Joey and Jet in Space

Overview

Jet!

Where IS that dog?

No one has seen him...
not the space pilots,
nor the robots,
nor the multi-armed
thingamabob.

Maybe YOU will be the one to help Joey find him!

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Overview

Jet!

Where IS that dog?

No one has seen him...
not the space pilots,
nor the robots,
nor the multi-armed
thingamabob.

Maybe YOU will be the one to help Joey find him!

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
PW called Joey and Jet, James Yang's debut book, "visually enticing." Now boy and dog are back for a fun-filled frolic in the galaxy, Joey and Jet in Space. Yang uses the full-bleed spreads to capacity, filling the (outer) space with UFOs and space beings sure to capture kids' imaginations. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-The boy and the dog introduced in Joey and Jet (S & S, 2004) are back for another adventure. Jet flies off into the far reaches of outer space to chase a bone, and Joey can't find him. He asks space ships, moons, satellites, and planets if they have seen Jet. On one especially wonderful spread, Joey asks four robots if they have seen the dog and the text is playfully positioned to reflect robot-speak. Then he hears "Earth to Joey! Earth to Jet!" It's Mom calling them to lunch, and readers see them in their yard playing with robots and space ships. This clever story is visually engaging, and the digital pen-and-ink cartoons have appealing and humorous retro imagery. The text is simple, the concept holds interest, and the narrative is right on target for the intended audience. This is a fun book to share with children who love trucks, trains, and more far-flung gadgets.-JoAnn Jonas, Chula Vista Public Library, San Diego, CA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In a set of rhymes that should have second graders of all ages rolling on the floor, young Michael's report on a school-day's events runs afoul of severe restrictions on the vocabulary he's allowed to use. A parental interruption (see title) means that readers will have to supply the last word of each verse: "In Art my pal Richie got inky. / But Mom, that was only the start. / 'Cause Richie then made the room stinky / by blasting a really big. . . . " Catrow imbues the illustrations with his usual frenetic energy, placing the shock-haired young poet amid masses of messy domestic clutter and posing him with visual clues (e.g., finger in nose or pointing toward butt, holding a steaming mass of mashed potatoes, etc.) to aid those readers-if there are any in the entire world-who can't figure out the right rhyming terms. Put this on the shelf with more direct titles like William Kotzwinkle's tales of Walter the dog, Shinta Cho's The Gas We Pass (1994), Lisa Kopelke's Excuse Me! (2003) and such-or maybe with etiquette books. (Picture book. 6-8)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780689869273
  • Publisher: Atheneum/Richard Jackson Books
  • Publication date: 6/1/2006
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 1,398,943
  • Age range: 2 - 5 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.40 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

James Yang's prize-winning work has appeared in many magazines, including Graphis, Newsweek, Forbes, Fortune, and Sports Illustrated, as well as in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal.

When Joey and Jet, his first book for children, was published in 2004, Publishers Weekly praised it as "visually enticing." The Horn Book described it as "a minimal-vocabulary depiction of boy and dog [which] quickly segues into a lively tour of prepositions...a comical and satisfying story." Booklist called it a "clever, energetic romp." Kirkus Reviews declared it "an excellent introduction to what can usually be a difficult concept for youngsters." And School Library Journal said "libraries will want to fetch copies for themselves."

The designer of "Clockman," a sculpture on display at the National Museum of American History, Mr. Yang and his wife live in New York City.

James Yang's prize-winning work has appeared in many magazines, including Graphis, Newsweek, Forbes, Fortune, and Sports Illustrated, as well as in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal.

When Joey and Jet, his first book for children, was published in 2004, Publishers Weekly praised it as "visually enticing." The Horn Book described it as "a minimal-vocabulary depiction of boy and dog [which] quickly segues into a lively tour of prepositions...a comical and satisfying story." Booklist called it a "clever, energetic romp." Kirkus Reviews declared it "an excellent introduction to what can usually be a difficult concept for youngsters." And School Library Journal said "libraries will want to fetch copies for themselves."

The designer of "Clockman," a sculpture on display at the National Museum of American History, Mr. Yang and his wife live in New York City.

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