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Journalist
     

Journalist

by Sherry Bonnice
 

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Find out what it takes to be a journalist with character… Journalists have many career areas from which to choose. Some of the most common include: News reporter; Editor; Investigative reporter; Magazine writer; Freelance writer; and, Foreign correspondent. Most employers in this field require experience as well as education, and equally important is

Overview

Find out what it takes to be a journalist with character… Journalists have many career areas from which to choose. Some of the most common include: News reporter; Editor; Investigative reporter; Magazine writer; Freelance writer; and, Foreign correspondent. Most employers in this field require experience as well as education, and equally important is character. Without the core qualities of a good character, journalists' work does not benefit those it serves. That's why journalists need: integrity to report a story accurately…compassion and respect for human beings who need their stories told…and courage to face dangerous situations and withstand pressure. Journalists have the power to fight injustice, ignorance, poverty, and prejudice. Journalist will show you how.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Journalist is a book in the "Careers with Character" series. It opens up with an introduction by two educational consultants on what the book contains followed by nine chapters on different aspects of the career choice. First, job requirements is examined, then integrity and trustworthiness, respect and compassion, justice and fairness, responsibility, courage, self-discipline and diligence, citizenship, and career opportunities. Each chapter presents a role model and story. The chapter on respect and compassion highlights a reporter called Nellie Bly who lived in the 1800's. Nellie began her journalism career at the age of eighteen when she wrote to the Pittsburgh Dispatch that had printed an article called, "What Girls Are Good For." Nellie did not like this view that girls should stay at home, have babies, and not be concerned with the world at large. She explained how she had helped to support her family after her father's death. In response to this letter, Nellie was offered a job at the newspaper. Nellie covered stories that taught her respect and compassion for people less fortunate than herself. She traveled to Mexico and reported on the poor living conditions, thus bringing attention to this part of the world. Nellie loved to write, but her journalism career also enabled her to help others. A pertinent sidebar beside this story provides a list of requirements needed to show respect and compassion for others. Another chapter looks at career opportunities for journalists, annual earnings, and a code of ethics that journalists should possess. The interesting case histories chosen by author Sherry Bonnice make this a well-worth addition to any public library or personal library.Color and black and white illustrations are included, as well as further reading material, a glossary, and internet web sites. 2003, Mason Crest Publishers
— Della A. Yannuzzi
Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
Based heavily on a formula developed by the Character Counts Coalition (an organization founded by lawyer and motivational speaker Michael Josephson), this “Careers with Character” series focuses on various professions that require education or training. While specifying education and experience necessary for a career in journalism, Bonnice devotes a chapter each to the qualities selected by the Coalition as benchmarks for developing good character in journalists. Integrity and trustworthiness are first, followed by respect and compassion, where readers meet historical reporter Nellie Bly (first crusading female journalist) and Pulitzer Prize-winner (1937) Anne McCormick. Justice is exemplified by the career of Ida Tarbell, who traced the story of Standard Oil’s illegal monopoly for McClure’s magazine (influential colleagues like Lincoln Steffens are not mentioned). Award-wining broadcaster Peter Jennings represents responsibility along with Canadian anchor Kevin Newman, while courage finds its exemplar in Terry Anderson, who endured with grace six years of imprisonment by Hezbollah in Lebanon. Robert Woodward and Carl Bernstein are chosen to represent self-discipline and diligence for searching out Watergate secrets. Finally, citizenship is defined as loyalty to all peoples of the world and exemplified by Dexter Filkins, perceptive foreign correspondent in Afghanistan and Iraq. Bonnice concludes that, with the cyber revolution, prospects are not too bright for print journalists unless they specialize in science and technology. Though Journalist contains some useful information, the writing is pedantic and repetitious; illustrations are often irrelevant (a color photo of a delete button), badly captioned, or posed for by models rather than real journalists. Large green sidebars too often interrupt the text, breaking its continuity. Stilted writing and sloppy editing, design, and picture selection keep this volume from being as appealing to teens as the publisher intends. Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft; Ages 12 up.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781422227589
Publisher:
Mason Crest Publishers
Publication date:
09/28/2013
Series:
Careers with Character Series
Pages:
96
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
1090L (what's this?)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

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