Overview

Once Joe is online the world begins to change, and not for the better.

The story weaves between Joe's gradual transition from a disturbed and lonely teenager to the orchestrator of an online cult, and the efforts of Penny Hunt, a cyberterrorism expert, to track him down and stop him.

Spanning continents and decades, in 'Joe is Online' you'll meet a nefarious internet psychic, a evangelical tele-atheist and ...

See more details below
Joe is Online

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$0.99
BN.com price

Overview

Once Joe is online the world begins to change, and not for the better.

The story weaves between Joe's gradual transition from a disturbed and lonely teenager to the orchestrator of an online cult, and the efforts of Penny Hunt, a cyberterrorism expert, to track him down and stop him.

Spanning continents and decades, in 'Joe is Online' you'll meet a nefarious internet psychic, a evangelical tele-atheist and glimpse a world which seems just around the corner.

Praise for 'Joe is Online' -

"As Joe's crimes escalate, his and Penelope's paths cross in cyberspace. When the timeline of "Joe is Online" progresses into the future, we enter the realm of speculative fiction, as Wimpress builds on the themes of cyberspace, cults, and terrorism, theorizing what the future might hold were someone to combine the worst of each of these areas." (Big Al's Books and Pals)

"The threads gradually join up, linking various characters over a long period of time, drawing them into the exact moment where Joe Brady's world must either explode, or be shut down." (Reader's Favourite)

"This novel does a thing of beauty; my read of it at least left me ruffled, but strangely happy. Through all the pain, the doubt, the anticipation, the fear and dread here and there, the sadness and the relief, I was constantly reminded of the most precious of rules: each coin has two sides, and there are no absolutes." (Butterfly-ometer Books)

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940011287381
  • Publisher: Chris Wimpress
  • Publication date: 3/8/2011
  • Sold by: Smashwords
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 478,031
  • File size: 476 KB

Meet the Author

Chris Wimpress was born in Northampton in 1977. He read English at Edinburgh University and on graduating worked as a journalist for BBC news, including stints on the Today programme and at the BBC’s political department at Westminster. He currently lives in east London. Joe is Online is his first novel.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 9, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Joe is Online

    I'm a sucker for a story that takes place largely in cyberspace like "Joe is Online." Most of us have seen examples of how online behavior differs from the "real world." The internet has revolutionized the way people socialize and interact, making it possible to have "friends" you've never met on the other side of the world - friends you interact with more than your next door neighbor. This social change has given rise to two issues that seem to contradict each other. We don't always truly know who we're dealing with online ("on the internet, nobody knows you're a dog") yet the internet also makes invading your privacy easy. The intersection of cyberspace and real life provides a lot of opportunity for authors and their stories.

    "Joe is Online" is a story told entirely through a series of emails, chat transcripts, blog posts, web pages, and diary entries stored as word processing documents. This is different, but could easily have turned into a very dry read. Wimpress saves the book from this by cheating a little on what I see as the concept (having everything be an artifact of online interaction). In the "diary entries," which aren't online artifacts, the various characters relate what happened to them in much greater detail than a diarist would typically use. These diary entries even include extensive dialog, which is limited in the other kinds of entries.

    The story begins in the mid-1990s and doesn't end until 2020. The technology depicted doesn't advance much beyond what is currently available, definitely not at the speed it has over the last several years. This didn't feel unnatural, but it could for some readers.

    The presentation is also a gimmick. It helps the story along, but the story still has to be good enough to stand on its own. I believe it does. The character of Joe, a social misfit who is a whiz with computers, is familiar and believable. Some suspension of belief might be required, although given the stories of what young computer hackers have actually done, not that much.

    Since the title mentions Joe, you might expect the story is about him as well. It is, however Joe is not the protagonist, at least as I usually view the definition. Penelope Hunt is the main character the reader will empathize with and be rooting for, while Joe is the antagonist, the character that "opposes" Penelope.

    Penelope's story is more normal than Joe's. We follow her through university, where she studies International Relations, and eventually to Scotland for her PhD, specializing in the study of terrorism. As Joe's crimes escalate, his and Penelope's paths cross in cyberspace. When the timeline of "Joe is Online" progresses into the future, we enter the realm of speculative fiction, as Wimpress builds on the themes of cyberspace, cults, and terrorism, theorizing what the future might hold were someone to combine the worst of each of these areas.

    **Originally written for "Books and Pals" book blog. May have received a free review copy. **

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)