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John Barleycorn
     

John Barleycorn

4.2 23
by Jack London
 

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pubOne.info thank you for your continued support and wish to present you this new edition. It all came to me one election day. It was on a warm California afternoon, and I had ridden down into the Valley of the Moon from the ranch to the little village to vote Yes and No to a host of proposed amendments to the Constitution of the State of California. Because of the

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pubOne.info thank you for your continued support and wish to present you this new edition. It all came to me one election day. It was on a warm California afternoon, and I had ridden down into the Valley of the Moon from the ranch to the little village to vote Yes and No to a host of proposed amendments to the Constitution of the State of California. Because of the warmth of the day I had had several drinks before casting my ballot, and divers drinks after casting it. Then I had ridden up through the vine-c

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9782819924852
Publisher:
pubOne.info
Publication date:
12/03/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
248 KB

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John Barleycorn 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Bookworm2200 More than 1 year ago
London has been able to put into words cohesively that are usually heard as disconnected sentiments and war stories at AA meetings. This is a true work of genius.
Sisyphus48 More than 1 year ago
I don't think I have ever read a better book for illustrating alcoholic denial can run even in an intelligent man. It was obvious that Jack was a full blown alcoholic before he reached the age of twenty! I say "obvious" to us in 2012 who has the advantage of much more knowledge about alcohol and alcohol abuse than was available in London's era, One device he used over and over again to prove he was not a "dipsomaniac" was that he had periodic periods when he drank nothing and did not crave it or miss it. It is a fact that many members of Alcoholics Anonymous will tell you that they were periodic binge drinkers that went for extended periods of time without touching a drop of alcohol. They will tell you that they were not less alcoholic than the person than drank ever single day just a different type. The book is very well written, I enjoyed it a great deal. Anyone who has read this and enjoyed it must read Upton Sinclair's book " Cups of Fury". In this book Sinclair, an accomplished writer, tells of the myriad of his friends that were destroyed by "King Alcohol"; Jack London being one of them! Jack London had a beautiful way with words and it makes one wonder what people like him, Hemingway, and Fitzgerald could have written if they had not been crippled by alcoholism!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
loved it
CP49 More than 1 year ago
I have never been a great Jack London fan; however, after reading his battle with "John Barleycorn", I have a better understanding and appreciation of this author. He wrote with great authority on a subject that has been the downfall of many people since the first grapes were fermented to make an alcoholic drink. Too bad he lived and died about twenty years before Dr. Bob and Bill got together, with a few other drunks, to found AA, an organization that has been helping people exactly like Jack London battle John Barleycorn.
JHP More than 1 year ago
If you are a recovering alcoholic, or questioning about your own drinking, or you just plain like ol' Jack's marvelous, witty, adventurous, intelligent writing (even inpired Hemmingway...maybe too much) then read this under the moonshine. No, on a comfortable bed, couch, or chair, with ample light will do. This book will educate and reinforce the scientific proof about alcoholism. It's a terrible disease that sooner, but usually later, catches up with one who is somehow predisposed to drink because of switching on that certain chemical enzyme in one's brain that a majority of the population does not have as part of their DNA. When crossing that fine line after a very, very large number of continued drinking sprees, these souls find they cannot stop after they take that first drink. In this enthralling tale, Jack drinks his friends and work-mates, also alkys, under the table and then some. And yet still he became the highest paid writer of his time. He'll take you to the desperate world of "where, when and how can I get my next drink" on several uproarious adventures. It's well-known to those who are informed about the disease of alcoholism, that it usually progresses slowly, and then insidiously advances from it's first stage of warm, glowing ecstasy and wonderful, magical times for the first ten or fifteen years, to the second stage of "must having it" to function well. This second stage begins the long road of waking in the morning with minor withdrawals, but still feeling pretty damn good after downing a few. It only becomes worse from then on. Bad choices and mistakes followed by shame and remorse fuels more drinking to feel "just right", until the third and final stage of complete physical dependency. Dry heaves in the morning, terrible shakes, severe anxiety, soaring blood pressure, heart pounding, and then ER hospitalization to save oneself from the DTs (delerium tremens, which can be fatal if not treated) and the saline bags to replace all the precious electrolytes that have left the body so unbalanced and utterly dehydrated. Unless one abstains completely from taking that first drink which triggers a binge, he or she must get help...or death, insane asylums or jails await. If one drinks, the disease will begin again from where one left off and get progressively worse. A drinking life, I hope and pray, you want no part of. In Jack's day, they didn't have all the special knowledge we can now educate ourselves with and our children. They knew too much drink was not healthy and yet even today there's still an ignorant stigma attached to alcoholism as purely a matter of will power. This is a fascinating and informing auto-biography of Jack's sworn battle to conquer the elixir of drink. It will resonate clearly with those of us who need a reminder that alcohol is cunning, baffling, powerful, patient and deceitful. It will also resonate clearly with those who want to know the ways and results of an out-of-control drinking life. Sadly, as readers of his great collection of works know, he died of kidney failure brought on by his ruthless indulgence of drink at the age of 40. Not too shabby for his day with all it's liquored characters in this swirling drinking tale beginning very early in his life (age nine or so) and going on and on, swearing he had won the battle of the bottle, only to later realize himself, he would eventually be losing and lose to John Barley Corn.
Guest More than 1 year ago
John Barleycorn, the name Jack London gave himself as his alter-ego, tells of London's life and bouts with alcoholism. From start to finish, Jack London captures the mind in this personal memoir masterfully depicting all colors and hues in Jack's life. Living the first chapters of his life in Oakland, Jack worked his way up from nothing to being a rebel oyster pirate. Being in the kind of environment he was in, Jack soon found himself at the local bar very often enjoying a few drinks or two with his mates. This was the start of a life filled with alcoholism and depression which he referred to as 'The White Logic'. The book later follows Jack further into his jobs and aspirations. This book goes very in-dept of the rough and adventurous life Jack had gotten himself into early. It is much more then an autobiography, its a journey into the genius mind of a legendary American author. Jack London is huge inspiration to any one battling alcoholism and this book serves as an American milestone in literature regarding struggles and alcoholism.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a must for anyone iterested in alcoholism - social, physical and moral aspects. For people familiar with 12-step literature, this book talks about 'what it was like'. The horror of it all is that there was no 'what happened, and whati it is like now.' Jack London died a ruined main. Such genius. If he was alive in 1935, he could have found help. This is a chilling portrait of what alcoholism does to the individual. If there is a Heaven, Jack is certainly there. This book shows how he lived in hell.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It is basically nothing more than memoirs of London's drinking life. But he tells each individual story masterfully. He really makes you believe that he was not an alcoholic. It also tells of some his bouts with depression which he termed 'The White Logic.' Very entertaining and thought provoking, a must read for London fans.
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manirul01 More than 1 year ago
Beautiful
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Padded in and laid down.
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Femi Young More than 1 year ago
I dont know if any of you are aware of this, but this book is also available to download for free. I know 0.95 isnt a lot of money, but I'm just a little confused as to why the same book is offered with two different payment options... just thought I could save someone a couple cents... enjoy your novel :)
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