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John Wilkes Booth: Beyond the Grave

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Overview

Leading the reader through a series of amazing coincidences and details, this book presents startling evidence that John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of President Lincoln, was never captured but escaped to live for decades, continue his acting career, marry, and have children. Compelling and revealing information in the form of papers and diaries has recently been found in private collections—materials that provide greater insight into the events leading up to the assassination of Lincoln as well as details of the ...
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John Wilkes Booth: Beyond the Grave

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Overview

Leading the reader through a series of amazing coincidences and details, this book presents startling evidence that John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of President Lincoln, was never captured but escaped to live for decades, continue his acting career, marry, and have children. Compelling and revealing information in the form of papers and diaries has recently been found in private collections—materials that provide greater insight into the events leading up to the assassination of Lincoln as well as details of the pursuit and capture of the man the government claimed was Booth.
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Editorial Reviews

Booklist
Can it be said that Americans enjoy few things more than a conspiracy theory? Just look at the persistence surrounding the supposed plot to kill President Kennedy. Though there are clouds surrounding the murder (thanks, Oliver Stone!), the legend has grown greater than the act itself. The same goes for Jameson’s book, in which a crime has become a national folktale. A distant relative of Booth’s, Jameson is on the trail of his ancestor who might not have been killed by federal troops after all (so say hushed relatives). Though the evidence is purely circumstantial and anecdotal, it is illuminating. It shines light on the ongoing obsession that there may be more to the story than we are privy to. If anything, this book simply poses questions that might never be answered. Aren’t humans pattern-making creatures? Therefore, what events lend themselves to pattern-making better than the conspiracy to kill a sitting president? Jameson intertwines wit, research, and family history into an enjoyable read.
Publishers Weekly
The story is a familiar one: John Wilkes Booth assassinates Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865, at Ford’s Theater in Washington, D.C. The murderer escapes, but is soon discovered and fatally shot by authorities. Drawing on newly available papers and diaries in private collections, Jameson (Lost Mines and Buried Treasures of Tennessee), a descendant of Booth, challenges that well-known narrative, arguing instead that the assassin escaped capture and lived out his life traveling through Europe and India before returning to the United States. Following the incident at Ford’s Theater, Booth fled and was helped along the way by various friends and associates, including Dr. Samuel Mudd, who patched Booth’s injured leg. From here, Jameson’s version of history takes a different tack: the author opines that members of the government—some of whom were involved in a plot to kidnap Lincoln—lied about Booth’s demise and engineered a cover-up in order to save themselves: a Confederate soldier—not Booth—was the man killed at the Garrett farm. Further evidence of Booth’s survival comes in the form of letters to Kate Scott, Booth’s mistress, ostensibly penned by her suitor and postmarked in England and India. This provocative examination of Booth’s story is certain to generate impassioned debate among historians and Lincoln lovers. 6 maps. Agent: Sandra Bond, Bond Literary Agency. (July)
Library Journal
11/01/2013
Armed with newly discovered personal papers and diaries from private collections, Jameson (Butch Cassidy: Beyond the Grave), a descendant of the Booth family, disputes the accepted account of Abraham Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth being captured and shot 12 days after killing Lincoln. Rather, the author contends that Booth eluded capture in April 1865 with the aid of sympathizers, fled the country, and traveled in Europe and India before returning to the United States. Jameson also declares that highly placed members of Lincoln's inner circle—some of whom may have been involved in an earlier scheme to kidnap the president—lied that Booth was killed and orchestrated a cover-up in order to conceal their complicity. A Confederate soldier bearing a poor resemblance to Booth was, the story goes, the fugitive's stand-in and was burned and shot at the Garrett farm. Further evidence of Booth's survival? Letters to Kate Scott, the assassin's former mistress, allegedly written by him and mailed from abroad. They used the aliases John St. Helen and David E. George. According to Jameson, Booth committed suicide in Enid, OK, on January 13, 1903. VERDICT Lincolniana fans and conspiracy theorists everywhere, as well as some Civil War history buffs, will welcome the provocative ruminations here.—John Carver Edwards, Univ. of Georgia Libs., Cleveland
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781630760403
  • Publisher: Taylor Trade Publishing
  • Publication date: 11/3/2014
  • Series: Beyond the Grave Series
  • Pages: 232
  • Sales rank: 1,378,938
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

A John Wilkes Booth family descendant, W.C. Jameson became interested in Booth when he was ten years old, when he was reprimanded by family members for bringing up the subject of the outlaw and told never to talk of him again. Jameson is also the award-winning author of 80 books and over 1,500 published articles and essays. He lives in Llano, Texas.
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Table of Contents

Chapter 1. Introduction
Chapter 2. Who Was John Wilkes Booth?
Chapter 3. Plots to Kidnap
Chapter 4. Plot to Assassinate
Chapter 5. The Assassination
Chapter 6. The Attack on Seward
Chapter 7. Escape
Chapter 8. Flight, Pursuit, and Death of John Wilkes Booth: The Traditional Version
Chapter 9. Flight from Washington
Chapter 10. Surrattsville
Chapter 11. Dr. Samuel Mudd
Chapter 12. The Swamp
Chapter 13. Re-enter Boyd
Chapter 14. The Crossing
Chapter 15. The Diary
Chapter 16. Closing In
Chapter 17. The Killing at Garrett’s Farm
Chapter 18. The Body
Chapter 19. Tracking John Wilkes Booth
Chapter 20. The Return of the Assassin
Chapter 21. Booth’s Secret Families
Chapter 22. The Strange Case of David E. George
Chapter 23. Analysis
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 24, 2013

    I found this book very interesting. While there are many things

    I found this book very interesting. While there are many things that are questionable, it has gotten me extremely interested in JWB and I will be reading many more books about this individual.
    I also found My thoughts Be Bloody to be a good book. It was mainly about the Booth family from the time Brutis Booth arrived in the US. There was very little about the assination but much about the booth family life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2013

    Jewelclan vote here

    Jc

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