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John Prine
     

John Prine

5.0 1
by John Prine
 

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A revelation upon its release, this album is now a collection of standards: "Illegal Smile," "Hello in There," "Sam Stone," "Donald and Lydia," and, of course, "Angel from Montgomery." Prine's music, a mixture of folk, rock, and country, is deceptively simple, like his pointed lyrics, and his easy vocal style adds a humorous edge that makes

Overview

A revelation upon its release, this album is now a collection of standards: "Illegal Smile," "Hello in There," "Sam Stone," "Donald and Lydia," and, of course, "Angel from Montgomery." Prine's music, a mixture of folk, rock, and country, is deceptively simple, like his pointed lyrics, and his easy vocal style adds a humorous edge that makes otherwise funny jokes downright hilarious.

Product Details

Release Date:
01/24/1990
Label:
Atlantic
UPC:
0075678154126
catalogNumber:
19156
Rank:
95

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

John Prine   Primary Artist,Acoustic Guitar,Fiddle,Vocals
Steve Goodman   Acoustic Guitar,Gut String Guitar,Vocal Harmony
Bobby Wood   Piano,Keyboards
Gene Chrisman   Drums,Tambourine
Johnny Christopher   Guitar,Rhythm Guitar
Bobby Emmons   Organ,Keyboards
Noel Gilbert   Fiddle
Bishop Heywood   Percussion,Drums
Leo LeBlanc   Guitar,Pedal Steel Guitar
Mike Leech   Bass
Dave Prine   Fiddle
Neal Rosengarden   Bass
Reggie Young   Guitar

Technical Credits

Stan Kesler   Engineer
Arif Mardin   Producer
Dale Smith   Engineer

Customer Reviews

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John Prine 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a must have for any fan of folk music. John Prine is a master at seeing the absurd, lonely and depressing side of life. His politcal statements come from a common sense point of view and are right on the mark. Was there ever a better written song about the desparation of old age than "Hello in There"; a better song about the benefits of escaping reality with pot than "Illegal Smile"; or a more poignent depiction of the horrors of drug addiction than "Sam Stone." It seems to me that there is the slightest hint of a wry smile behind it all. The arrangements are simple and effective, the writing is flawless, and John's distinctive voice is perfect.