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Josef Koudelka
     

Josef Koudelka

5.0 1
by Josef Koudelka (Photographer)
 

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Torst's introduction to Josef Koudelka (born 1938) provides a selection from all the key phases of his work: his 1960s portraits of the gypsies of central Europe and the Balkans and the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in August 1968; the travel photos of the 1970s and 1980s; and a concluding section of panoramas focused on industrialized landscapes.

Overview

Torst's introduction to Josef Koudelka (born 1938) provides a selection from all the key phases of his work: his 1960s portraits of the gypsies of central Europe and the Balkans and the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in August 1968; the travel photos of the 1970s and 1980s; and a concluding section of panoramas focused on industrialized landscapes.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9788072153978
Publisher:
TORST
Publication date:
04/30/2011
Edition description:
Bilingual
Pages:
188
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 7.10(h) x 0.50(d)

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Josef Koudelka 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
No better companion to Koudelka's remarkable work as illustrated in 'Chaos' edited by Delpire in 1999 than this little book. The only place where you will read a comprehensive interview of someone who distrust the word and has chosen the image. This book will reward you with extremely well reproduced photographs for a very reasonable price, in the tradition of the Photopoche series. It is probably the only place, except for the comprehensive retrospective curated by Robert Delpire (again, ...but he was the first one to publish Robert Frank's 'The American' in 1958 when no-one else would)and shown at the French International Photo Festival in Arles this summer (2002), summarizing Koudelka's life in photography from his debuts in the theaters of Prague to the documentation of Gypsies, the invasion of the same city in 1968, and the more recent panoramic work. Ordering chaos to show chaos, the chaos engendered by human activity which has become a prey to entropy after the violence of war or of industrial exploitation (wherever it came from). Humanity reaching for the sublime through violence and beauty: the wall at the end is called death although the photographer sometimes shows us an open door in a bullet-ridden wall, a sign of freedom in the flight of a sea-gull (but don't they feed off dumps?). Exploring paradoxes, in exile on his own planet, afraid to call it home. How could anyone miss such a work, such a book? ...don't!