Journeyman: The Many Triumphs (and Even More Defeats) Of A Guy Who's Seen
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Journeyman: The Many Triumphs (and Even More Defeats) Of A Guy Who's Seen

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by Sean Pronger
     
 

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Every young hockey player dreams of one day playing in the NHL, of skating on a line with his hero and drinking champagne in the dressing room after winning the Stanley Cup. But kids should watch what they wish for. They may make it to the pros, like Sean Pronger, only to end up playing for sixteen teams over eleven seasons. They may end up on a team with a guy like

Overview

Every young hockey player dreams of one day playing in the NHL, of skating on a line with his hero and drinking champagne in the dressing room after winning the Stanley Cup. But kids should watch what they wish for. They may make it to the pros, like Sean Pronger, only to end up playing for sixteen teams over eleven seasons. They may end up on a team with a guy like the Great One, but skate on his line only in practice when the bona fide first-line centre has the flu. And they may end up drinking champagne only because their little brother wins the Stanley Cup. Anyone who's gotten to the NHL the hard way has a story to tell. No one knows the game better than the guys on the fourth line who fight for their jobs every night. They know all too well what it's like to watch from the press box or, worse, to be sent to the minors or traded. Sean Pronger has seen it all. He's played for legendary coaches like Pat Burns and gone head-to-head with guys such as Doug Gilmour and Steve Yzerman in the faceoff circle. He was on the ice for perhaps the most notorious violent attack in recent hockey history. While playing in the minors in Winnipeg, he guzzled beer in an ice-fishing hut with grizzled veterans like John MacLean, and while playing in Europe, he caused international incidents with guys such as Doug Weight. Full of hilarious stories and self-deprecating jokes, Journeyman is a story not only about achieving a dream, but about realizing you've achieved it.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780143186731
Publisher:
Penguin Canada
Publication date:
11/06/2012
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
320
File size:
3 MB

Meet the Author

SEAN PRONGER was a professional hockey player who grew up in Dryden, Ontario, and was drafted fifty-first overall by Vancouver in 1991. From 1995 to 2004, he played in the NHL for the Anaheim Mighty Ducks, the Pittsburgh Penguins, the New York Rangers, the Los Angeles Kings, the Boston Bruins, the Columbus Blue Jackets, and the Vancouver Canucks. He played in 260 regular-season games, earning 23 goals and 36 assists for 59 points, picking up 159 penalty minutes. His brother is NHL defenceman Chris Pronger.

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Journeyman 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Most hockey and other sports books are fluff pieces which rarely get into the soul of the game or the reality of pro sports. Journeyman is a great read because Sean is both honest and funny. If there is a fault, it is that Sean was a very good player who went further and achieved more than lots of others with much more talent and ability. He is a credit to the Finish term sisu.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The only problem I have with this book is that Sean was a much better hockey player than he'd care to admit. It was a great read though, fascinating perspective of a grinder that you never get to hear about. There are a lot of fun stories  and war stories
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I went into this book a bit skeptical but was pleasently surprized. It is a perspective of the game we as fans never think abiut. Outside of a couple under handed cheap shots at the new york islanders i say this is a five star read. More interesting and far better written than Roenicks new book.