! A rollicking comedy of errors follows. "The Job" is a modern parable of…  See more details below

Overview

Joe B. enjoys the sweet life as a vice president at a huge conglomerate, Universal Whirligig. But along with the Big Boss' favor, he has also gained the notice of a bitter human resources manager, Luci Fernandez. Hateful of any success but her own, Luci manages to get him demoted to the mail room! A rollicking comedy of errors follows. "The Job" is a modern parable of ancient troubles and truths.

Editorial Reviews

May Livros
I'm not a fan of Christian Fiction. At all. Religion is a sore spot for me, so I tend to stay away from the subject, when possible. ... That being said, I enjoyed the book, a lot ... I’m not Christian, but I understand. I loved the book, the funny parts were really funny, the smart parts were quite smart.
http://brazilianbookworm.blogspot.com/2011/05/review-job-craig-davis.html

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940011089671
Publisher:
Craig Davis
Publication date:
08/30/2010
Sold by:
Smashwords
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
191,493
File size:
259 KB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

After earning bachelor’s and graduate degrees at the University of Missouri, Craig Davis toiled for 20 years at newspapers, and has spent a lifetime in biblical scholarship. He wrote his first story while in Kindergarten, about King Kong. An amateur musician, he was once wrestled to the ground by a set of bagpipes.

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Job: Based on a True Story (I Mean, This is Bound to have Happened Somewhere) 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought this was a strange book. It is only 95 pages so it was a fast read. I did read it all but only to see if it would finally make sense..I understood the point the author was trying to get across, but it was just weird....like a dream can be sometimes. Glad it was free!
murphyslibrary More than 1 year ago
from Murphy's Library Joe B. is a lucky guy, with a lucky life. A good house, a good family, a good job. But what happens when Joe B., former Vice-President, is turned down and starts to work in the mailroom? It is obvious that Joe B. wants to know why he is there, he wants answers, he's sure everything is a big mistake. So how can he make the Big Boss see it too? How he will get the Big Boss to meet with him? The Job is a short book, almost like a tale. It is funny, the only character we really get to know is Joe B.-always Joe B., never just Joe-and everything else is just a background, it's secundary. The character gets our simpaty with everything he is going through, and we reflect about the little things we see in ou everyday experiences at work. Being a short book, I read it really fast! I think some of the reactions Joe B. had could've been tunned down a little, but, overall, I had a really good time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
GeekyGirlReviews More than 1 year ago
This book is humorous and short by Craig Davis . I couldn't put this one down. This one I highly recommend this book but a easy short read.
MRShemery More than 1 year ago
The first thing I noticed when I began reading this was the naming of the various offices within the main character's company, Universal Whirligig. The naming of the various offices, and company itself, was generic, exaggerated and humorous all rolled into one. For example, the main character's office was named the Development of International Integration of Core Technological Orientation (Emerging Nations Division). This office sounds believable, but it also sounds slightly ridiculous which, in itself, is humorous. As I continued to read and get into the story itself, I started realizing that there were subtle messages in this story. Messages that intermingle with each other and that we all could apply to our own careers. The most obvious is the fact that we all have Big Bosses who make decisions we don't understand. Sometimes, those decisions affect us or someone we know. If they do affect us, many times we don't understand why. Our job is not to question the Big Boss. Instead, our job is to do our job ... to the best of our abilities. The Big Boss does see all of his/her employees whether those employees realize it or not. It seems like a 'Big Brother' situation, but it's true. And, if we continue to do our job to the best of our abilities, the Big Boss (or Bosses in some cases) will notice it and good things will happen. Herein lies another message ... we should always do our jobs to the best of our abilities ... despite our confusion, our despair, our anger, etc. Doing your job the best of your abilities will make the company look good, yes, but it will also give you a sense of satisfaction and self-worth whether you realize it or not. So what that there are bumps along the road (and I'm speaking to myself as well as you), those are to be expected in every area of life ... we just need to keep pressing on and doing what's right. Now we come to the third message ... No matter how you feel, you should always treat people with respect and dignity. Yes, you might get aggravated at a co-worker or customer. That doesn't mean it gives you permission to treat them rudely. You never know what people are going through in their personal/professional lives so it's always best to be understanding and patient. Yes, this may take some practice and you may not get it right away, but keep trying. Treating people with kindness will make you feel better about yourself too. Besides ... what goes around, comes around right? One day, you're going to be the person aggravating a co-worker or vendor ... don't you want them to treat you with kindness and respect? I'm amazed that I gathered so much from such a little book ... more than I expected to. I really think it would benefit most, if not all, people to read this book ... just for the enlightenment it'll bring as you're reading.
GraceKrispy More than 1 year ago
Joe B. has a great job he loves, a loving family, a wonderful house, and is an all-around lucky, lucky guy. Unfortunately, his good deeds have not gone unnoticed by a certain, spiteful employee with enough power to finagle a demotion for him. Suddenly, the former Vice President at Universal Whirligig finds himself working in the mailroom, and his whole words is thrown upside-down. Struggling to find answers to this unexpected life change, he schemes to get a meeting with the Big Boss in the hopes that this (obvious mistake) will be resolved. His situation gets worse and worse until he finally gets the meeting he's looking for, but will he get the answers he's expecting? Humorous and fun to read, this book is, to me, a parable with religious undertones. As I was reading, I found myself reflecting on various Biblical stories and noting the similarities. After reading the story, I went online to read the official blurb and noted it was described as "a modern parable of ancient troubles and truths." I didn't realize that going in, but I definitely could see that as I read it. Although I frequently was reminded of stories from the Bible, this book really struck me as a parable of the story of Jesus- a bit tongue in cheek and with an added sense of humor, but many similarities in the suffering and the questioning of his future. I think the brilliance of this relatively short book is in its simplistic writing style and humorous outlook. I really liked Joe B. He wasn't particularly well-developed as a character, none of the characters really were, but you knew just enough to picture him and to understand his motivations and actions. The other characters were less-developed, but they were really secondary. Big Boss had a mythical quality to him (mysterious and omniscient), and Joe's attempts to get an audience with him ranged from inspired to downright ridiculous. In some places in the story, it seemed that there was an attempt to put a little too many meaningful details in, and I got a little sidetracked in those places. Simplicity in some of the details would have gone well with the writing style. The book lacked depth in the writing, but a reader could certainly read more into various aspects of the tale. This was a fun, lighthearted look at the workplace and the politics at play. It can also be read as a serious parody of belief and suffering, set in a modern workplace. A fun read! @ MotherLode blog