Joined at the Hip

Joined at the Hip

3.0 2
by Pinetop Perkins
     
 

It's hard to believe this album wasn't made a long time ago, actually, since blues pianist Pinetop Perkins and drummer and harmonica player Willie "Big Eyes" Smith have worked together frequently in the past 40 some years. Perkins replaced the legendary pianist Otis Spann in Muddy Waters' band in 1969 when…  See more details below

Overview

It's hard to believe this album wasn't made a long time ago, actually, since blues pianist Pinetop Perkins and drummer and harmonica player Willie "Big Eyes" Smith have worked together frequently in the past 40 some years. Perkins replaced the legendary pianist Otis Spann in Muddy Waters' band in 1969 when Smith was the drummer in the ensemble, and later Perkins and Smith formed the Legendary Blues Band in the 1980s. Perkins was 96 years old when the sessions for Joined at the Hip were recorded, but one wouldn't know it, and Smith, now out from behind the drum kit (his son, Kenny Smith, plays drums here), concentrates on his harp blowing and handles most of the vocals. The result is a solid Chicago blues record, one that feels like it could have been tracked anytime in the past four decades. The sound is big and warm and alive, and this is the Chicago blues without any annoying and unnecessary flash -- it just socks home where it's supposed to, with solid ensemble playing (Bob Stroger is on bass and John Primer and "Little Frank" Krakowski handle the guitars while Perkins, of course, mans the piano and Smith adds appropriate harmonica fills, with Kenny Smith on drums). Highlights include the opener, "Grown Up to Be a Man," a fine version of Sonny Boy Williamson's "Eyesight to the Blind" (the second Sonny Boy -- "Eyesight" was his first single back in 1951), and a compelling "I Would Like to Have a Girl Like You," which was written by Billy Flynn, who was also a member of the Legendary Blues Band with Perkins and Smith. Produced by Michael Freeman, Joined at the Hip is Chicago blues played straight and true, headed up by a couple of veteran blues musicians who not only know what they're talking about, they've also lived it.

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Product Details

Release Date:
06/08/2010
Label:
Telarc
UPC:
0888072318502
catalogNumber:
31850
Rank:
55541

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Pinetop Perkins   Primary Artist,Piano,Vocals
John Primer   Guitar
Willie "Big Eyes" Smith   Harmonica,Vocals
Bob Stroger   Bass Guitar
Kenny Smith   Drums
Little Frank Krakowski   Guitar

Technical Credits

Big Bill Broonzy   Composer
Melvin "Lil' Son" Jackson   Composer
Blaise Barton   Engineer
Michael Freeman   Producer
Brian Leach   Engineer
Neil Slaven   Source Material
Willie "Big Eyes" Smith   Composer
Stuart Sullivan   Engineer
Sonny Boy Williamson   Composer
Sonny Boy Williamson [II]   Composer
Rev. Thomas A. Dorsey   Composer
Bill Dahl   Liner Notes
Mike Leadbitter   Source Material
Joe Willie Perkins   Arranger,Composer
John Godrich   Source Material
Paul Pelletier   Source Material
Robert Gordon   Source Material
Billy Flynn   Composer
Leslie Fancourt   Source Material
Robert M.W. Dixon   Source Material
K. Dwayne Smith   Composer
Patricia Morgan   Management

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Joined at the Hip 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Lemmy59 More than 1 year ago
I bought this when it came out and immediately fell in love with it. "Joined At The Hip" is a solid, enjoyable album from two men who have lived the blues, and played it their entire lives - for Pinetop, that's a VERY long time, indeed! While it isn't groundbreaking in any way, it showcases Willie 'Big Eyes' Smith's ragged, soulful vocals on all but two tracks, and also proves what a great mouth harp player he is. As for Pinetop Perkins, who was 96 when this was recorded, he still played piano better than those half his age or less. While he should have sung more than two songs, it is a pleasure to listen to these two old bandmates/friends play some excellent material and the fun they must have had shines through on every track.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago