Joseph Had a Little Overcoat

( 35 )

Overview


Joseph had a little overcoat, but it was full of holes—just like this book! When Joseph's coat got too old and shabby, he made it into a jacket. But what did he make it into after that? And after that?

As children turn the pages of this book, they can use the die-cut holes to guess what Joseph will be making next from his amazing overcoat, while they laugh at the bold, cheerful artwork and learn that you can ...

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Overview


Joseph had a little overcoat, but it was full of holes—just like this book! When Joseph's coat got too old and shabby, he made it into a jacket. But what did he make it into after that? And after that?

As children turn the pages of this book, they can use the die-cut holes to guess what Joseph will be making next from his amazing overcoat, while they laugh at the bold, cheerful artwork and learn that you can always make something, even out of nothing.

Winner of the 2000 Caldecott Award.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
As in his Caldecott Honor book, There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly, Taback's inventive use of die-cut pages shows off his signature artwork, here newly created for his 1977 adaptation of a Yiddish folk song. This diverting, sequential story unravels as swiftly as the threads of Joseph's well-loved, patch-covered plaid coat. A flip of the page allows children to peek through to subsequent spreads as Joseph's tailoring produces items of decreasing size. The author puts a droll spin on his narrative when Joseph loses the last remnant of the coat--a button--and decides to make a book about it. "Which shows...you can always make something out of nothing," writes Taback, who wryly slips himself into his story by depicting Joseph creating a dummy for the book that readers are holding. Still, it's the bustling mixed-media artwork, highlighted by the strategically placed die-cuts, that steals the show. Taback works into his folk art a menagerie of wide-eyed animals witnessing the overcoat's transformation, miniature photographs superimposed on paintings and some clever asides reproduced in small print a wall hanging declares, "Better to have an ugly patch than a beautiful hole"; a newspaper headline announces, "Fiddler on Roof Falls off Roof". With its effective repetition and an abundance of visual humor, this is tailor-made for reading aloud. All ages. Oct. Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature - Children's Literature
What do you do with an overcoat that is torn and worn but that is so dear that you can't toss it out? Cut it down, trim it and turn it into something else. That's just what Simms Taback does in his Caldecott Medal book Joseph Had a Little Overcoat. Taback has clothed this well-known tale with comic characters, bold colors and a die-cut on each page to highlight the journey from coat to button to memory. The only thing left is to tell the story. Each page is enriched with details appreciated more by adults than children--for example, a newspaper headline reads "Fiddler On Roof Falls Off Roof" or "Chelm Rabbi Knows Why the Ocean is Salty" (It's due to the herring)! Family pictures adorn the walls and peer out of apartment windows, Yiddish newspapers lying on the floor, books with authors such as Sholom Aleichem and I.L. Peretz all vie for attention and inspire adults to share this book with their children and grandchildren. The music is included at the end of the book. 1999, Viking, Ages 4 to Adult, $15.99. Reviewer: Jan Lieberman
School Library Journal
Pre-Gr 3-A book bursting at the seams with ingenuity and creative spirit. When Joseph's overcoat becomes "old and worn," he snips off the patches and turns it into a jacket. When his jacket is beyond repair, he makes a vest. Joseph recycles his garments until he has nothing left. But by trading in his scissors for a pen and paintbrush he creates a story, showing "you can always make something out of nothing." Clever die-cut holes provide clues as to what Joseph will make next: windowpanes in one scene become a scarf upon turning the page. Striking gouache, watercolor, and collage illustrations are chock-full of witty details-letters to read, proverbs on the walls, even a fiddler on the roof. Taback adapted this tale from a Yiddish folk song and the music and English lyrics are appended. The rhythm and repetition make it a perfect storytime read-aloud.-Linda Ludke, London Public Library, Ontario, Canada Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780670878550
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/15/2000
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 65,691
  • Age range: 3 - 7 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.88 (w) x 10.76 (h) x 0.42 (d)

Meet the Author


Simms Taback grew up in the Bronx and graduated from Cooper Union. He has worked as an art director and a graphic designer, and has taught at the School of Visual Arts and Syracause University. He has illustrated many children's books, including I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly (Viking), Spacy Riddles, Snakey Riddles, Buggy Riddles, and Fishy Riddles (all written by Katy Hall and lIsa Eisenberg, Dial). His work has won many awards, including the Caldecott Honor Award Medal for I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly and a New York Times Best Illustrated Children's Book. A father of three and grandfather of three, Mr. Taback lives with his wife in Willow, New York copyright ? 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 35 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(27)

4 Star

(7)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 35 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2013

    good story

    My daughter loves this story. She would ask me to read over and over again.

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  • Posted January 16, 2010

    Simple but many-layered.

    Moral of story is optomism. Charming and fun for any age. Also teaches provident living.

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  • Posted October 4, 2009

    "PURE-D-FUN" and so much more!

    A wonderful tale for any child who has to deal with loss of favorite blanket or outfit--this story is a treasure for any and all who love Jewish traditions and culture--read just for fun or let it stimulate real and memorable discussion on making something meaningful out of seeming loss

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 28, 2009

    Colorful, Unforgetable

    I think this book could become a classic, if it had a bigger display at book stores. I never saw it, until Great Grandma gave it as a gift, to her Great grandchild. I reccomend it highly.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2009

    unforgettable

    a true life lesson that is fun and memerable

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2007

    Wonderful book!

    We love this book! I hadn't heard of it until a friend bought it for my daughter and it is really special. I brought it for my grandmother to read to my daughter and it was such a special book to share between generations. My grandmother loved the Yiddish sayings in the illustrations. And the illustrations are so beautiful. I highly recommend this book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2007

    Review

    Simmis Taback won the Caldecott Medal in 2000 for Joseph Had A Little Overcoat. He won a Caldecott Honor for his book There was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly. He lives and works in the Catskill Mountains in upstate New York. Joseph had an overcoat that he had worn for a long time. He did not want to throw it away, so he made a jacket out of it. He kept the jacket for a long time, and then made something else out of it. Joseph kept making different things out of his overcoat because he did not want to throw it away. Finally he made a button, and lost it. Then, he decides to do something else.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2007

    Joseph had a little overcoat.

    Joseph had a over coat that was all ratty and tore. What could he do with it. he didn't want to get rid of it so he found a way to make it into something else. 'Joseph had a little overcoat, but it was old and worn.' 'So he made a Jacket out of it.' What else can Joseph do with the overcoat? Will it ever disappear? Read and you will find out. Simms Tadack has won the Caldecott Honor Medal for there was an old lady who swollowed a fly. He lives in the catskill moutians in upstate new york. I realy enjoy this book and it is on a 1st grade reading level. This show children that you can have something forever if you just use your imagination. Taback, Simmons. JOSEPH HAD A LITTLE OVERCOAT. New York Viking, 1977.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2007

    Joseph's overcoat

    This is a Caldecott Medal Winner. This is a story that would be appropriate for children ages 4-8. This is a great story to read to young children because it teaches them that there is a use for everything. It teaches children not to take things for granted. This is a story about a boy named Joseph who had an over coat. When it got old and was torn he made it into a jacket. ¿He made a jacket out of it and went to the fair¿. When the jacket became worn he turned it into a vest. Each time that the garment became tattered he didn¿t throw it away he created a way to still use the piece of clothing. When the vest becomes torn what will Joseph to with it next? The author is Simms Taback. He has written many children¿s books and one other has received a Caldecott Honor award. Mr. Taback lives in upstate New York. Taback, Simms. Joseph had a Little Overcoat. New York: Viking, 1977.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2007

    Joseph Had a Little Overcoat Review

    Caldecott Book Title: Joseph Had a Little Overcoat Reading Level: Pre-School ¿ Kindergarten Genre: Fiction About the Author: Simms Taback won a Caldecott Hone Medal for his book There was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly, which also featured an innovative die-cut format. It received a Parent¿s Choice Gold Award, a Parenting Certificate of Excellence, and was chosen a New York Times Best Illustrated Book of 1997. He lives and works in the Catskill Mountains in upstate New York. Book Review: Joseph Had a Little Overcoat is about a man named Joseph who had an overcoat, but it was full of holes. When his coat got too old and worn, he made it into a jacket. Then the jacket got old and worn ¿so he made a vest out of it and danced at his nephew¿s wedding.¿ When his vest got old and worn he made it into a scarf. Joseph continues to make something different out of the item that gets worn and old. ¿Joseph had a little handkerchief. It got old and worn. So he made a button out of it and used it to fasten his suspenders.¿ The moral of this story is that you can make something out of nothing. I believe young readers will really enjoy this delightful story. Bibliographic Information: Taback, Simms. Joseph Had a Little Overcoat. New York: Viking a Member of Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers, 1999.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2007

    Joseph Had a Little Overcoat

    Simms Taback has captured the imagination of many children with his many wonderful picture books. He has illustrated over 35 books including one of my very favorite books, There Was An Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly, which was a Caldecott honor book in 1998. He has also given us the Happy Meal box. That¿s right Simms Taback was the designer and illustrator of the very first McDonalds Happy Meal box. Among the many books that he has illustrated and created is Joseph Had A Little Overcoat. This book won the Caldecott medal in 2000. It is a very cute story of a man named Joseph who wears his overcoat until it gets holes in it. When it gets holes he decides to cut it up and make a vest out of it. When the vest gets worn he decides to make a handkerchief out of it. He continues to make smaller and smaller pieces of clothing. What will he do when he gets to the end of the fabric? This is a delightful book to read with or to children. I loved it. It reminded me of my favorite book There Was An Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly. Taback wrote the book to show that you can always make something even out of nothing. Taback, Simms. Joseph Had a Little Overcoat. New York. Viking, 1999. Reading Level 1.7

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2007

    a fun book to read

    Taback Simms, Joseph had a little over coat, published by the penguin group new York, new your 1999 This book is very interesting. It can be used to teach motorization and sequence learning. It is a fun way to see how things can start out as one thing but through time be made in to something completely new and different. The children will have fun trying to figure out what the last object the Joseph makes when he has nothing left. It can be used to teach a valuable lesson that you can always make something out of nothing.. I enjoyed the book it had fun colors and playful pictures. The reading level was 3.I think many children will enjoy this book and there are many activity¿s that could be done with the students using this book It wasn't until he began to create the Caldecott-winning book, Joseph Had a Little Overcoat 'Viking', that he experienced something quite different. It turned into a personal journey of artistic expression and discovery that he had not expected. Joseph Had a Little Overcoat is a story set in a world he had heard so much about as a child, filled with memories of family and of a thriving culture that no longer exists. It was adapted from a Yiddish folk song and is a good example of Yiddishkayt, meaning 'Jewish life' or 'Jewish world-view.' It embodies the values and struggles of life in the Shtetl, the small villages. The Kohn 'or Cohen' family lived in one of these villages where his Zada, his grandfather, Meyer Kohn, earned his living as a blacksmith. The author use the Kohn name in the book as Joseph's family name Yiddish was his first language. When he started school, he forgot all the Yiddish he knew as a child. He id a great deal of learning and research to relearn what he once knew. Simms Taback grew up in New York City and pursued a varied career in the applied arts as a graphic designer, advertising agency art director, and a partner in a design/illustration office. His illustration and design work has been cited by the Society of Illustrators, Art Directors Club, American Institute of Graphic Arts 'AIGA', and the Greeting Card Association.Simms has illustrated about thirty-five books for children. His work has been twice selected for the New York Times Best Illustrated Book Award and his adaptation of There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly was chosen as a Caldecott Honor Book for 1998.¿so he made a jacket out of it and went to the fair¿ Joseph had a little scarf, it got old and worn¿ you can always make something of nothing. Hey kids how can you turn coat in to a button. How can you turn nothing in to something. Read this book and find out.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2007

    Caldecott Medal Winner!

    Joseph makes many articles of clothing out of an overcoat that is worn out. When these articles of clothing start looking old and worn out, he makes a different article of clothing that he can use. When Joseph loses the last part of his overcoat, the button, he makes a last surprising find. Can you make something out of nothing? Reading level 4-8. Fantasy Fiction. Tabach, Simms. Joseph Had a Little Overcoat. NY: Viking. 1999.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2007

    Joseph Had a Little Overcoat

    The book, ¿Joseph Had a Little Overcoat,¿ by Simms Taback was originally published in 1977, but was published again in 1999 because Taback felt that his first publication of the book could be better. Taback was born in 1932 in Bronx, New York. Throughout his life, he has written and illustrated many children books. He originally wanted to pursue a degree in engineering, but his artistic skill took over. His book, ¿Joseph Had a Little Overcoat,¿ is about a guy named Joseph who had an overcoat that was old, torn, and shabby. Throughout the book, Joseph makes good use out of his old and worn coat. First Joseph takes his old overcoat and makes a jacket out of it, and then after his jacket gets old and shabby, Joseph becomes creative and makes a vest. After the vest is old and worn, Joseph then makes a scarf. Each time, Joseph takes the same piece of fabric and makes it into something else that is useful. What will Joseph, with his creative thinking, make next? At the end of the book, what do you think the old and shabby overcoat will become? Taback did an amazing job with this book. Not only did he use attractive illustrations to grasp the reader¿s attention, but he also wrote the book in a simple, pleasurable way. The illustrations are done in vibrant colors, and the images appear to be realistic although they are drawn in a cartoon image. Tabacks collage technique also makes the book very appealing. At the end of the book, Taback writes ¿You can always make something out of nothing.¿ I think this is an excellent quote from the book because it is a good moral lesson towards children. It also teaches a child that useless things can be recycled and used again. Taback, without a doubt, deserved the Caldecott Medal for this wonderful book. The reading level for this book is first grade. Taback, Simms. Joseph Had a Little Overcoat. New York: Viking, 1999.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2007

    Joseph had a Little Overcoat

    Joseph starts out with a worn out overcoat. From there he uses his creativity to make different things till ... he loses it. But wait! He has one last idea. What can you make with nothing? Well, you'll have to read to find out. This was truely a cute book. The one to two sentence pages makes it an easy read for the younger ages. But the moral of the story 'you can always make something out of nothing' makes it a great book for all ages. Simms Taback was the author and illustrator of this book, recieved a Caldecott Medal for this book. The pages were colorful and the 'die-cut' format added to the book. I feel he definitly deserved the Caldecott Medal. Taback, Simms. Joseph Had a Little Overcoat. NY: Penguin Putnam. 1999.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2006

    Joseph Had a Little Overcoat

    The Caldecott Award Winner titled Joseph Had a Little Overcoat is a great classic picture book for the younger audiences. This picture book would be suitable for children ages four to eight. It would also be a great beginner book for children who are starting to read. The characters in this picture book are static and don¿t essentially change. The illustrations in this book are colorful and eye catching for the reader and the audience. In fact, the illustrations in this picture book practically stand out of the pages. The plot of the story is coherent as well as cumulative which also catches the younger audience¿s attention because its simple. Another great characteristic of this picture book is the lesson it teaches. The moral of the story is announced at the ending of the book which states ¿You can always make something out of nothing¿. Simms Taback has won additional awards for one of his books titled There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly, which won a Caldecott Honor Medal in addition to Parents` Choice Gold Award. Taback¿s books have been very popular with the younger readers. Taback, Simms. Joseph Had a Little Overcoat. New York, The Penguin Group. 1977.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2006

    Joseph's coat

    Simms Taback¿s Joseph Had a Little Overcoat is a brilliant and educational book for children. Simms writes of Joseph whom he portrays as himself. When he was a little boy, Simms had a favorite song that was about an over coat. In this story Joseph has an old ragged coat that when it gets so wore that he can¿t use anymore him makes it into something new. Over and over from a coat to a jacket from a jacket to vest, then into a scarf, then to a tie and when the tie wore out he made it into a handkerchief. When the handkerchief was all worn, torn, and ragged he made it into a button to help hold up his suspenders. But then Joseph misplaced the button and had nothing left to make anything knew. Joseph took something out of nothing and wrote a book about it. Simms sends a strong message to children that ¿something can be made out of nothing¿. Taback, Simms. Joseph Had a Little Overcoat. New York: Penguin Group Publishing, 1999

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2006

    You can make something out of nothing!

    This book is not only adorable, but it has a great theme as well. ¿Joseph had a little overcoat and it became old and worn¿. His overcoat transformed into smaller and smaller items until he lost it. He had nothing or did he? Remember, ¿you can make something out of nothing.¿ This book is an inspiration to children by teaching them to not give up and use their creativity and imagination. Mr. Taback wrote a note at the end explaining how he changed his favorite song into a book. You can indeed make something out of nothing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2006

    joseph had a little overcoat

    Joseph Had a Little Overcoat is a Caldecott medal winner. Joseph had an over coat that was old and torn. When Joseph¿s coat got to old and shabby, he made it into a jacket. ¿..he made a jacket out of it and went to the fair.¿ After Joseph¿s jacket go old and torn he made a vest. Each time it got old he made good use of it. What will the overcoat end up being? This book would be good for grades 1-4. I loved this book. This book helps children learn that there is a use for everything. This book is a realistic fiction book. The author Simms Taback has written many children¿s books. He also received a Caldecott Honor medal for his book, There was an old lady who swallowed a fly. Taback lives and works in the Catskill Mountains in upstate New York. Taback, Simms. Joseph Had a Little Overcoat. New York: Viking, 1977.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2006

    Wonderful life lesson!

    Joseph starts out with a little overcoat and changes it into a jacket. He does not want to throw it away if it gets worn he wants to change it into something else. So he goes from a jacket to a vest then to a scarf then to a tie and then to a handkerchief and then finally to a button. Joseph did like he said and kept reusing the material. But Joseph ¿lost his button and then had nothing.¿ So he made a book about it which shows you that ¿you can always make something out of nothing.¿

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