Johnny and the Dead (Johnny Maxwell Trilogy #2) [NOOK Book]

Overview

Post-life citizens
Breath challenged
Vertically disadvantaged
(buried, not short)

Johnny Maxwell's new friends not appreciate the term "ghosts," but they are, well, dead.

The town council wants to sell the cemetery, and its inhabitants aren't about to take that lying down! Johnny is the only one who can ...

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Johnny and the Dead (Johnny Maxwell Trilogy #2)

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Overview

Post-life citizens
Breath challenged
Vertically disadvantaged
(buried, not short)

Johnny Maxwell's new friends not appreciate the term "ghosts," but they are, well, dead.

The town council wants to sell the cemetery, and its inhabitants aren't about to take that lying down! Johnny is the only one who can see them, and and the previously alive need his help to save their home and their history. Johnny didn't mean to become the voice for the lifeless, but if he doesn't speak up, who will?

In Johnny Maxwell's second adventure, Carnegie Medalist Terry Pratchett explores the bonds between the living and the dead and proves that it's never too late to have the time of your life -- even if it is your afterlife!

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In Terry Pratchett's sequel to Only You Can Save Mankind, Johnny and the Dead, 12-year-old Johnny and his friends are hanging around a graveyard when the hero begins to see ghosts-and uncovers the local government's plans to sell the site for development. Johnny and his schoolmates' mission to save the cemetery provides ample opportunity for the author's signature wit. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
The second book in "The Johnny Maxwell Trilogy" gets off to a good start ("Johnny never knew for certain why he started seeing the dead . . . ") but quickly becomes a surprisingly poor read from the prolific author of Discworld, and the "Bromeliad Trilogy." The story loosely revolves around twelve-year-old Johnny and his fight to keep a cemetery from being destroyed, though most of the pages are devoted to other happenings that are not well-connected to this central theme. Attempts at parody and humor sometimes work—as in many of the conversations between Johnny and the "post-life citizens"—but most fall flat, or are too dated or too tied to the author's own (British) culture. There is a level of crassness, too, that borders on offensive, as in this description which seems intended to show what social misfits Johnny's friends are: "And then there was Johnny, and Wobbler, and Bigmac, who said he was the last of the well hard skin-heads but was actually a skinny kid with short hair and flat feet and asthma who had difficulty even walking in Doc Martens, and there was Yo-less, who was technically black." Young readers on this side of the pond are very apt to consider that racial remark a slur— and probably will not have a clue what "well hard skin-heads" and "Doc Martens" are. Brit-lit can be great fun, but there clearly could have been a heavier editorial hand in the Americanization of this book. Overall, a disappointing offering from such an experienced writer. 2006 (orig. 1993), HarperCollins, and Ages 8 to 12.
—Jane Harrington
VOYA
Fresh from saving the Scree-Wee race in Only You Can Save Mankind (HarperCollins, 2005), twelve-year-old Brit Johnny Maxwell is back and taking on a more terrestrial problem. He has started seeing the dead in Blackbury Cemetery. His friends think that he is nuts. Alderman Thomas Bowler, one of the aforementioned living-impaired, thinks Johnny sees the dead only because he is too lazy not to. The town council has sold the cemetery to United Amalgamated Consolidated Holdings who plan to build on it. "Trying times" in Johnny's family have progressed beyond shouting and through Being Sensible About Things and on to splitting up, so home life offers little help or comfort. Johnny is the only one who can speak for the dead. He does his best with the mostly reluctant help of his friends Wobbler, Yo-less, and Bigmac. While Johnny works to alert the living to the plight of the passed-on, the Breath-challenged test the bounds of their formerly constricted world. He succeeds in his task but realizes, as the dead move on to their various ideas of afterlife, that he was saving the cemetery for the living all along. Shortlisted for the Carnegie Medal when it appeared in Britain in 1993, this second volume in the Johnny Maxwell trilogy is part creepy fantasy and part dryly hilarious adolescent adventure with a core message about the importance of personal and community history. Fans of the first Maxwell outing or of Pratchett's Tiffany Aching Discworld books will be in heaven. Those new to Pratchett's work who do not feel gypped by the new slightly-more-scary-than-its-contents cover may be converted. The trilogy also provides the basis for a 1995 miniseries available only in the U.K. VOYA CODES:5Q 4P M J (Hard to imagine it being any better written; Broad general YA appeal; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9). 2006 (orig. 1993), HarperCollins, 224p., and PLB Ages 11 to 15.
—Timothy Capehart
KLIATT
Johnny, a 12-year-old British boy, discovers he can see and hear things others can't--the dead people in the local cemetery, for instance. However, a company named United Amalgamated Consolidated Holdings plans to erect an office building on that very spot, and when the dead find out about this scheme they are highly affronted. And the more Johnny finds out about these people and their history, including the local soldiers who marched off to WW I together and died together, the more affronted Johnny becomes, too. It's up to him and his offbeat friends, Wobbler, Bigmac, and Yo-less, to help save the cemetery, and that's what they bravely set out to do. This sequel to Only You Can Save Mankind shares characters with that book but it can stand alone. Pratchett, known for his Discworld fantasy series as well as for YA novels like The Wee Free Men, tells this unusual ghost story mostly in dialog, and funny dialog at that. A new treat for Pratchett fans, and fun for any fantasy lover. (The Johnny Maxwell Trilogy, Book 2). KLIATT Codes: JS--Recommended for junior and senior high school students. 2006 (orig. 1993), HarperCollins, 224p., and Lib. bdg: Ages 12 to 18.
—Paula Rohrlick
KLIATT - Paula Rohrlick
To quote the review of the hardcover in KLIATT, January 2006: Johnny, a 12-year-old British boy, discovers he can see and hear things others can't—the dead people in the local cemetery, for instance. However, a company named United Amalgamated Consolidated Holdings plans to erect an office building on that very spot, and when the dead find out about this scheme they are highly affronted. And the more Johnny finds out about these people and their history, including the local soldiers who marched off to WW I together and died together, the more affronted Johnny becomes, too. It's up to him and his offbeat friends, Wobbler, Bigmac, and Yo-less, to help save the cemetery, and that's what they bravely set out to do. This sequel to Only You Can Save Mankind shares characters with that book but it can stand alone. Pratchett, known for his Discworld fantasy series as well as for YA novels like The Wee Free Men, tells this unusual ghost story mostly in dialog, and funny dialog at that. A new treat for Pratchett fans, and fun for any fantasy lover.
School Library Journal
Gr 5-7-In this sequel to Only You Can Save Mankind (HarperCollins, 2005), 12-year-old Johnny discovers that he can see, hear, and communicate with spirits in the town cemetery. The cemetery, the only spot of unblighted land in the town, is about to be bulldozed and developed by a large corporation, so Johnny and his friends set about trying to save it (and its denizens) from destruction. Unfortunately, no one particularly famous was ever buried there, so the boys' publicity plan seems doomed-until the dead take things into their own innovative and rebellious hands, and Johnny finds the courage to take a stand against all odds. Fans of Gregory Maguire's books will appreciate the tongue-in-cheek tone and wry humor, and the quarrelsome yet friendly chatter among the dead spirits is reminiscent of Eva Ibbotson's titles. The plot (kids versus big corporation, a la Carl Hiassen) is tied up rather too neatly, but that's beside the point. Readers will take immense pleasure in the jokes, some broad and some subtle and dry, that come sailing at them from all sides. This book stands alone easily, but after reading it, kids will want the first one.-Eva Mitnick, Los Angeles Public Library Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Fresh from leading the ScreeWee fleet across hostile game space and back to their own territory, Johnny Maxwell returns to champion a more local group of beings in need: the dead denizens of the local cemetery, slated for redevelopment into Modern Purpose-Designed Offices by United Amalgamated Consolidated Holdings. Pratchett's cry against the needlessly tragic rejection of communities and their histories is just as passionate as was his cry against war in Only You Can Save Mankind (2004). Johnny allows himself to be conscripted by the dead, whom only he can see. They are an agreeable assortment of sweetly loony characters including a former Alderman, a suffragist, a socialist and an inventor, who, along with the rest of their fellows, represent the collective history and culture of Blackbury. If the narrative turns a bit preachy at times, kids will nevertheless find themselves won over by both the dead and Johnny's basic sense of decency. Humor and honest pathos play off each other to make for an emotionally balanced whole, one whose resolution will be as satisfying to readers as it is to Johnny. (Fiction 10-14)
Booklist (starred review)
“A wild ride, full of Pratchett’s trademark humor.”
The Observer
“A highly entertaining and irreverent tale from the master.”
Daily Mail (London)
“Terry Pratchett uses his wicked send of humour to hilarious effect in his new fantasy story.”
Booklist
"A wild ride, full of Pratchett’s trademark humor."
From the Publisher
“One of the best and one of the funniest author’s alive.”
Independent
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061975219
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/6/2009
  • Series: Johnny Maxwell Trilogy Series, #2
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 134,197
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • File size: 853 KB

Meet the Author

Terry Pratchett

Terry Pratchett is one of the world's most popular authors. His acclaimed novels are bestsellers in the United States and the United Kingdom, and have sold more than 85 million copies worldwide. In January 2009, Queen Elizabeth II appointed Pratchett a Knight Bachelor in recognition of his services to literature. Sir Terry lives in England.

Biography

Welcome to a magical world populated by the usual fantasy fare: elves and ogres, wizards and witches, dwarves and trolls. But wait—is that witch wielding a frying pan rather than a broomstick? Has that wizard just clumsily tumbled off the edge of the world? And what is with the dwarf they call Carrot, who just so happens to stand six-foot six-inches tall? Why, this is not the usual fantasy fare at all—this is Terry Pratchett's delightfully twisted Discworld!

Beloved British writer Pratchett first jump-started his career while working as a journalist for Bucks Free Press during the '60s. As luck would have it, one of his assignments was an interview with Peter Bander van Duren, a representative of a small press called Colin Smythe Limited. Pratchett took advantage of his meeting with Bander van Duren to pitch a weird story about a battle set in the pile of a frayed carpet. Bander van Duren bit, and in 1971 Pratchett's very first novel, The Carpet People, was published, setting the tone for a career characterized by wacky flights of fancy and sly humor.

Pratchett's take on fantasy fiction is quite unlike that of anyone else working in the genre. The kinds of sword-and-dragon tales popularized by fellow Brits like J.R.R. Tolkein and C. S. Lewis have traditionally been characterized by their extreme self-seriousness. However, Pratchett has retooled Middle Earth and Narnia with gleeful goofiness, using his Discworld as a means to poke fun at fantasy. As Pratchett explained to Locus Magazine, "Discworld started as an antidote to bad fantasy, because there was a big explosion of fantasy in the late '70s, an awful lot of it was highly derivative, and people weren't bringing new things to it."

In 1983, Pratchett unveiled Discworld with The Color of Magic. Since then, he has added installments to the absurdly hilarious saga at the average rate of one book per year. Influenced by moderately current affairs, he has often used the series to subtly satirize aspects of the real world; the results have inspired critics to rapturous praise. ("The most breathtaking display of comic invention since PG Wodehouse," raved The Times of London.) He occasionally ventures outside the series with standalone novels like the Johnny Maxwell Trilogy, a sci fi adventure sequence for young readers, or Good Omens, his bestselling collaboration with graphic novelist Neil Gaiman.

Sadly, in 2008 fans received the devastating news that Pratchett had been diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's. He has described his own reaction as "fairly philosophical" and says he plans to continue writing so long as he is able.

Good To Know

Pratchett's bestselling young adult novel Only You Can Save Mankind was adapted for the British stage as a critically acclaimed musical in 2004.

Discworld is not just the subject of a bestselling series of novels. It has also inspired a series of computer games in which players play the role of the hapless wizard Rincewind.

A few fun outtakes from our interview with Pratchett:

"I became a journalist at 17. A few hours later I saw my first dead body, which was somewhat…colourful. That's when I learned you can go on throwing up after you run out of things to throw up."

"The only superstition I have is that I must start a new book on the same day that I finish the last one, even if it's just a few notes in a file. I dread not having work in progress.

"I grow as many of our vegetables as I can, because my granddad was a professional gardener and it's in the blood. Grew really good chilies this year.

"I'm not really good at fun-to-know, human interest stuff. We're not ‘celebrities', whose life itself is a performance. Good or bad or ugly, we are our words. They're what people meet.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Terence David John Pratchett
    2. Hometown:
      Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
    1. Date of Birth:
      April 28, 1948
    2. Place of Birth:
      Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England
    1. Education:
      Four honorary degrees in literature from the universities of Portsmouth, Bristol, Bath and Warwick

Read an Excerpt

Johnny and the Dead


By Terry Pratchett

HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.

Copyright © 2007 Terry Pratchett
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780060541880

Chapter One

Johnny never knew for certain why he started seeing the dead. The Alderman said it was probably because he was too lazy not to. Most people's minds don't let them see things that might upset them, he said. The Alderman said he should know if anyone did, because he'd spent his whole life (1822–1906) not seeing things.

Wobbler Johnson, who was technically Johnny's best friend, said it was because he was nuts.

But Yo-less, who read medical books, said it was probably because he couldn't focus his mind like normal people. Normal people just ignored almost everything that was going on around them, so that they could concentrate on important things like, well, getting up, going to the lavatory, and getting on with their lives. Whereas Johnny just opened his eyes in the morning and the whole universe hit him in the face.

Wobbler said this sounded like "nuts" to him.

Whatever it was called, what it meant was this: Johnny saw things other people didn't.

Like the dead people hanging around in the cemetery.

The Alderman -- at least the old Alderman -- was a bit snobby about most of the rest of the dead, even about Mr. Vicenti, who had a huge black marble grave with angels and a photograph of Mr. Vicenti (1897–1958) looking not at all deadbehind a little window. The Alderman said Mr. Vicenti had been a Capo di Monte in the Mafia.

Mr. Vicenti told Johnny that, on the contrary, he had spent his entire life being a wholesale novelty salesman, amateur escapologist, and children's entertainer, which in a number of important respects was as exactly like not being in the Mafia as it was possible to get.

But all this was later. After he'd gotten to know the dead a lot better. After the raising of the ghost of the Ford Capri.

Johnny really discovered the cemetery after he'd started living at Granddad's. This was Phase Three of Trying Times, after the shouting, which had been bad, and the Being Sensible About Things (which had been worse; people are better at shouting). Now his dad was getting a new job somewhere on the other side of the country. There was a vague feeling that it might all work out, now that people had stopped trying to be sensible. On the whole, he tried not to think about it.

He'd started using the path along the canal instead of going home on the bus, and had found that if you climbed over the place where the wall had fallen down, and then went around behind the crematorium, you could cut off half the journey.

The graves went right up to the canal's edge.

It was one of those old cemeteries you got owls and foxes in and sometimes, in the Sunday papers, people going on about Our Victorian Heritage, although they didn't go on about this one because it was the wrong kind of heritage, being too far from London.

Wobbler said it was spooky and sometimes went home the long way, but Johnny was disappointed that it wasn't spookier. Once you sort of put out of your mind what it was -- once you forgot about all the skeletons underground, grinning away in the dark -- it was quite friendly. Birds sang. All the traffic sounded a long way off. It was peaceful.

He'd had to check a few things, though. Some of the older graves had big stone boxes on top of them, and in the wilder parts these had cracked and even fallen open. He'd had a look inside, just in case.

It had been sort of disappointing to find nothing there.

And then there were the mausoleums. These were much bigger and had doors in them, like little houses. They looked a bit like garden sheds with extra angels. The angels were generally more lifelike than you'd expect, especially one near the entrance who looked as though he'd just remembered that he should have gone to the toilet before he left heaven.

The two boys walked through the cemetery now, kicking up the drifts of fallen leaves.

"It's Halloween next week," said Wobbler. "I'm having a party. You have to come as something horrible. Don't bother to find a disguise."

"Thanks," said Johnny.

"You notice how there's a lot more Halloween stuff in the shops these days?" said Wobbler.

"It's because of Bonfire Night," said Johnny. "Too many people were blowing themselves up with fireworks, so they invented Halloween, where you just wear masks and stuff."

"Mrs. Nugent says all that sort of thing is tampering with the occult," said Wobbler. Mrs. Nugent was the Johnsons' next-door neighbor, and known to be unreasonable on subjects like Madonna played at full volume at three a.m.

"Probably it is," said Johnny.

"She says witches are abroad on Halloween," said Wobbler.

"What?" Johnny's forehead wrinkled. "Like . . . Marjorca and places?"

"Suppose so," said Wobbler.

"Makes . . . sense, I suppose. They probably get special out-of-season bargains, being old ladies," said Johnny. "My aunt can go anywhere on the buses for almost nothing, and she's not even a witch."

"Don't see why Mrs. Nugent is worried, then," said Wobbler. "It ought to be a lot safer around here, with all the witches on vacation."

They passed a very ornate mausoleum, which even had little stained-glass windows. It was hard to imagine who'd want to see in, but then, it was even harder to imagine who'd want to look out.

"Shouldn't like to be on the same plane as 'em," said Wobbler, who'd been thinking hard. "Just think, p'raps you can only afford to go on vacation in the autumn, and you get on the plane, and there's all these old witches going abroad."

"Singing 'Here we go, here we go, here we go'?" said Johnny. "But I bet you'd get really good service in the hotel."

"Yeah."

"Funny, really," said Johnny.

"What?"

"I saw a thing in a book once," said Johnny, "about these people in Mexico or somewhere, where they all go down to the cemetery for a big fiesta at Halloween every year. Like they don't see why people should be left out of things just because they're dead."

"Yuck. A picnic? In the actual cemetery?"

"Yes."

"Reckon you'd get green glowing hands pushing up through the earth and swiping the sandwiches?"

"Don't think so. Anyway . . . they don't eat sandwiches in Mexico. They eat tort . . . something."



Continues...

Excerpted from Johnny and the Dead by Terry Pratchett Copyright © 2007 by Terry Pratchett. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 15 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 21, 2014

    This book continues the saga of Johnny, from "Only You Can

    This book continues the saga of Johnny, from "Only You Can Save Mankind", and his misfit group of friends. While the first book seems tentative, in this one author Terry Pratchett's signature style is more fully on display, with an interesting plot and relevant, intertwined subplots. If "Only You Can Save Mankind" was the appetizer, this book, though a quick read, is neverthless a satisfying main course.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    terrific amusing satirical fantasy

    The town council wants to sell off the historical cemetery to a developer. They insist that no one except an old woman visits the place and it is expensive to keep it up. They do not know that twelve years old Johnny Maxwell uses it as a short cut and that he has personally met and talked with some of the vertically challenged residents such as the Alderman. The deceased people interred there are irate that their final resting place is to be bulldozed and refuse to lie around letting it happen. They draft Johnny as their spokesperson. --- Johnny enlists his friends like Wobbler Johnson, who thinks the whole thing is nuts but will help his pal. Their efforts to publicize the history are ignored as no one remotely famous is buried there in some ways even with names on stones it is sort of a Potter¿s Field. The dead are no longer going to take it so they plan to kill the project before their bones are rattled except that they cannot agree on a plan. Only Johnny can bring the two parties together, but neither the dead nor the living heed the words of a preadolescent. --- The sequel to ONLY YOU CAN SAVE MANKIND is a terrific amusing satirical fantasy that is fun for readers of all ages. Johnny is the center of the story line that holds together the graveyard humor with his family escapades and the townsfolk plots of future development. Perhaps the only quibble for adult readers is the fast climax, but remember the targeted audience is the preadolescent crowd who will laugh out loud at the ironic dark humor. --- Harriet Klausner

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