Jobs Rated Almanac: The Best and Worst Jobs - 250 in All - Ranked by More than a Dozen Vital Factors Including Salary, Stress, Benefits and More

Jobs Rated Almanac: The Best and Worst Jobs - 250 in All - Ranked by More than a Dozen Vital Factors Including Salary, Stress, Benefits and More

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by Les Krantz
     
 

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From the editors of the Wall Street Journal's Career Journal .com, this up-to-the minute almanac rates the 250 best and worst jobs, ranked by such factors as current salary and future prospects, stress risks, safety and security, enviromental conditions, physical demands, career outlooks, travel opportunities, and special perks.

Overview

From the editors of the Wall Street Journal's Career Journal .com, this up-to-the minute almanac rates the 250 best and worst jobs, ranked by such factors as current salary and future prospects, stress risks, safety and security, enviromental conditions, physical demands, career outlooks, travel opportunities, and special perks.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781569802243
Publisher:
Barricade Books, Incorporated
Publication date:
04/28/2002
Pages:
333
Product dimensions:
5.56(w) x 8.18(h) x 0.94(d)

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Jobs Rated Almanac 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Spectaverimus More than 1 year ago
A college recruiter put me onto this book a few years back. It compares careers in various categories, rather than a simple focus on pay. Some of the areas covered are physical demands, job security, and work environment. While an NBA basketball player may have breathtaking pay, other aspects of the job do not compare favorably to that of an accountant. The strength of this book is that it rates jobs on various fronts, and the jobs are rated by the workers themselves. For many of my students, it serves two purposes. Firstly, it allows them to see that many of the jobs that they assume they will do rate pretty low. The second thing it shows the students is that academic subjects like math, science, and english are not only useful in the "real world," but they tend to be essential for jobs that are both secure and fulfilling. I recommend the book for anyone who works with high school students (counselors, advisors, and special education teachers especially), as well as college students who are still vague as to their aspirations. It is a solid (though time-sensitive) reference manual, though the entertainment value can be pretty high at times.