John Milton: A Short Introduction / Edition 1

John Milton: A Short Introduction / Edition 1

by Roy C. Flannagan
     
 

John Milton: A Short Introduction

Using the still-evolving critical perspectives of the last fifty years, Flannagan puts the mercantile scrivener's son and Cambridge-educated poet Milton under the microscope as a radical social theorist who believed that some monarchs deserved to be deposed or beheaded, if they became tyrants, and who believed in

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Overview

John Milton: A Short Introduction

Using the still-evolving critical perspectives of the last fifty years, Flannagan puts the mercantile scrivener's son and Cambridge-educated poet Milton under the microscope as a radical social theorist who believed that some monarchs deserved to be deposed or beheaded, if they became tyrants, and who believed in freedom to worship the god of one's conscience, freedom to divorce in an unhappy marriage, and freedom from pre-publication censorship.

Flannagan examines Milton's God as the original father figure, incorporating both genders into one as He gives birth first to Adam and then delivers Eve out of Adam's side. Adam and Eve are the first happy couple and the first couple to argue over questions of authority, to the point where Adam considers divorce and Eve and Adam consider suicide. As the first ecologically fit couple, Adam and Eve begin life living easily within the natural world, but their fall skews Earth's axis and wrecks its delicate balance."

The book will be invaluable for undergraduate and graduate students coming to Milton for the first time and needing an introduction to the man and to his poetry and prose.

provides a readable and uncluttered critical account of a complicated and sophisticated author, and his poetry and prose.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780631226208
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
05/14/2002
Series:
Wiley Blackwell Introductions to Literature Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.50(d)

Table of Contents

1. Mercantile Milton.

2. Milton's Private and Public Education.

3. Educated Milton: John Milton, Gentleman.

4. Milton and Shakespeare.

5. Milton the Omnivorous Reader.

6. Political Milton.

7. Place in History.

8.The Prodigy.

9. Milton the Friend.

10. Milton Abroad.

11. First-married Milton.

12. Milton the Divorcer.

13. Infamous Milton.

14. "The Great Milton".

15. Milton the Egoist.

16. The Myth of the Unattractive Milton.

17. Physical Appearance.

18. Class-consciousness.

19. Milton's Sense of Humor.

20. Milton's First Great Poem.

21. "L'Allegro".

22. "Lycidas".

23. Elegies in Latin and English.

24. Decorum, Genre, and Modes: the Nativity Ode.

25. Sonnets.

26. The Serious and Even the Puritan, Masque.

27. Arcades.

28. The Masque often known as Comus.

29. Musical Entertainment.

30. Fairy-tale Plot.

31. Politics.

32. Performance and Character.

33. The One Just Man, or Woman.

34. Against the Bishops.

35. The Reason of Church-Government.

36. Wonder Years.

37. Of Education.

38. Divorce as a Serious Subject.

39. Prose Masterpiece: Areopagitica.

40. The Blind Warrior.

41. Plans for Great Tragedies.

42. Milton's Theological Niche.

43. The Baroque in Space and Time.

44. Blindness.

45. Narrator.

46. Solitude, Patience, etc.

47. The One Just Man.

48. Free Will, Disturbing.

49. A Creative God.

50. "Satan, He's a Liar".

51. Satan, Sin, and Death.

52. Plot and Parallel Scenes.

53. Competitiveness.

54. Self-fashioning.

55. A Remarkable Memory.

56. Slow Reading, on Purpose.

57. Epic Similes.

58. Explication.

59. Etymology.

60. The Printing of Paradise Lost.

61. Imperialism.

62. Monarchy.

63. "Paradise Found".

64. The Plot of the Brief Epic.

65. Paradise Regain'd and the Problems of a Cold-seeming Son of God.

66. Problems of Presenting a Speaking Jesus.

67. The Son as Student.

68. Diminished Satan.

69. Epic Devices in Miniature.

70. Political Undertones.

71. Searches for Meaning in Epithets.

72. Socrates, the Biblical Job, etc.

73. Class Warfare.

74. Quiet Closure.

75. Unpretentious Poetic Style.

76. Samson Agonistes and the Problem of Dating.

77. The Plot of the Dramatic Poem.

78. The Agon or Struggle in Samson Agonistes.

79. Harapha, his Giantship.

80. The Temptations to Luxury or Idleness.

81. A Chorus You Can't always Believe.

82. Quiet Closure of the Tragedy and the Short Epic.

83. In the End, "One's country is where it is well with one.".

84. Aftermath: Milton's Influence.

Works Cited.

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