John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress

John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress

4.8 7
by Gary D. Schmidt, Barry Moser
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

National Book Award finalist and two-time Newbery Honor-winning author Gary D. Schmidt recaptures the classic tale of one man's spiritual journey in this contemporary retelling of John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, masterfully illustrated with watercolors by artist Barry Moser.

Here again is the tale of Christian's epic trek from

Overview

National Book Award finalist and two-time Newbery Honor-winning author Gary D. Schmidt recaptures the classic tale of one man's spiritual journey in this contemporary retelling of John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, masterfully illustrated with watercolors by artist Barry Moser.

Here again is the tale of Christian's epic trek from the City of Destruction to the Heavenly Palaces - of the pitfalls that threaten to waylay him and the graces that strengthen him along the way. Matching Bunyan's flare for storytelling and vivid imagery, Gary Schmidt's new narrative also echoes the style of writers like J.R.R. Tolkien, Dante, Sir Thomas Browne, E.M. Forster, and Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Even after three centuries, this odyssey of faith and human perseverance continues to inspire readers today - and now Schmidt's engaging retelling will delight and stir the imaginations of a new generation of pilgrims.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
AWARDS and RECOGNITIONS
 
Parents' Choice AwardRecommended winner (2008)

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"This masterly rendition of Bunyan's 17th-century allegory issues a welcome invitation to visit this classic. A treasure sure to delight young and old."
 
The New York Times Book Review
"If an earthly power can restore Pilgrim's Progress to the children's library, this handsome version ought to do it."
 
Booklist
"This beautifully designed book has large, heavy pages, each divided into two columns by a single, scarlet line. Moser's watercolor paintings, mainly portraits of the characters dressed in clothing from many eras and places, thoughtfully interpret the text. A beautiful edition, recommended for any library with an audience for the classics."
 
School Library Journal
"The text is beautifully illustrated with Moser's colorful, realistic watercolors. . . An interesting, accessible version of an old classic that many YAs have heard about, but not all have read."

New York Times Book Review
If any earthly power can restore Pilgrim's Progress to the children's library, this handsome version ought to do it.
Publishers Weekly
This masterly rendition of Bunyan's 17th century allegory issues a welcome invitation to visit this classic. . . . [Christian's] run-ins with an assortment of unsavory characters, monsters, seers and benevolent guides are brilliantly depicted in Moser's watercolor illustrations, which mirror the agelessness of Bunyan's moral. Author and illustrator produce a treasure sure to delight.
School Library Journal
The text is beautifully illustrated with Moser's colorful, realistic watercolors. . . . An interesting, accessible version of an old classic that many YAs have heard about, but not all have read.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This masterly rendition of Bunyan's 17th-century allegory issues a welcome invitation to visit this classic. While Schmidt modifies the vocabulary for a modern-day audience, he takes pains to preserve the spirit and artistry of the original text. His language is accessible if not invariably contemporary, as he tells how Christian leaves the City of Destruction in search of the Heavenly Palaces. His run-ins with an assortment of unsavory characters, monsters, seers and benevolent guides are brilliantly depicted in Moser's watercolor illustrations, which mirror the agelessness of Bunyan's moral. Author and illustrator produce a treasure sure to delight young and old. Ages 10-up. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Dr. Judy Rowen
John Bunyan's classic allegory of Christian's journey from the City of Destruction to the Celestial City remains powerful, but it is infinitely more accessible in this retelling. We have waited 300 years for this retelling, which should stand us in good stead for the next 300. Barry Moser's illustrations give flesh to the characters that Christian encounters-the faces are distinguished by subtle nuances of expression that make them perfect depictions of Obstinate, Hopeful, Timorous and the others. The book is a handsome volume, printed on heavy, ivory stock in a two-column format; it would be the perfect gift for a teenager awakening to spiritual issues.
Carolyn Phelan
Schmidt provides a clear, simple retelling of Bunyan's allegory. In this classic story, Christian leaves his home in the city of Destruction and sets out to find the Celestial City. Nearly drowned in the bog called the Slough of Despond and almost executed in a city named Vanity Fair, he is helped by such characters as Evangelist, Goodwill, and Hopeful, and hindered by Apollyon, Despair, and Deceiver, as he makes his way to his heavenly destination. This beautifully designed book has large, heavy pages, each divided into two columns by a single, scarlet line. Moser's watercolor paintings, mainly portraits of the characters dressed in clothing from many eras and places, thoughtfully interpret the text. A beautiful edition, recommended for any library with an audience for the classics.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802853462
Publisher:
Eerdmans, William B. Publishing Company
Publication date:
09/01/2008
Pages:
189
Sales rank:
425,779
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 7.30(h) x 0.90(d)
Lexile:
840L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

Gary Schmidt grew up in New York, close to the beaches of Long Island. He attended Gordon College and in 1985 obtained his Ph.D. in Medieval Language and Literature from the University of Illinois. Gary has written several children's books, a number of journal articles, and numerous critical reviews, in addition to having co-authored and co-edited several textbooks. His retelling of Pilgrim's Progress (Eerdmans, 1994) received a starred review in Publishers Weekly and was reviewed in The New York Times Book Review. More recently, his retelling of familiar Bible stories from the Old and the New Testaments in The Blessing of the Lord (Eerdmans, 1997) was named an ABA "Pick of the List" and appeared in Booklist"s "1998 Top 10 Religion Books for Youth." His novel, The Sin Eater (Dutton, 1996), received the Best Book for Young Adults Award. Gary currently teaches English Literature at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He lives in Alto, Michigan.

Barry Moser is the recipient of numerous awards for his work in such books as Moby Dick, The Divine Comedy, and Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. His work is represented in collections, museums, and libraries around the world, including The National Gallery of Art, the British Museum, and The Library of Congress. Barry lives in North Hatfield, Massachusetts.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Belinda39 More than 1 year ago
Pilgrim's Progress is a really great book. It has a message for both chilren and young adult readers. This book could easily connect to anyone's life. The struggle's that the main character Christian goes through are so familiar to people's everyday lives in general. He mentions so often in the beginning of the book how burdened he is and how he just wants peace. Who can't relate to this whether it's a child, young adult or adult. Whether it's homework, work or life everyone has some kind of burden. According to other reviews this book as been read in Sunday school classrooms, used to help in classroom management and just for self improvement. Anyone seeking self peace, I would recommend this novel as a guide.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was already familiar with this book through my sister's retelling as a child. However, I loved and remembered the story into adulthood and wanted to find a copy. The original version is wordy and more difficult to process because understanding the language is more than half the work. I am so appreciative of this children's version. The story is a gorgeous analogy of the walk we Christians take with our Lord. It is moving in its entirety and gives such hope as to the faithfulness of God. It is a children's version but quite appropriate for adults too.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've read this book to my three children, each of whom loved it. I've also read it to Sunday School classes, an episode each week. The episode involving Apollyon is a great story to read for Halloween season. The best reason to read it to a class? The story and action are absorbing, and as a result I find the book is the best class management tool I have. The main reason to read it, of course, is that the book teaches the main outlines of a theology of salvation that mainline churches seldom emphasize today.