John Quincy Adams: A Public Life, A Private Life

John Quincy Adams: A Public Life, A Private Life

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by Paul C. Nagel
     
 

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February 21, 1848, the House of Representatives, Washington D.C.: Congressman John Quincy Adams, rising to speak, suddenly collapses at his desk; two days later, he dies in the Speaker’s chamber. The public mourning that followed, writes Paul C. Nagel, “exceeded anything previously seen in America. Forgotten was his failed presidency and his often cold

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Overview

February 21, 1848, the House of Representatives, Washington D.C.: Congressman John Quincy Adams, rising to speak, suddenly collapses at his desk; two days later, he dies in the Speaker’s chamber. The public mourning that followed, writes Paul C. Nagel, “exceeded anything previously seen in America. Forgotten was his failed presidency and his often cold demeanor. It was the memory of an extraordinary human being—one who in his last years had fought heroically for the right of petition and against a war to expand slavery—that drew a grateful people to salute his coffin in the Capitol and to stand by the railroad tracks as his bier was transported from Washington to Boston.”

Nagel probes deeply into the psyche of this cantankerous, misanthropic, erudite, hardworking son of a former president whose remarkable career spanned many offices: minister to Holland, Russia, and England, U.S. senator, secretary of state, president of the United States (1825-1829), and, finally, U.S. representative (the only ex-president to serve in the House). On the basis of a thorough study of Adams’ seventy-year diary, among a host of other documents, the author gives us a richer account than we have yet had of JQA’s life—his passionate marriage to Louisa Johnson, his personal tragedies (two sons lost to alcoholism), his brilliant diplomacy, his recurring depression, his exasperating behavior—and shows us why, in the end, only Abraham Lincoln’s death evoked a great out-pouring of national sorrow in nineteenth-century America.

We come to see how much Adams disliked politics and hoped for more from life than high office; how he sought distinction in literacy and scientific endeavors, and drew his greatest pleasure from being a poet, critic, translator, essayist, botanist, and professor of oratory at Harvard; how tension between the public and private Adams vexed his life; and how his frustration kept his masked and aloof (and unpopular). Nagel’s great achievement, in this first biography of America’s sixth president in a quarter century, is finally to portray Adams in all his talent and complexity.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307828194
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
12/05/2012
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
318,738
File size:
6 MB

Meet the Author

During the first half of his career, Paul C. Nagel was variously a professor of history, a college dean, and a university vice president. Since 1975, he has devoted himself to writing, the most notable result of which is his books about the John Adams family, Descent from Glory (1983) and The Adams Women (1987), and another about the family of Richard Henry Lee and Robert E. Lee, The Lees of Virginia (1990). He has been president of the Southern Historical Association and a trustee of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, and is a fellow of the Pilgrim Society, a fellow of the Society of American Historians, a cultural laureate of Virginia, and a contributing editor of American Heritage. With his wife, Joan Peterson Nagel, he lives in Minneapolis. They have three sons, one granddaughter, and numerous grandcats.

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John Quincy Adams: A Public Life, a Private Life 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
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