Jorinda and Joringel

Jorinda and Joringel

by Bernadette Watts
     
 

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Once upon a time, deep in the middle of a forest, stood an old castle. If a young girl wandered too near the castle walls, the witch turned her into a bird, and locked her in a cage inside the castle. But true love triumphs over evil enchantment in this story of one young couple, the beautiful Jorinda and Jorindel, the shepherd boy who loves her, who break free of

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Overview

Once upon a time, deep in the middle of a forest, stood an old castle. If a young girl wandered too near the castle walls, the witch turned her into a bird, and locked her in a cage inside the castle. But true love triumphs over evil enchantment in this story of one young couple, the beautiful Jorinda and Jorindel, the shepherd boy who loves her, who break free of the witch's spell and live happily ever after.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Though not one of the better-known fairy tales from the Brothers Grimm, this tale is one that could, or should, be more prominent. This friendlier Grimm tale begins once upon a time deep in the middle of a forest. A stereotypical old witch flits about as an owl or a cat during the day, but at sunset she always turns into an old woman again. Her curse is leaving young men who ventured near the castle motionless, and young women were turned into birds, locked in 700 cages that hung throughout the castle. Jorinda, the prettiest of all the pretty girls, and Jorindel, a shepherd boy find themselves too close to the castle, and the inevitable happens. Jorinda is turned into a nightingale and Jorindel cannot move until the witch returns to release him. Too forlorn and lonely to return home, Jorindel finds work keeping sheep in a strange village. A way to break the witches spell on Jorinda is revealed to him in a dream, but can a dream really provide the answer he so desires? Muted watercolors create the serene, placid, sensitive atmosphere of a couple deeply infatuated with each other, yet also provide the dismal, melancholy aura of the witch's castle. There are no prince's or princesses' in this fairy tale, making this seem a tale more realistic than others—and no animals or maidens were harmed in this story about love triumphing over all. A welcome addition to any fairy tale collection. 2005, North-South Books, Ages 4 to 8.
—Elizabeth Young
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 2-4 Although not one of the Grimms' most inspired, this tale of young lovers separated by a witch has been the basis of several picture books, including the excellent Adrienne Adams edition with Elizabeth Shub's translation (Scribners, 1968; o.p.) and Wanda Gag's charming translation with Margot Tomes' illustrations (Coward, 1978). This new shortened version retains the original plot elements and is well enough told, but the illustrations are a feast. Water-based paints on textured paper portray the action in a harmonious blending of rich colors and pastels. These pictures are reminiscent of old tapestries. The joy of the lovers, the menace of the evil witch, a sense of eeriness and of calm, are all equally well-presented. Those who want their fairy tales illustrated can hardly do better, although this does not supplant the Adrienne Adams version. Ronald A. Van De Voorde, Graduate Library School, University of Arizona , Tuscon
Kirkus Reviews
A romantic Grimm fairytale that's hard to find in a single edition is retold and made lovelier by Watts's pretty illustrations. A witch inhabits a castle in a forest; any young man approaching closer than one hundred steps is held there until he promises never to return. Young women suffer a grimmer fate: They are turned into birds and locked in cages in the castle. Jorinda and Jorindel are a young couple who wander within the witch's domain with predictable results. Jorindel, freed but distraught, dreams of a purple flower that will break the enchantment. He searches for eight days, finds the flower and it does protect him as he approaches the castle. He frees Jorinda, "and they lived happily together for many years," as do the 700 young women the witch had kept. The illustrations are lacy and dreamlike, with echoes of Chagall in the bright feathers and black cloak of the witch and the flower vision that inspires Jorindel. (Picture book/fairytale. 5-9)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780735819887
Publisher:
North-South Books, Inc.
Publication date:
05/28/2005
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.52(w) x 11.56(h) x 0.32(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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