The Journalist's Craft: A Guide to Writing Better Stories [NOOK Book]

Overview

This inspiring collection of 19 essays from veteran news writers explains how to weave storytelling skills into nonfiction narratives. Journalists of all backgrounds and levels of experience will discover dozens of exercises that have been tested successfully in newsrooms, workshops, and classrooms, and will cover everything from the fundamentals of reporting, writing and revising to more specialized elements like creating rhythm, cadence, and voice; employing dialogue and scene-building; and such devices as ...
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The Journalist's Craft: A Guide to Writing Better Stories

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Overview

This inspiring collection of 19 essays from veteran news writers explains how to weave storytelling skills into nonfiction narratives. Journalists of all backgrounds and levels of experience will discover dozens of exercises that have been tested successfully in newsrooms, workshops, and classrooms, and will cover everything from the fundamentals of reporting, writing and revising to more specialized elements like creating rhythm, cadence, and voice; employing dialogue and scene-building; and such devices as foreshadowing, symbols, and metaphors. Contributors are all veteran journalists, including Mark Bowden, author of Black Hawk Down, and several Pulitzer Prize-winners.
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Editorial Reviews

Christopher Scanlan
This brilliant collection of essays is a feast of inspiration and advice offered up by Pulitzer Prize-inning journalists, successful authors and top editors, writing teachers and newsroom coaches. With lessons on nearly every page, it's a writing toolbox jammed with practical tips, invaluable insights, and exciting techniques and theories to try out on your next story. If you want to take your writing to the next level, this book belongs on your desk.
Reporting and Writing the News
Geneva Overholser
The truth is, I sat down to skim this book as a blurb-writer will, words like 'rich compilation of writing advice' already forming in my head. Forget it. From Hugh Mulligan's opener on 'The Writing Life' to Dennis Jackson on cadence to Lynn Franklin on 'literary theft,' this book is full of delights. But the most remarkable is this: It will leave you itching to write.
Washington Post
William Woo
'Good writing depends on good reporting the way human life depends on oxygen,'" says Ken Fuson. So this is a book not just about writing well. It's about reporting accurately, about understanding detail, about hearing and seeing, and most of all about thinking your way through a story, from beginning to end. It's storytelling about storytelling from some masters in the business.
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Bob Baker
This book feels real. It's rooted in the messy little struggle that every reporter goes through with every story. The fact that you witness the battle through the eyes of so many experts makes you appreciate how many ways there are to solve the riddle of storytelling, and increases your resolve to do battle again and again until you get it right.
Los Angeles Times and author, Newsthinking
Melvin L. Claxton
On the surface, the task of a journalist appears simple: Tell the truth in a compelling way that will hold the interest of readers. The pursuit of this goal is an art form perfected by the writers represented in this book. From crafting moving narratives to writing powerful investigative reports, this book offers insights and techniques from some of the best in the news business.
Detroit News and 1995 Pulitzer Prizewinner for Public Service Reporting
Booknews
Jackson (journalism and English, U. of Delaware) and Sweeney (Public Editor, , Wilmington, Delaware) present a collection of practitioner-penned articles on various aspects of the journalist act of "telling the story." The contributions are organized into sections on finding stories, writing nonfiction narrative, developing the craft, and working with words. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781581159752
  • Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing
  • Publication date: 2/28/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 937,790
  • File size: 800 KB

Table of Contents

Preface: Creative InsecurityJim Naughton
Introduction: A "Few Words" for Fellow Writers Dennis Jackson and John Sweeney
Section I: The Writing Life
Breaking Out from the Herd Hugh A. Mulligan
Section II: Finding Good Stories
Testing Your Ideas: Ten Pre-Proposal Checks Amanda Bennett
Tammy Gaudette Wants Real Stories Ken Fuson
Are Plumbers News? What Makes a Story a Story? John Sweeney
Section III: Writing Nonfiction Narrative
The Narrative Tool Jon Franklin
Nonfiction Storytelling Mark Bowden
Narrative Writing Donald Drake
Section IV: Developing Your Craft
In Search of the Magic Bullet Richard Aregood
The Zen of Newswriting Lucille S. deView
Literary Theft: Taking Techniques from the Classics Lynn Franklin
Business Writing That Screams "Read Me!" Tom Silvestri
Managing the Murky Middle Carl Sessions Stepp
SpellCheck and Beyond: A Strategy for Revision John Sweeney
Section V: Working with Words
These Things We Can Count On Taylor Buckley
Speaking of Metaphor Jeanne Murray Walker
Rhythm's Cousin, Cadence Dennis Jackson
A "StyleCheck" for Your Writing Dennis Jackson
Books about Writing
Contributors Notes
Index
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2012

    Caged

    Chapter 1: Taken- I wake up to hear distant marching footsteps. Today's Cell Block would be emptied, its occupants taken to the Compound. My Cell Block is #24. We aren't chosen in order. That would take the fun out of things, right? I look around the empty gray room. Empty except for the teenagers, that is. Tons of us. I'm 16. 13-19 year olds are held in this Sector. The other Sector holds 5-12year olds. Below that age are the Un-Altered. They are experimented on, tested. They come out morphed, different. But they don't discover their Alterations until after they reach the Compound. So that they're safe, I was told at the child Sector. But I know better. It's so that they can't escape. We're Altered so that adults can see what may happen to genetically-morphed people. The footsteps get closer. I listen intently. The marching stops outside our Cell Block. I stiffen. It's our turn. The door that only opens on the outside slides away. Soldiers march in. They're all full-grown adults. The soldiers tie each of our hands behind our backs with a flexible metal material, like rope braided from iron. The soldiers shove us out, herding us in a big group. I look around at the gray buildings on either side of me, lined up. The sky is gray, the ground is gray. I look around to see teens peering from the 2 windows in front of each building. The soldier shoves me forward. I drop my head and shuffle on. We leave the rows of buildings, and come across a huge, dark gray building. The soldiers force us all inside. **********
    We're all standing in a huge gray room with a set of massive double doors on one wall. "Line up!" Booms a soldier. We obey, lining up shoulder to shoulder. Another soldier walks up and looks on something on the underside each teen's wrist. The tatoo. All of us have one, but not all are the same. He reports to the Sergant what each tatoo means. The soldier comes to me. He gruffly grabs my tied wrists and turns them over, revealing my tatoo. A dragon with a pair of wings slightly extended. "Avian-hybrid, dragon-speaker." He growls and moves on. I blink. What does that mean? Finally, he finishes, leaving me wondering. The soldiers unbound our wrists and lead us to the doors. Two guards open the doors and step aside. The soldiers march us through, and through a huge, open electric fence. They throw us in and shut the fence. We're in a huge grassland. As soon as the gates close, we shake off our confusion and bolt into the wilderness. I wander for a while, curious about everything here. That's when I hear the scream.
    -Wild Fire

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2012

    Lilyfang

    Good!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2012

    Skystars sceret new one chapter one

    Sky looked outside. The frozen hill was coverd in snow and all te beautiful flowers were gone. This is gonna be a long winter she thought. "Hey sky wanna go outside" Cloud wisperd to Sky. She looked over at Cinder their mother. She was a red shecat th bright blue eyes and a long scar across her body. "But mom said we couldn't" Sky reminded. Cinder has refused to let any of then leave this house but leave it up to Cloud to get anyone in trouble. "So.... we'll sneak in before mom ven botices were gone." Cloud mewed. Cinder licked her scar and padded of to their twolegs room where their twlegs wuld pet them for their and her enjoyment but to Sky it wasn't that enjoyable. Sky found nothing wrong with that idea an followed Sun and Cloud outsode. Cloud was hite and puffy with bright blue eyes and Sun was golden with organg stripes and red eyes but Sun was the nicest cat in the twoleg place. The cold chilled Skys blue-gray fur. She had greenish-grayish eyes. Cloud sniffed around. The snowflakes fell all over none the same. "I told you to stay in" an angy voice yowled. "Oh no its mom hide" Sub mewed as the cats dived into hideing spots...

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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