The Journey to the East

The Journey to the East

3.6 13
by Hermann Hesse
     
 

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In simple, mesmerizing prose, Hermann Hesse's Journey to the East tells of a journey both geographic and spiritual. H.H., a German choirmaster, is invited on an expedition with the League, a secret society whose members include Paul Klee, Mozart, and Albertus Magnus. The participants traverse both space and time, encountering Noah's Ark in Zurich and Don

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Overview

In simple, mesmerizing prose, Hermann Hesse's Journey to the East tells of a journey both geographic and spiritual. H.H., a German choirmaster, is invited on an expedition with the League, a secret society whose members include Paul Klee, Mozart, and Albertus Magnus. The participants traverse both space and time, encountering Noah's Ark in Zurich and Don Quixote at Bremgarten. The pilgrims' ultimate destination is the East, the "Home of the Light," where they expect to find spiritual renewal. Yet the harmony that ruled at the outset of the trip soon degenerates into open conflict. Each traveler finds the rest of the group intolerable and heads off in his own direction, with H.H. bitterly blaming the others for the failure of the journey. It is only long after the trip, while poring over records in the League archives, that H.H. discovers his own role in the dissolution of the group, and the ominous significance of the journey itself.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312421687
Publisher:
Picador
Publication date:
02/01/2003
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
128
Sales rank:
185,041
Product dimensions:
6.25(w) x 8.13(h) x 0.43(d)

Meet the Author

Hermann Hesse was born in Germany in 1877 and later became a citizen of Switzerland. As a Western man profoundly affected by the mysticism of Eastern thought, he wrote novels, stories, and essays bearing a vital spiritual force that has captured the imagination and loyalty of many generations of readers. His works include Steppenwolf, Narcissus and Goldmund, and The Glass Bead Game. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1946. Hermann Hesse died in 1962.

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The Journey To The East 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So they after me it's not available in nook After I just paid for it. I would give zero stars if I could.
jamie3 More than 1 year ago
This is my all-time favorite book! I wish it was available on nook, as I lent out my hard copy and never got it back!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Reading this book is like taking a journey yourself. It seems to become predictable at one point, but hang on, the ending will blow you away.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really liked this book, it kept me transfixed and it stimulated my mind. It also gave me hope for our human culture. It says we are not only about industry and making money. There are actually life missons by peaceful souls aching for the human experience that the natural,with out the frills, with out the technology; An urge to discover the spiritual, the mystical. But I have to say, maybe I am not spiritually in tune with the message that the ending reveals, because I did not understand it at all. What is the deal with the statue??
Guest More than 1 year ago
A short marvolous book to be read in one night. Hesse continually keeps you thiking. Some mystical elements are present... the book should be titled 'reflections on a journey to the east' because no journey takes place, only a reflection of a youthful journey by secret societies; I will not spoil the stunning ending for you. a delight for the religous tempermante.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Journey to the East probably isn't within the canon of required reading at most schools and universities. However, it is an excellent story for discussion, especially for comparitive interpretation with works like Kafka's 'The Trial' and some of Borges' Ficciones.