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The Journey (Kentucky Brothers Series #1)
     

The Journey (Kentucky Brothers Series #1)

4.2 45
by Wanda E. Brunstetter
 

See All Formats & Editions

Now a New York Times and USA Today Besteller! Discover along with Titus Fisher how life can begin anew in Christian County, Kentucky. Moving from Pennsylvania, finding rewarding work, and leaving a broken romance behind is the best decision Titus ever made. But is he ready to consider love again when he meets two women: one who seems perfectly suited for

Overview

Now a New York Times and USA Today Besteller! Discover along with Titus Fisher how life can begin anew in Christian County, Kentucky. Moving from Pennsylvania, finding rewarding work, and leaving a broken romance behind is the best decision Titus ever made. But is he ready to consider love again when he meets two women: one who seems perfectly suited for any Amish man and one who challenges long held ideas of the woman’s role. Who will Titus choose, and will it be the right choice?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Brunstetter (A Sister's Hope) sets her latest among the Kentucky Amish; the story may have moved, but the rest of the Amish plot is pretty familiar. Titus Fisher's heart is broken after his girlfriend, Phoebe Stoltzfus, who can't commit to him or to the Amish faith, moves to California. Englischer and family friend Allen Walters is passing through Lancaster County, Pa., to Kentucky, and he happens to know of an available job for a carpenter. So off go Titus and Allen to Kentucky, where Titus meets Suzanne Yoder, a young Amish woman who can't cook but who can do woodworking, and who painfully resembles Phoebe. There's growing and forgiving to do, as well as a fair amount of eating. Some of the plot complications are sensibly organic—Phoebe's return is logical. Others are purely arbitrary—stolen money in Titus's telephone shed—and verge on amateur. Yet given the appetite for Amish fiction, publishers haven't yet hit the limit for shoofly pies. While she's not the best of the bonnet bunch, Brunstetter's been at this a while now, and her readership will wilkom this. (Apr.)
Goodreads

This story was very sweet and I just loved Titus and Pheobe. I was a little confused by some of the characters in Lancaster, it seemed that I was missing something and I now realize Wanda E. Brunstetter has many Amish stories out and it seems they are characters from previous books. It did not take away from the story, it just makes me want to pick up some of the previous novels. This was a nice, clean christian book that was a refreshing read.

— Denise Schirmuhly

Lori Adams

I really loved this story. You can usually tell in stories like this that if the guy starts out hating the girl they usually end up together, but I was really left guessing who he would pick until the end. The story also contains a mystery about some money that is found that I found really interesting too. I liked seeing how Titus really grew throughout the book and started really find his way in life. He included God in helping him make those decisions and I think that really helped him in the end. Suzanne also grows in this story and people learn to accept her for who she really is and not who she is expected to be. I really loved this story and would recommend it to people who enjoy Amish fiction or inspirational fiction.
Good Reads

I enjoyed reading sort of a continuation of the Fisher family from the Daughters of Lancaster County series. I liked that this story focused on one of the twins. Suzanne Yoder is granddaughter to the owner of the woodworking shop where Titus is working in Kentucky. I thought it was refreshing how she was unable to cook, not interested in finding a husband, and wanted more than anything to join her male family members in the family's woodshop. Suzanne grows in this book, but ultimately stays true to herself. I was really impressed by this novel and am excited to read the rest of the series.

— Samantha McMahon

The World of Book Reviews

Wanda has a way of bringing in sorrow and humor together that makes you feel at ease. One minute you feel sorry for Titus on how insecure he is and the next you are laughing when he falls in a pile of manure.


I also love the innocent humor among the characters. I was laughing out loud through quite a few pages causing stares from some people ( guess they never read a good book ). This was a fun and easy read. If you have reservations of starting a Amish read give some a try. I am glad I did.

— Barbara Hightower

Christian Book Reviews

This book for me was inspiring. I can relate to Titus, in a very realistic way. I love reading inspirational stories that offer hope for the future. Personally I could not put, The Journey, down. I wanted to read it till it was finished. I was intrigued by the story line, and captivated by the series of events. Mrs. Brustetter does a wonderful job at integrating a great deal of emotions into one book. She captures the reader’s attention, through adventure, suspense, love and faith. This book inspires others to look at the motives of their hearts. It also teaches us valuable lessons of forgiveness, family, love and redemption.

— Sharise Toombs

Dr. J's Book Place

Ms Brunstetter has written extensively about the Amish and her novels are full of color, family, personal hope, disappointment, confusion, and love. People often forget that just because their lifestyle is completely governed by their faith, they still encounter the same challenges and problems everyone must resolve. They are imperfect people as are all of us, they don't always do the wisest thing, they get upset at each other and their children have the same struggles growing up. If anything, the restrictive way of life can sometimes make growing up even more difficult, although those guidelines, while seeming to oppress, are just live very good fences which keep people and other creatures safe.

I greatly enjoyed this novel and found their ways of relating to be heart-warming and inspirational. My own family has a very strong faith base, but whether or not that is the case with readers, there are still wonderful scenes in this book to be encountered and genuine people to meet. While it is fiction, it very accurately reflects the way families and individuals resolve their questions, problems, and challenges. And like all of us, Titus learns that he has the capability to make choices that will insure a measure of happiness for him and any future family he may have.

This is really an old-fashioned love story and I hope you all will read it soon.

— Judith Hirsch-Kikejs

My Favorite Things Reading and Reviewing

This is a great book and I can't wait until the fall when the next in the series comes out "The Healing"

— Edna Tollison

Maureen's Musings

As you follow along with the story you will have some very sad, moving moments, and some really laugh out loud times. The trust in the Lord is seen in both families is very inspirational. This is a wonderful story, and I can't wait for the next book in the series.

— Maureen Timerman

CBA Retailers

Wanda E. Brunstetter integrates a montage of issues - parents dealing with rebellious children, opposition to women doing a man's job, letting go of grown children, finding self-worth, total Reliance in God - into one captivating book. Amid intrigue, drama, misunderstandings, and romance, the main characters learn valuable life lessons and mature along the way. Recommend this page-turner for fans of Amish novels and inspirational fiction.

— Nancy Kanafani

BookPage

Wanda E. Brunstetter's The Journey is the first book in the new Kentucky Brothers series. We meet Titus Fisher, who desperately needs to start a new life after having his heart broken by Phoebe Stoltzfus, the woman he'd grown up planning to marry. Titus decides to make a change, and an Amish community in Christian County, Kentucky, seems like just the right place to do it. In Christian County Titus becomes intrigued with Suzanne Yoder, who is an unusually talented woman, struggling to fit into the traditional parameters of the Amish life. But what will Titus do when Phoebe shows up unexpectedly, suddenly ready to marry him? Brunstetter smoothly leads us on a life journey with Titus and the many characters we meet in this new series. New and longtime fans of Amish fiction will be eager to continue the travels with book two, The Healing (on sale in September), and book three, The Struggle.

— Dee Ann Grand

A Book a Day

I thought The Journey was a beautiful story, and having never read another Amish fiction book set in Kentucky, it kept things very interesting. The usual setting is Pennsylvania or Ohio, so that initially made this book unique. We also saw a lot more of the man's perspective as large parts of the book were about Titus' thoughts and feelings.

I also loved the ending. I won't give it away, but I will say it leaves you wanting more, waiting for the next book, but without being upset the author cut off at such a point. Still, I will be reading the next book in the series, The Healing, (and maybe if I am lucky I can do an advance review!)

— Camille Buffenmeyer

Mrs. Scott Reads

The Journey is a wonderful story with beautifully developed characters and a detailed, complex plot. Brunstetter takes us on a journey around the US, with the story happening simultaneously in Pennsylvania, Kentucky, and California.

— Tonya Scott

Love My 2 Dogs

Once again, I was impressed with the work of Wanda Brunstetter

— Tammy Graham

Mom's Pace

I was so excited to catch up with the Fisher family from my favorite Wanda Brunstetter series, Daughters of Lancaster County. I really enjoyed how Wanda weaved that past series into this new book and how we were able to see how the family has grown. I can't believe how it ended and can't wait to read the next one in the series!

— Jodie Moore

Come Meet AusJenny

Another great book by Wanda E Brunstetter.

— Jenny Blake

The Near Sighted Bookworm

Amish fiction is one of my favorite categories of fiction. Wanda Brunstetter is a pro at this type of fiction and keeps churning out book after book that delights readers all over the world, including me. This book was a great read and it was a very easy and inspiration read.

— Janis Rodgers

Book Bargains and Previews

This book is more than a love story, but it deals with young adults coming into their own and finding their own life's path. I loved it!

— Barb M.

Five Star Reviewed Books and More

The Journey by Wanda E. Brunstetter kicks off a brand new series (called “Kentucky Brothers”) that centers on Titus Fisher as he begins a new life in Christian County, Kentucky. Leaving his past, Titus meets two different women---one a potential girlfriend and the other, a painful reminder of a lost love. I was definitely caught up in this series and can’t wait to share The Healing with you this fall!

— Susan Choy

Goodreads - Denise Schirmuhly

This story was very sweet and I just loved Titus and Pheobe. I was a little confused by some of the characters in Lancaster, it seemed that I was missing something and I now realize Wanda E. Brunstetter has many Amish stories out and it seems they are characters from previous books. It did not take away from the story, it just makes me want to pick up some of the previous novels. This was a nice, clean christian book that was a refreshing read.
Good Reads - Barbara Beers

I loved this story - the broken hearts, the family interactions, the community, the misunderstandings, the mystery, the drama, and the reliance on God. I experienced a vast array of emotions while I read - joy, frustration, fear, relief, pain - as well as laughing out loud, shedding a few tears, and lots of smiles. I would recommend this novel to anyone who would enjoy inspirational fiction, Amish fiction, or a sweet love story.

The World of Book Reviews - Barbara Hightower

Wanda has a way of bringing in sorrow and humor together that makes you feel at ease. One minute you feel sorry for Titus on how insecure he is and the next you are laughing when he falls in a pile of manure.



I also love the innocent humor among the characters. I was laughing out loud through quite a few pages causing stares from some people ( guess they never read a good book ). This was a fun and easy read. If you have reservations of starting a Amish read give some a try. I am glad I did.

Good Reads - Samantha McMahon

I enjoyed reading sort of a continuation of the Fisher family from the Daughters of Lancaster County series. I liked that this story focused on one of the twins. Suzanne Yoder is granddaughter to the owner of the woodworking shop where Titus is working in Kentucky. I thought it was refreshing how she was unable to cook, not interested in finding a husband, and wanted more than anything to join her male family members in the family's woodshop. Suzanne grows in this book, but ultimately stays true to herself. I was really impressed by this novel and am excited to read the rest of the series.
Christian Book Reviews - Sharise Toombs

This book for me was inspiring. I can relate to Titus, in a very realistic way. I love reading inspirational stories that offer hope for the future. Personally I could not put, The Journey, down. I wanted to read it till it was finished. I was intrigued by the story line, and captivated by the series of events. Mrs. Brustetter does a wonderful job at integrating a great deal of emotions into one book. She captures the reader’s attention, through adventure, suspense, love and faith. This book inspires others to look at the motives of their hearts. It also teaches us valuable lessons of forgiveness, family, love and redemption.
Dr. J's Book Place - Judith Hirsch-Kikejs

Ms Brunstetter has written extensively about the Amish and her novels are full of color, family, personal hope, disappointment, confusion, and love. People often forget that just because their lifestyle is completely governed by their faith, they still encounter the same challenges and problems everyone must resolve. They are imperfect people as are all of us, they don't always do the wisest thing, they get upset at each other and their children have the same struggles growing up. If anything, the restrictive way of life can sometimes make growing up even more difficult, although those guidelines, while seeming to oppress, are just live very good fences which keep people and other creatures safe.

I greatly enjoyed this novel and found their ways of relating to be heart-warming and inspirational. My own family has a very strong faith base, but whether or not that is the case with readers, there are still wonderful scenes in this book to be encountered and genuine people to meet. While it is fiction, it very accurately reflects the way families and individuals resolve their questions, problems, and challenges. And like all of us, Titus learns that he has the capability to make choices that will insure a measure of happiness for him and any future family he may have.

This is really an old-fashioned love story and I hope you all will read it soon.

My Favorite Things Reading and Reviewing - Edna Tollison

This is a great book and I can't wait until the fall when the next in the series comes out "The Healing"
Maureen's Musings - Maureen Timerman

As you follow along with the story you will have some very sad, moving moments, and some really laugh out loud times. The trust in the Lord is seen in both families is very inspirational. This is a wonderful story, and I can't wait for the next book in the series.
CBA Retailers - Nancy Kanafani

Wanda E. Brunstetter integrates a montage of issues - parents dealing with rebellious children, opposition to women doing a man's job, letting go of grown children, finding self-worth, total Reliance in God - into one captivating book. Amid intrigue, drama, misunderstandings, and romance, the main characters learn valuable life lessons and mature along the way. Recommend this page-turner for fans of Amish novels and inspirational fiction.
BookPage - Dee Ann Grand

Wanda E. Brunstetter's The Journey is the first book in the new Kentucky Brothers series. We meet Titus Fisher, who desperately needs to start a new life after having his heart broken by Phoebe Stoltzfus, the woman he'd grown up planning to marry. Titus decides to make a change, and an Amish community in Christian County, Kentucky, seems like just the right place to do it. In Christian County Titus becomes intrigued with Suzanne Yoder, who is an unusually talented woman, struggling to fit into the traditional parameters of the Amish life. But what will Titus do when Phoebe shows up unexpectedly, suddenly ready to marry him? Brunstetter smoothly leads us on a life journey with Titus and the many characters we meet in this new series. New and longtime fans of Amish fiction will be eager to continue the travels with book two, The Healing (on sale in September), and book three, The Struggle.
A Book a Day - Camille Buffenmeyer

I thought The Journey was a beautiful story, and having never read another Amish fiction book set in Kentucky, it kept things very interesting. The usual setting is Pennsylvania or Ohio, so that initially made this book unique. We also saw a lot more of the man's perspective as large parts of the book were about Titus' thoughts and feelings.

I also loved the ending. I won't give it away, but I will say it leaves you wanting more, waiting for the next book, but without being upset the author cut off at such a point. Still, I will be reading the next book in the series, The Healing, (and maybe if I am lucky I can do an advance review!)

Mrs. Scott Reads - Tonya Scott

The Journey is a wonderful story with beautifully developed characters and a detailed, complex plot. Brunstetter takes us on a journey around the US, with the story happening simultaneously in Pennsylvania, Kentucky, and California.

Love My 2 Dogs - Tammy Graham

Once again, I was impressed with the work of Wanda Brunstetter
Mom's Pace - Jodie Moore

I was so excited to catch up with the Fisher family from my favorite Wanda Brunstetter series, Daughters of Lancaster County. I really enjoyed how Wanda weaved that past series into this new book and how we were able to see how the family has grown. I can't believe how it ended and can't wait to read the next one in the series!

Come Meet AusJenny - Jenny Blake

Another great book by Wanda E Brunstetter.
The Near Sighted Bookworm - Janis Rodgers

Amish fiction is one of my favorite categories of fiction. Wanda Brunstetter is a pro at this type of fiction and keeps churning out book after book that delights readers all over the world, including me. This book was a great read and it was a very easy and inspiration read.

Book Bargains and Previews - Barb M.

This book is more than a love story, but it deals with young adults coming into their own and finding their own life's path. I loved it!
Five Star Reviewed Books and More - Susan Choy

The Journey by Wanda E. Brunstetter kicks off a brand new series (called “Kentucky Brothers”) that centers on Titus Fisher as he begins a new life in Christian County, Kentucky. Leaving his past, Titus meets two different women---one a potential girlfriend and the other, a painful reminder of a lost love. I was definitely caught up in this series and can’t wait to share The Healing with you this fall!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781594153778
Publisher:
Gale Group
Publication date:
04/01/2011
Series:
Kentucky Brothers Series , #1
Edition description:
Large Print
Pages:
586
Sales rank:
897,993
Product dimensions:
5.60(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.20(d)

Read an Excerpt

The Journey


By Wanda E. Brunstetter

Barbour Publishing, Inc.

Copyright © 2011 Wanda E. Brunstetter
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-60742-255-6


CHAPTER 1

Paradise, Pennsylvania


Titus Fisher liked horses, dogs, and shoofly pie. What he didn't like was a cat that scratched, and a woman he couldn't trust. Today he'd dealt with both.

Gritting his teeth, he grabbed his horse's bridle and led him into the barn, wishing he hadn't gotten out of bed that morning. The day had started on a sour note when Titus had come to the barn to feed the horses and accidentally stepped on one of Mom's cats. Five of the irksome critters lived in the barn, and every one of them liked to bite and scratch. Whiskers, the smallest of the five, was the most aggressive. The crazy cat had been so miffed when Titus stepped on her tail that she'd clawed her way right up his leg, hissing and yowling as she went. When Titus had tried to push Whiskers off, she'd let him have it—leaving a nasty scratch on his leg.

Titus pulled up his pant leg and stared at the wound, still red and swollen. It reminded him of the time when he and his twin brother, Timothy, were six years old and had found a wild cat in the woodpile behind their barn. The mangy critter had bitten Titus's hand, and when the bite became infected, he'd started running a fever. Mom had taken him to the doctor's, where he'd been given a tetanus shot and an antibiotic. Ever since then, he'd had an aversion to cats.

"In my opinion, except for catching mice, cats are pretty much worthless," Titus mumbled as he guided his horse into one of the stalls. When he patted the horse's ebony-colored flanks, the gelding whinnied and flipped his head around to nuzzle Titus's hand. "Not like you, Lightning. You're worth every dollar I paid for you. You're dependable and trustworthy." He grimaced. "Wish I could say the same for Phoebe Stoltzfus."

Titus poured some oats into a bucket, and as his horse ate, he replayed the conversation he'd had with Phoebe on his way home from work that afternoon....

"I'm not ready to join the church yet, and I'm too young to get married." Phoebe flipped the strings of her head covering over her shoulders and blinked her blue eyes. "Why do you have to put so much pressure on me, Titus?"

"I-I'm not," he stammered, "but I've been waiting a long time for you, and I'd thought that when I joined the church two years ago, you'd join, too."

"I wasn't ready then. I was only sixteen and had other things on my mind."

"How well I know that. You were too busy runnin' around with your friends and tryin' out all sorts of worldly things." Titus groaned. "Figured you'd have all that out of your system by now and would be ready to settle down."

She shook her head. "Maybe in a few years I'll be ready."

"You said that two years ago."

"Things have changed." She placed her hand gently on his arm. "My friend Darlene Mast is planning a trip to Los Angeles, and she's leaving in a few days, so—"

He held up his hand. "Please don't tell me you want to go with her."

"I think it would be fun, and I've always wanted to see the Pacific Ocean." She looked up at him and smiled. "You're full of adventure and like to try new things. Wouldn't you like to see California?"

He shrugged. "Maybe someday, but not right now. What I want is for you to join the church this fall so we can get married."

She shook her head. "I just told you—I'm not ready for that."

"Will you ever be ready?"

"I don't know." She pushed a wisp of soft, auburn hair under her white organdy head covering and turned her gaze away from him. "I—I might not join the church. I might decide to go English."

"Are you kidding?"

"No, I'm not. I don't know if I want to be Amish."

Titus's jaw tightened as the reality of the situation set in. If Phoebe went to California, she might never come back. If she didn't join the church, they couldn't get married. Titus had been in love with Phoebe since he was seventeen years old, but she'd been four years younger than him, and their parents had disapproved. He'd waited patiently until Phoebe turned sixteen. Even then, his folks had been opposed to him courting her because she seemed so unsettled and ran with a wild bunch of kids.

Now Titus, at the age of twenty-two, still wasn't sure he and Phoebe would ever get married. If she did go English, the only way they could marry would be if he broke his vow to the Amish church, which he did not want to do.

"Can we talk about this later?" he asked. "After you've had a chance to think about this some more?"

"There's nothing to think about. I'm going to California." She tipped her head and stared up at him. "If you don't want to come, then I guess it's over between us."

"You can't do this, Phoebe. Are you just going to give up on us like this?"

She shrugged.

"Don't you love me anymore?"

"I—I'm not sure. Maybe we're not meant to be together."

Titus flinched. He felt like he'd been kicked in the stomach by one of his dad's stubborn mules. He had a sinking feeling that once Phoebe left home she'd never come back. All his years of waiting for her had been for nothing.


Titus's horse whinnied and nudged his hand, pulling his thoughts back to the present.

"Stop it, Lightning. I'm not in the mood." Titus kicked at a bale of straw and winced when Lightning whipped his head around and bumped his sore leg.

Lightning whinnied again and stomped his hoof. Then he moved to the other end of his stall and turned his backside toward Titus.

"It's all right, boy. I'm not mad at you." Titus stepped up to the horse and reached out his hand. "I'm upset with Phoebe, that's all."

As though accepting his apology, Lightning nuzzled Titus's neck.

Horses and dogs—that's about all that ever held my interest until Phoebe came along, Titus thought. If there was only some way to get her out of my system. If I could just tell myself that I don't care anymore.

* * *

Pembroke, Kentucky

As Suzanne Yoder stared out the living room window, a sense of discontentment welled in her soul. She enjoyed living in Christian County, especially in the spring when the flowers and trees began to bloom.

I wish I could be outside right now, tilling the garden or even mowing the lawn, she thought with regret. It was too nice to be stuck indoors, yet she knew she needed to work on the quilt she'd started several months ago for her friend Esther Beiler's twenty-fourth birthday, which was less than a month away.

Suzanne's gaze shifted from the garden to the woodshop, where her grandfather and twenty-year-old brother, Nelson, worked. Due to painful arthritis, Grandpa's fingers didn't work well anymore, so he'd recently decided to look for someone else to help Nelson in the shop. Someone younger and more able-bodied. Someone who knew the woodworking trade.

Grandpa wasn't one to sit around or take life easy while others did all the work, but Mom had convinced him that he could still have a hand in the business by ordering supplies, waiting on customers, and keeping the books. Grandpa wasn't happy about it, but at least he wouldn't be sitting on the porch in his rocking chair all day, wishing he could be in the shop.

"I thought you were supposed to be working on Esther's birthday present," Mom said when she joined Suzanne in the living room.

"I was, but my eyes needed a break. I was thinking about going out to the woodshop to see if there's anything I can do to help out."

Mom's dark eyebrows furrowed as she slowly shook her head. "You'll never get that quilt done if you keep procrastinating, and there's no need for you to run out to the woodshop, because I'm sure you and Nelson would only end up in a disagreement. You know how he feels about you hanging around the shop."

Suzanne frowned. No one in the family understood her desire to be in the woodshop, where she could enjoy the distinctive odors of wood being cut, sanded, or stained. It was a shame nobody took her interest in woodworking seriously. Not long ago, Suzanne had borrowed some of Grandpa's tools so she could make a few birdhouses and feeders to put in their yard. She'd never gotten any encouragement in making them, though. She guessed compared to the cabinets, doors, and storage sheds Grandpa and Nelson made, the birdhouses and feeders were insignificant.

Mom touched Suzanne's shoulder. "I'm going to plant some peas and lettuce this afternoon, so if you think you've worked long enough on the quilt today, I could use your help."

Suzanne didn't have to be asked twice. Any chore she could do outdoors would be better than being inside, where it was warm and stuffy. "I'll meet you outside as soon as I put away my quilting supplies," she said.

"That'll be fine." Mom gave Suzanne's arm a light tap and disappeared into the kitchen.

Suzanne glanced out the window once more and sighed as her gaze came to rest on the woodshop. "Guess I won't make it out there today—except to take the men their lunch."

* * *

Paradise, Pennsylvania

Titus left the barn and was about to head for the house, when a dark blue pickup rumbled up the driveway. He didn't recognize the vehicle or the young English man with dark curly hair who opened the cab door and stepped out.

"Is this where Zach Fisher lives?" the man asked as he approached Titus.

"Sort of. My dad owns this place, and Zach and his family live in the house behind ours." Titus pointed in that direction.

"Oh, I see. Is Zach at home?"

"Nope, not yet. He's up in Blue Ball, painting the outside of the bowling alley. Probably won't be home till sometime after six."

The man extended his hand. "I'm Allen Walters. I knew Zach when he lived in Puyallup, Washington."

"That was when he thought his name was Jimmy Scott, huh?"

"That's right."

"Zach's my half brother. My twin brother, Timothy, and I were born during the time Zach was missing. He was about six or seven then, I think."

"My mother and the woman Zach thought was his mother became good friends, so Zach and I kind of grew up together."

"Zach's mentioned that," Titus said. "Sure is somethin' the way he was kidnapped when he was a baby and never located his real family until he was twenty-one."

"I really missed Zach after he left Washington, but I'm glad he found his way home." Allen folded his arms and leaned against the side of his truck. "The last time I saw Zach was before he got married, and that was seven years ago. We've kept in touch through letters and phone calls, though."

"Did Zach know you were coming?"

Allen shook his head. "He doesn't know I've moved from Washington State to Kentucky either."

"You're welcome to hang around here until he gets home, because I'm sure he'll be pleased to see you."

"Thanks, I'll do that."

Just then, Titus's mother stepped out of the house and started across the yard toward them, her slightly plump figure shuffling through the grass.

"This is my mother, Fannie Fisher." Titus motioned to Allen. "Mom, this is Zach's old friend, Allen Walters. He used to live in Washington."

Mom's brown eyes brightened as she shook Allen's hand. "It's nice to finally meet you. Zach's told us a lot about you and your family."

"He's talked to me about his family here, too."

"I explained to Allen that Zach's still at work and said he's welcome to stay here until Zach gets home."

Mom bobbed her head. "Why don't you stay for supper? I'll invite Zach and his family to join us. I think it would be nice for you to meet his wife and children."

"I'd like that," Allen said with an enthusiastic nod.

"If you need a place to spend the night, you're more than welcome to stay here." Mom smiled. "Since Titus is our only son still living at home, we have more than enough room to accommodate guests."

"I appreciate the offer, but I've already reserved a room at a hotel in Bird-in-Hand."

"That's fine, but the offer's open if you change your mind." Mom turned toward the house. "I'd better go back inside and get supper going."

As Mom headed to the house, Titus motioned to a couple of wooden chairs sitting beneath the maple tree on their lawn. "Why don't we take a seat?" he said to Allen. "I'm real interested in hearing why you moved to Kentucky.

CHAPTER 2

Pembroke, Kentucky


Everything sure looks good," Grandpa said as he seated himself in his chair at the head of the table. "Did you make any part of the meal tonight?" he asked, raising his bushy gray eyebrows as he looked at Suzanne.

"She cut up the cabbage and tomatoes for the coleslaw," Mom said before Suzanne could reply.

"What about the hinkel? Who fixed that?" Suzanne's nine-year-old brother, Chad, wearing an expectant expression, pointed to the platter of crispy fried chicken.

"I made the chicken," Mom said.

Chad pushed a hunk of flaming red hair out of his eyes and smacked his lips noisily. "That's gut to know, 'cause the last time Suzanne tried to bake a chicken, it came out of the oven chewy like rubber."

"That's because the chicken was old and tough," Suzanne said in her own defense.

The skin around Chad's blue eyes creased as his freckled nose wrinkled. "Wouldn't matter how old the bird was, 'cause you'da done somethin' wrong to it." He touched his jaw. "My mouth was sore the rest of the night after chewin' on that horrible chicken."

Grandpa's pale blue eyes narrowed as he shot the boy a warning look. "That'll be enough. Let's pray so we can eat."

All heads bowed. Suzanne's silent prayer was short and to the point. Heavenly Father, thank You for this food, and help my family to see that I have other skills that don't involve cooking. Amen.

Suzanne heard Grandpa rustle his silverware, so she opened her eyes. Everyone else did the same.

"Would ya please pass the macaroni salad?" Suzanne's six-year-old sister, Effie, asked. She had the same red hair and blue eyes as Nelson and Chad, which they'd inherited from their father, who'd died in a farming accident two years ago. Suzanne's hair was more subdued, a combination of her mother's brown hair and her father's red hair.

Suzanne handed Effie the bowl of Mom's zesty macaroni salad, and then she turned to Grandpa and said, "Have you found anyone to work in the woodshop yet?"

He frowned as he shook his nearly bald head. "We'd thought about training Russell, but your uncle Dan needs the boy's help at his dairy, so we've decided to look for someone who already has some woodworking experience."

"There's no need for that," Suzanne was quick to say. "You can hire me."

Her brother Nelson's pale eyebrows lifted high on his forehead. "You're kidding, right?"

"No, I'm not."

"You're not experienced," he said with a shake of his head.

"I've made a few birdhouses and feeders."

"Those are small and don't begin to compare with the finely crafted cabinets, doors, and storage sheds we make in our shop." Nelson motioned to the window facing their yard. "Besides, you've got plenty to do taking care of the vegetables and flowers we grow in our garden and helping Mom in the house."

"But gardening is seasonal, and when I'm in the house for too long, I get bored." Suzanne picked up her napkin and wiped the juice from the chicken on her fingers.

"You wouldn't be bored if you spent more time in the kitchen," Nelson said. "How are you gonna find a husband if you don't learn to cook?"

Suzanne glared at him. "Why does everyone think a woman must marry? I personally don't care if I ever marry."

"You weren't sayin' that last year when you were hopin' James Beiler would start courtin' you," Suzanne's sixteen-year-old brother, Russell, chimed in. He was the only child in the Yoder family who had Mom's brown hair and brown eyes.

Suzanne clenched her fork so tightly that her fingers turned numb. She didn't need the reminder that she'd previously had a crush on Esther's older brother. For a while, it had seemed like James might be interested in her, too, but then he'd started courting Mary Jane Smucker. Last fall they'd gotten married and moved to Lykens, Pennsylvania.

From across the table, Russell squinted his coffee-colored eyes at Suzanne. "I'll bet the reason James dropped you for Mary Jane is 'cause she's such a good cook. About the only thing you can make is soup and sandwiches, and nobody wants that for supper every night."

"That'll be enough," Mom admonished. "Just eat your supper, and leave Suzanne alone."

Chad reached for a drumstick and plopped it on his plate. "Sure am glad Mom knows how to cook."


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The Journey by Wanda E. Brunstetter. Copyright © 2011 Wanda E. Brunstetter. Excerpted by permission of Barbour Publishing, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author


New York Times bestselling and award-winning author, Wanda E. Brunstetter is one of the founders of the Amish fiction genre. She has written close to 90 books translated in four languages.  With over 10 million copies sold, Wanda's stories consistently earn spots on the nations most prestigious bestseller lists and have received numerous awards.

Wanda’s ancestors were part of the Anabaptist faith, and her novels are based on personal research intended to accurately portray the Amish way of life. Her books are well-read and trusted by many Amish, who credit her for giving readers a deeper understanding of the people and their customs.

When Wanda visits her Amish friends, she finds herself drawn to their peaceful lifestyle, sincerity, and close family ties. Wanda enjoys photography, ventriloquism, gardening, bird-watching, beachcombing, and spending time with her family. She and her husband, Richard, have been blessed with two grown children, six grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

To learn more about Wanda, visit her website at www.wandabrunstetter.com. 

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The Journey (Kentucky Brothers Series #1) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 45 reviews.
destinationamish More than 1 year ago
Titus Fisher lacks confidence and feels as though he has lived in his twin brother Timothy¿s shadow. His girlfriend Phoebe, whom he has been waiting years for to settle down, decides to break up with him and move to California. Titus is devastated and heartbroken. He seizes an opportunity that comes his way and moves to Kentucky, hoping to start a new life. He takes a job working in a wood shop where he meets the owner¿s granddaughter Suzanne Yoder. Suzanne bears an uncanny resemblance to Phoebe, which catches Titus off guard. Suzanne is dealing with her own issues. She wants to work in the wood shop, but her family believes a women¿s place is in the kitchen. She would much rather be doing anything outdoors instead of learning to cook. Titus and Suzanne¿s relationship is at best strained. She thinks he hates her and he can¿t seem to keep his emotions under control when he looks at her and sees Phoebe. Each is on a journey of sorts trying to figure themselves out. Can Titus mend his heart in time to open it up to a new beginning? You will just have to read this book and find out! You will not be disappointed. It is the first book in a series of three. Happy reading!
SallyF44 More than 1 year ago
I have read just about all Wanda Brunstetter book. What a great read about how this young Amish boy/man grew up by leaving the only home that he knew. It makes you feel as you know how the Amish live. Can't wait for second Kentucky Brothers Series to come out.
NKBookReviewer 27 days ago
The Journey is book one in author Wanda Brunstetter’s series Kentucky Brothers. It is a 386 page paperback book. This is a spin-off of her Daughters of Lancaster County series. Some of the characters and things discussed will be familiar if you have read that series. If you haven't, you can still read this book without any problems. This is the tale of Titus Fisher, a 22 year-old Amish man who still lives with his parents in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Timothy is his twin brother. Titus is broken hearted when girlfriend, Phoebe, decides to live among the Englisch and move to California. An opportunity is presented to him to move to the Amish community in Kentucky and he takes it. A change of scenery might help his broken heart. In Kentucky Titus meets Suzanne. She looks almost identical to Phoebe, the girl he came to Kentucky to forget. Most Amish women her age are already married and know how to clean, cook, sew, and yard care of a house. Not Suzanne. At twenty two she would rather be outside than inside doing woman's work. She lives at home, has never had a boyfriend, and has settled into being single. I enjoyed this emotionally charged story. It is one of my favorites that author Brunstetter has written. The characters are well defined and likable. They hurt and rejoice like everyone does. It doesn't take long to get invested in this book. There is humor, romance, hope, heartache, redemption, encouragement, and inspiration. It discusses friend and family relations, and it broaches the subject of not fitting in the normal mold. The author has a way of transporting me to the Amish Community for a few days. The characters become friends and I want to learn what is going on in their lives. I love her use of Pennsylvania Dutch mixed into the dialogue. She has a pleasant writing style. I would highly recommend this book. It gets a 5 star rating from me.
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I enjoy Wanda's novels. This is 1st bk in Kentucky Brothers series & it didn't disapoint! She is 1 of a handful of authors that I won't start reading until I have the complete series. You can buy this as a 3 in 1 bundle. However, I recomend not doing that. While it is.cheaper you do lose some of content in each bk.
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Quick enjoyable read! Not real intense but cute!
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