BN.com Gift Guide

Joseph Anton

( 22 )

Overview

On February 14, 1989, Valentine’s Day, Salman Rushdie was telephoned by a BBC journalist and told that he had been “sentenced to death” by the Ayatollah Khomeini. For the first time he heard the word fatwa. His crime? To have written a novel called The Satanic Verses, which was accused of being “against Islam, the Prophet and the Quran.”
 
So begins the extraordinary story of how a writer was forced underground, moving from house to house,...

See more details below
Audiobook (CD - Unabridged)
$54.00
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$60.00 List Price
Other sellers (Audiobook)
  • All (7) from $2.86   
  • New (2) from $25.64   
  • Used (5) from $2.86   
Joseph Anton

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$13.99
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

Overview

On February 14, 1989, Valentine’s Day, Salman Rushdie was telephoned by a BBC journalist and told that he had been “sentenced to death” by the Ayatollah Khomeini. For the first time he heard the word fatwa. His crime? To have written a novel called The Satanic Verses, which was accused of being “against Islam, the Prophet and the Quran.”
 
So begins the extraordinary story of how a writer was forced underground, moving from house to house, with the constant presence of an armed police protection team. He was asked to choose an alias that the police could call him by. He thought of writers he loved and combinations of their names; then it came to him: Conrad and Chekhov—Joseph Anton.
 
How do a writer and his family live with the threat of murder for more than nine years? How does he go on working? How does he fall in and out of love? How does despair shape his thoughts and actions, how and why does he stumble, how does he learn to fight back? In this remarkable memoir Rushdie tells that story for the first time; the story of one of the crucial battles, in our time, for freedom of speech. He talks about the sometimes grim, sometimes comic realities of living with armed policemen, and of the close bonds he formed with his protectors; of his struggle for support and understanding from governments, intelligence chiefs, publishers, journalists, and fellow writers; and of how he regained his freedom.
 
It is a book of exceptional frankness and honesty, compelling, provocative, moving, and of vital importance. Because what happened to Salman Rushdie was the first act of a drama that is still unfolding somewhere in the world every day.

Includes a prologue read by the Author.

Praise for Salman Rushdie
 
“In Salman Rushdie . . . India has produced a glittering novelist—one with startling imaginative and intellectual resources, a master of perpetual storytelling.”—The New Yorker
 
“Salman Rushdie has earned the right to be called one of our great storytellers.”—The Observer
 
“Our most exhilaratingly inventive prose stylist, a writer of breathtaking originality.”—Financial Timese prose stylist, a writer of breathtaking originality.”—Financial Times

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Audio
After a fatwa ordering his death was issued by Ayatollah Khomeini on Valentine’s Day in 1989, brilliant novelist Rushdie opted to take the first names of his two favorite writers and combine them into a pseudonym, in order to protect his identity. The result: Joseph Anton (from Joseph Conrad and Anton Chekov). Narrator Sam Dastor delivers an absolutely stellar reading of the memoir that recounts the life and times of the fictional Anton, through sometimes nightmarish events. Dastor’s British dialect is pitch perfect and finely tuned. His delivery is well paced and his character interpretations are inspired. Rushdie himself ably narrates the prologue. A Random House hardcover. (Sept.)
From the Publisher
“A harrowing, deeply felt and revealing document: an autobiographical mirror of the big, philosophical preoccupations that have animated Mr. Rushdie’s work throughout his career.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times
 
“A splendid book, the finest . . . memoir to cross my desk in many a year.”—Jonathan Yardley, The Washington Post
 
“Thoughtful and astute . . . an important book.”—USA Today
 
“Compelling, affecting . . . demonstrates Mr. Rushdie’s ability as a stylist and storytelle. . . . [He] reacted with great bravery and even heroism.”—The Wall Street Journal
 
“Gripping, moving and entertaining . . . nothing like it has ever been written.”—The Independent (UK)
 
“A thriller, an epic, a political essay, a love story, an ode to liberty.”—Le Point (France)
 
“Action-packed . . . in a literary class by itself . . . Like Isherwood, Rushdie’s eye is a camera lens —firmly placed in one perspective and never out of focus.”—Los Angeles Review of Books
 
“Unflinchingly honest . . . an engrossing, exciting, revealing and often shocking book.”de Volkskrant (The Netherlands)
 
“One of the best memoirs you may ever read.”DNA (India)
 
“Extraordinary . . . Joseph Anton beautifully modulates between . . . moments of accidental hilarity, and the higher purpose Rushdie saw in opposing—at all costs—any curtailment on a writer’s freedom.”The Boston Globe
The Washington Post
Joseph Anton is a splendid book, the finest new memoir to cross my desk in many a year. Some may complain that, at more than 600 pages, it is too long, but it never seemed so to me…To the contrary, the length of the book, and its wealth of quotidian detail, serve to draw the reader into the life that Rushdie was forced to lead, to make his isolation and fear palpable.
—Jonathan Yardley
The New York Times
…reminds us of [Rushdie's] fecund gift for language and his talent for explicating the psychological complexities of family and identity…a harrowing, deeply felt and revealing document: an autobiographical mirror of the big, philosophical preoccupations that have animated Mr. Rushdie's work throughout his career, from the collision of the private and the political in today's interconnected world to the permeable boundaries between life and art, reality and the imagination.
—Michiko Kakutani
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780449807811
  • Publisher: Random House Audio Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 9/18/2012
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Pages: 22
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 2.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Salman Rushdie
SALMAN RUSHDIE is the author of eleven previous novels--Luka and the Fire of Life, Grimus, Midnight's Children (for which he won the Booker Prize and the Best of the Booker), Shame, The Satanic Verses, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, The Moor's Last Sigh, The Ground Beneath Her Feet, Fury, Shalimar the Clown, and The Enchantress of Florence--and one collection of short stories, East, West. He has also published three works of nonfiction: The Jaguar Smile, Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991, and Step Across This Line, and coedited two anthologies, Mirrorwork and Best American Short Stories 2008. He is a former president of American PEN.

Biography

Born in Mumbai, India, and educated in the U.K., multi-award-winning novelist Salman Rushdie is considered one of the most important and influential writers of contemporary English-language fiction.

Rushdie freelanced for two London advertising firms before turning to a full-time writing career. He made his literary debut in 1975 with Grimus, a sci-fi fantasy that made a very small splash in publishing circles. However, he hit the jackpot with his second novel, Midnight's Children, an ambitious allegory that parallels the turbulent history of India before and after partition. Widely considered Rushdie's magnum opus, Midnight's Children was awarded the Booker Prize in 1981. (Twelve years later, a panel of judges named it the best overall novel to have won the Booker Prize since the award's inception in 1975; and in 2005, Time included it on a list of the 100 best English-language novels published since 1923.)

Undoubtedly, though, the book that put Rushdie squarely on the cultural radar screen was The Satanic Verses. Published in 1988 and partially inspired by the life of the prophet Muhammad, this erudite study of good and evil won the Whitbread Book Award, but achieved far more notoriety when Muslim fundamentalists condemned it for its blasphemous portrayal of Islam. The book was banned in many Muslim countries, a fatwa was issued by the Iranian Ayatollah, and a multimillion dollar bounty was placed on Rushdie's head. The novelist spent much of the 1990s in hiding, under the protection of the British government. (In 1998, Iran officially lifted the fatwa, but threats against Rushdie's life still reverberate throughout the Muslim world.)

Even without the controversy inspired by The Satanic Verses, Rushdie's literary fame would be assured. His novels comprise a unique body of work that draws from fantasy, mythology, religion, and magic realism, blending them all with staggering imagination and comic brilliance. He has created his own idiom, pushing the boundaries of language with dazzling wordplay and a widely admired "chutnification" of history. His books have won most major awards in Europe and the U.K. and have garnered praise from critics around the world. Britain's Financial Times called him "Our most exhilaratingly inventive prose stylist." Time magazine raved, "No novelist currently writing in English does so with more energy, intelligence and allusiveness than Rushdie." And the writer Christopher Hitchens lamented in the Progressive that were it not for the death threats against him, Rushdie would surely be a Nobel laureate by now.

In addition to his bestselling novels, Rushdie has also produced essays, criticism, and a book of children's fiction. In 2007, Rushdie was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II. The citation reads: "Ahmed Salman Rushdie -- author, for services to literature."

Good To Know

Rushdie was short-listed for The Literary Review's Bad Sex Award in 1995 for The Moor's Last Sigh, which included such verses as "For ever they sweated pepper ‘n' spices sweat."

Rushdie participated in a two-day, U.S. State Department conference entitled "Why Do They Hate Us?" for 50 diplomats in the wake of the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, D.C., on Sept. 11, 2001.

Rushdie's first novel was a literate sci-fi fantasy entitled Grimus. Although it made only a very small splash in publishing circles, the book was deemed outstanding enough to be selected by a panel of distinguished writers (including Brian Aldiss, Kingsley Amis, and Arthur C. Clarke) as the best science fiction novel of 1975. However, at the last minute, his publishers withdrew the book from consideration, fearing that, if he won, Rushdie would never be able to shake the label of "genre writer."

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      Ahmed Salman Rushdie
    2. Hometown:
      New York, New York
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 19, 1947
    2. Place of Birth:
      Bombay, Maharashtra, India
    1. Education:
      M.A. in History, King's College, University of Cambridge

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(12)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 18, 2012

    Moments ago, I turned the last page of Salman Rushdie's memoir,

    Moments ago, I turned the last page of Salman Rushdie's memoir, Joseph Anton. I started it around September 20th and it took me until December 17th, to finish (investing, on average, about an hour-and-a-half of reading per day). Some will consider this a long book (656 pages), but at no point in my journey did it seem overwritten or garrulous. Some memoirs tend to indulge in dull personal matters or mundane reminiscences, but not this one (Martin Amis wrote a particularly boring memoir that I found hard to finish; it turned out to be an 'experience' I could have done without). By the very nature of his circumstances, Rushdie's is a harrowing and riveting tale, and this made it all the more exciting to read.

    Please ignore the low-starred reviewers below; I doubt they have the ability to read any long book. Most people also seem to forget the purpose of a memoir when they describe its author as name-dropping, self-aggrandizing solipsists. In a memoir, YOU ARE SUPPOSED TO NAME NAMES. I want to know about Rushdie's literary friends, the movie stars he dated (Meg Ryan), and the places he has been to. What else do you expect? It's a memoir! At no point did Rushdie sound overly self-serving or whiny. He went through absolute hell for more than ten years of his life, all for writing a book that was perceived to be an insult to a ghastly and tyrannical religion. I think he has a right to complain a bit about the way he was treated by both the extremists abroad and the feeble British government at home. Despite this, he gives great credit to his protectors, the members of A Squad, and to all those to reached out to help during these troubling times. But he also shines a bright light on the toadies who attempted to cast him as a despicable devil in this whole ordeal. The British Press, Cat Stevens, John le Carre, Penguin Group; all of their positions were given a fair review and presented so that the reader can reach his/her own conclusions about who was in the wrong. Rushdie does not shy away from his own personal failings, nor does he try to sugarcoat anything. He reveals his personal faults that led to the end of his four marriages, but he also presents his side of the story effectively.

    If you don't want to hear about personal stories, literary jet-set circles, or someone's opinions on various issues, than don't read their memoir. If you are looking to learn more about one of the greatest authors of the 20th and 21 centuries, than check out Joseph Anton.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2012

    Recommended

    This lengthy book varies from engrossing to tedious at times. Its message, that freedom of speech and writing is important and should be more important than fear of offending, is compelling.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2012

    Too long and self-indulgent

    Rushdie's book is too long by at least one third. Do we really need to read the guest list at every party he attended, especially since most of the folks he mentions are from England and hardly known in this country. Too much repetition about the security that helped him survive. Not enough information about his marriages, which is perhaps the only really interesting material in the book.
    It is also seriously marred by his use of the third person rather than the first person.
    This is a good book to skim so you can skip the considerable uninteresting portions. .

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2012

    Excellent Biography

    A fascinating biography of the arduous ordeal Mr. Rushdie faced for too many years. What a struggle for freedom!!!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 11, 2013

    Surprisingly readable

    Having tried to read and understand "The Satanic Verses" I did not expect to finish "Joseph Anton" but was delighted to find Salman Rushdies memoir fascinating reading; and a trove of background information to help me to understand his writing. I will try "Verses" again from a new perspective.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2012

    Read it

    I've seldom had time to read fiction, and so have yet to read any of Salman Rushdie's other work. Based on the beautiful writing in this book, I will get right to it. I was interested in his story because of the ordeal he lived through when he was under threat of death, and found his lessons about life valuable and inspiring. I am glad he survived, and grateful that he and his supportive friends work for freedom for writers around the world.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2012

    YAY!!!!!!!

    BEST BOOK EVER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2014

    Nnkx

    Mskxjsjjzbbzuhgvxhicokfffkcmbun

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2013

    Over long but well worth the read

    An inspiring and at times reflective and indulgent memoir.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2013

    Seahawks

    Awesome

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2012

    500 + pages of whining. Book describes a shallow person who thro

    500 + pages of whining. Book describes a shallow person who throws away wives & blames all his problems on others.

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)