John Williams: The Martyr Missionary of Polynesia

John Williams: The Martyr Missionary of Polynesia

by Rev. James J. Ellis
     
 

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John Williams: The Martyr Missionary of Polynesia, written by Rev. James J. Ellis. Published in London in 1900. With Engravings (186 pages)

Contents:

Chapter I. A Word With Many Echoes, 1796-1816. — Chapter II. A Stranger With Many Friends, 1816-1822. — Chapter III. A Voyage With Many Discoveries, 1823-1827. — Chapter IV. A…  See more details below

Overview

John Williams: The Martyr Missionary of Polynesia, written by Rev. James J. Ellis. Published in London in 1900. With Engravings (186 pages)

Contents:

Chapter I. A Word With Many Echoes, 1796-1816. — Chapter II. A Stranger With Many Friends, 1816-1822. — Chapter III. A Voyage With Many Discoveries, 1823-1827. — Chapter IV. A Trouble With Many Blessings, 1827-1830. — Chapter V. A Sowing With Many Harvests, 1830-1832. — Chapter VI. A Wanderer With Many Homes, 1832-1834. — Chapter VII. A Champion With Many Trophies, 1834-1838. — Chapter VIII. A Stephen With Many A Paul, 1838-1839.

The Publisher has copy-edited this book to improve the formatting, style and accuracy of the text to make it readable. This did not involve changing the substance of the text. Some books, due to age and other factors may contain imperfections. Since there are many books such as this one that are important and beneficial to literary interests, we have made it digitally available and have brought it back into print for the preservation of printed works of the past.

Preface:

...JOHN WILLIAMS must ever occupy a prominent and unique position among missionary heroes. His remarkable mechanical genius, his romantic adventures, and, above all, his tragic death, continue to invest his name with a peculiar charm. His place among the champions of the Cross is peculiarly his own, and in his own form of service, he is certainly inferior to neither Carey nor any other of the mighty men of Mission renown. The chastened sweetness of his disposition, which never degenerated into weakness, his ingenuity in devising expedients, and his resolute persistence in what often appeared to be labor in vain, together with the large heartedness that could "not be confined within the limits of a single reef," constitute him, in the writer's judgment, the very Prince of Missionaries, since the days of the Apostle of the Gentiles.
...An attentive study of his private journals has deepened the writer's reverence for the hero of his youth, and he is at present at a loss whether to admire more the greatness or the persistent goodness of the Apostle of Polynesia.
...In estimating accurately his character and work, it is essential to a correct judgment that we should seek to realize the conditions under which he labored. In his day the Missionary Societies were feeble and intensely cautious. They crept tenderly along the shores, being especially anxious not to lose sight of familiar headlines, and nervously fearful lest they should venture too far into deep water. They were horrified when this bold sailor ventured out into what they supposed to be hazardous experiments, but he did not suffer shipwreck or loss. The wreckage that was floated to him, revealed the unknown Continent he sought, and he went on until he discovered it.
...It must not be forgotten, that during the greater part of his life-time, he labored in comparative obscurity. It was not until after his visit to England that he was fully recognized as one of the master spirits which from time to time are given by Christ to His Church. Hence his success was not the reflex action of approval, as success is (without blame) in some instances, but it was solely the product of the principles which animated him wherever his lot was cast, and whatever he attempted to do. And whether building a vessel or translating the Scriptures, he was the same simple, earnest and affectionate disciple of Jesus and brother of men. Being such as he was, success was natural; not to have succeeded would have been a greater wonder still than even his marvelous triumph.
...The authorities upon which the present narrative is based are first, Williams' own matchless "Missionary Enterprises in the South Seas," a book as refreshing as it is interesting, because imbued with the writer's own gracious spirit; Prout's valuable biography, now out of print; "The Missionary's Farewell;" "The Martyr of Erromanga;" "Euthanasia;" the Chronicles and History of the London Missionary Society, together with the original journals of Messrs. Williams and Cunningham, and the narrative of an anonymous writer on board the Camden at the time of the massacre.
...The Author desires to gratefully acknowledge his indebtedness to his friend, the Rev. Samuel Tamatoa Williams, who not only supplied valuable information, but has also kindly corrected the narrative; to William Williams, Esq., who placed all the letters and journals of his lamented father at the writer's disposal, and to numerous other friends, who have rendered valuable service.
...It is believed that some incidents of the present volume are now published for the first time.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940016461380
Publisher:
Digital Text Publishing Company
Publication date:
04/18/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
186
File size:
795 KB

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