Journeys: The Teaching of Writing in the Elementary Classrooms / Edition 1

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Overview

As any writing teacher will tell you, writing is about the journey, not the destination. This practical new book takes that idea to heart and presents a map for the trip based on the five elements of the Writer's Workshop: mini-lessons, reading, composing, sharing, and continuous assessment. Two-part chapters first address the type of writing being considered—poetry, story, expository, journal, personal, or persuasive—in light of the five workshop elements; then, provide vignettes from three elementary classrooms that show the workshop elements being effectively implemented. Along the way, student artifacts from grades 1, 3, and 5—and the insights of three teachers from these grades—bolster the book's narrative. For elementary school English teachers.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130221445
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 10/7/2002
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 418
  • Product dimensions: 8.18 (w) x 10.70 (h) x 1.18 (d)

Meet the Author

Carolyn L. Piazza is an associate professor of reading and language arts and elementary education at Florida State University, where she teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in language arts, written composition, and applied linguistics. She also spends each semester supervising student teachers and working with classroom teachers in the public schools. Dr. Piazza is the author of several professional works on language and composition and, for a time, wrote a weekly literacy column, Ask Carolyn, in the local newspaper. Her most recent book, Multiple Forms of Literacy: Teaching Literacy and the Arts, brings together her passion for language with the visual and performing arts. She enjoys gardening, studying Italian, and, above all, her two Yorkies.

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Read an Excerpt

"I should see the garden far better," said Alice to herself, "if I could get to the top of that hill: and here's a path that leads straight to it—at least, no it doesn't do that." After going a few yards along the path, and turning several sharp corners—"but I suppose it will at last. But how curious it twists! It's more like a corkscrew than a path!"
Through the Looking Glass (Carroll, 1872)

Teaching writing is filled with twists and turns; it is more like a corkscrew than a straight path. Seldom does it move from point A to point B without a hitch. New demands are always popping up unexpectedly, while familiar paths are often riddled with unmarked passages. Nothing about teaching writing is tension free or foolproof. It is a lifelong journey that takes persistence, commitment, and a desire to improve.

Teachers who embark on this journey will find that, although teaching writing is a lofty goal, never before in our history has so much been written about it. Countless studies building on the pioneering research of the 1970s—and now only a keystroke away—offer plenty of advice to guide instructional practice. The challenge, however, is making sense of this voluminous body of research and presenting it in a way that is conceptually sound and practical. Journeys: The Teaching of Writing in Elementary Classrooms provides such a conceptual framework for planning, implementing, and evaluating instruction and for presenting the strategies and skills necessary for achieving various kinds of writing. This framework is intended not only to create essential links between research and practice but also to place all writing advice and instruction within a meaningful context that considers student needs and development, types of writing tasks, curricular goals, and ongoing assessment. Accordingly, you will not find separate chapters on grammar or assessment, prewriting or reading, spelling or the writing process. Instead, strategies and skills of the craft are integrated in ways that reflect natural connections, grounded in context, and presented when most needed or appropriate.

In addition to the book's conceptual framework and set of practices, the examples and details of its application should inspire a love and passion for writing and what it can do. The journey metaphor drives this point home. The fact that writing is not simply about the destination but about the quality of the journey is something every teacher understands. Teachers want their students to enjoy writing, to see it as an adventure filled with fascination and endless discoveries. In times of accountability and widespread testing, it is all too easy to lose sight of this. As a gentle reminder about the playfulness of language and the joys and rewards of writing, quotes from Through the Looking Glass (1872) open each chapter. Lewis Carroll, its creator, is a genius at showing how curiosity and imagination can provide splendid adventures for children.

Another important message of the journey is its emphasis on growth and change. Like the journey motifs in children's literature, where the main character goes off on an adventure and returns changed in some way, students are transported beyond the written word to new understandings of self and the world. They perceive and look at things with increased sensitivity and sensibilities; confront writing problems and gain, new confidence; and learn patience, commitment, and discipline. These destinations are important to life work and should not be overlooked on this journey.

KEY TEXT FEATURES

This text is designed for novice as well as veteran teachers responsible for teaching writing in varied contexts and content areas in language arts, across the curriculum, and in cyberspace. It is appropriate for an undergraduate or graduate class and can be used as a stand-alone text or as one of a collection. Key text features guide readers through the book's discussions and practical applications. These include the following:

  • Assessment tools. To consider for student self-evaluation and for teacher observation, evaluation, and instruction
  • Classroom vignettes. To demonstrate classroom application of the writer's workshop across various types of writing and settings
  • Instructional methods. To guide minilessons and offer multiple approaches to writing instruction
  • Student work samples. To offer glimpses of children's development and responses to tasks
  • Children's literature. To accentuate the reading-writing connection and provide suggested books to accompany writing lessons
  • Multiple forms of literacy. To infuse drama, movement, music, and the visual arts into writing instruction
  • Journey reflections. To summarize and highlight major points covered in the chapter
A ROAD MAP FOR READERS

The chapters comprising this book are straightforward. Each chapter presents a particular form of writing with classroom examples to illustrate its implementation, and journey reflections that summarize both. An outline precedes each chapter and an end-of-book glossary serves as a prereading and summary resource for learning from the text.

Chapter 1 provides an overview of the book. It introduces the writer's workshop, a conceptual framework that includes five interrelated components—minilessons, reading, composing, sharing, and continuous assessment—and describes three classrooms in which the workshop is implemented.

Chapters 2 through 7 are each divided into two parts. The first part includes a discussion of the five workshop components:

  • Minilessons. Identifies two to four lesson topics that capture the striking features of the particular kind of writing under discussion.
  • Reading. Highlights the importance of reading from a writer's perspective: as a print and language model, a content source, and a vehicle for writing activity.
  • Composing. Includes strategies for the writing process: prewriting drafting, revising, and editing.
  • Sharing. Provides advice for setting up literacy forums to celebrate writing and offer feedback; considers publication of a final product and its presentation.
  • Continuous Assessment. Offers assessment, tools, such as rubrics, checklists, surveys, portfolios, and inventories, as they relate to the writer, the process, the text, and the context.

These five components anchor each chapter but address content in different ways. While the workshop components remain the same, the content, strategies, resources, teaching methods, and assessments shift and change according to the function of writing and students' needs and interests. Although these components are presented separately, in actuality, they are interrelated and should be taught as such. Moreover, the information presented in each component should be considered suggestive, not comprehensive or prescriptive.

In the second part of each chapter, vignettes are presented of three elementary classrooms in which the writer's workshop components are effectively applied in various genres of writing. For example, in the story chapter, students write animal fantasy, pourquoi tales, and science fiction. In the personal writing chapter, they compose autobiographies, letters, and personal narratives. Sample lessons and student work products grounded in the writing process are illustrative of various kinds of writing. Appearing in the table below are class rosters of students whose work will appear throughout the text. You may wish to refer to this table as you read the classroom lessons. Although each lesson is presented by grade level, most are adaptable to almost any age. Try to think outside the box and imagine how you might modify and use the lessons in your classroom.

As you journey throughout the chapters you will meet three classroom teachers who will guide you along the way. These teachers, although diverse in appearance, personality, and instructional style, are equally committed to their students and their own professional growth.

  • In the first grade is Vivian Hernandez, a vivacious woman with a ready smile and strong commitment to children. She is a creative and dedicated professional who has been teaching for 18 years.
  • The third-grade teacher is Kate Richardson, a petite, soft-spoken woman with a gentle demeanor, who, after 20 years of teaching, still exudes the same enthusiasm and passion for teaching as when she first began.
  • In the fifth grade is Ed Spinelli, admired by faculty and students alike and twice named teacher of the year. Ed, who is also a graduate student in administration and a father of three, has a self-critical openness toward young people and brings a sense of humor and vitality to the classroom.

Practically speaking, students are the travelers on this writing journey, but they are also guides. The children named on the class roster on the previous page represent a range of different writers. Because the boys and girls are from three different grade levels, their writing artifacts exhibit various skills, abilities, maturity levels, learning styles, interests, and cultures. Their writing samples provide you with an opportunity to observe writing experiences in typical elementary classrooms. You can use these examples to help develop a sense of children's skills and learning needs with regards to writing. Throughout the book, teachers and students are referred to by their first names. In cases where participants remain anonymous, pronouns he and she will be alternated by chapter to avoid the awkwardness of gendered language.

Although there is much to be learned from a text focusing on practical application, ultimately you will have to adapt the information and map out a plan for following your own steady and unwavering course. Think of yourself as one of the travelers, and as the adventure unfolds, imagine the possibilities for your own classroom.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1. The Writer's Workshop.

2. Journal Writing.

3. Personal Writing.

4. Story Writing.

5. Poetry Writing.

6. Expository Writing.

7. Persuasive Writing.

Glossary.

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Preface

"I should see the garden far better," said Alice to herself, "if I could get to the
top of that hill: and here's a path that leads straight to it—at least, no it
doesn't do that." After going a few yards along the path, and turning several
sharp corners—"but I suppose it will at last. But how curious it twists! It's
more like a corkscrew than a path!"

Through the Looking Glass (Carroll, 1872)

Teaching writing is filled with twists and turns; it is more like a corkscrew than a straight path. Seldom does it move from point A to point B without a hitch. New demands are always popping up unexpectedly, while familiar paths are often riddled with unmarked passages. Nothing about teaching writing is tension free or foolproof. It is a lifelong journey that takes persistence, commitment, and a desire to improve.

Teachers who embark on this journey will find that, although teaching writing is a lofty goal, never before in our history has so much been written about it. Countless studies building on the pioneering research of the 1970s—and now only a keystroke away—offer plenty of advice to guide instructional practice. The challenge, however, is making sense of this voluminous body of research and presenting it in a way that is conceptually sound and practical. Journeys: The Teaching of Writing in Elementary Classrooms provides such a conceptual framework for planning, implementing, and evaluating instruction and for presenting the strategies and skills necessary for achieving various kinds of writing. This framework is intended not only to create essential links between research and practice but also to place all writing advice and instruction within a meaningful context that considers student needs and development, types of writing tasks, curricular goals, and ongoing assessment. Accordingly, you will not find separate chapters on grammar or assessment, prewriting or reading, spelling or the writing process. Instead, strategies and skills of the craft are integrated in ways that reflect natural connections, grounded in context, and presented when most needed or appropriate.

In addition to the book's conceptual framework and set of practices, the examples and details of its application should inspire a love and passion for writing and what it can do. The journey metaphor drives this point home. The fact that writing is not simply about the destination but about the quality of the journey is something every teacher understands. Teachers want their students to enjoy writing, to see it as an adventure filled with fascination and endless discoveries. In times of accountability and widespread testing, it is all too easy to lose sight of this. As a gentle reminder about the playfulness of language and the joys and rewards of writing, quotes from Through the Looking Glass (1872) open each chapter. Lewis Carroll, its creator, is a genius at showing how curiosity and imagination can provide splendid adventures for children.

Another important message of the journey is its emphasis on growth and change. Like the journey motifs in children's literature, where the main character goes off on an adventure and returns changed in some way, students are transported beyond the written word to new understandings of self and the world. They perceive and look at things with increased sensitivity and sensibilities; confront writing problems and gain, new confidence; and learn patience, commitment, and discipline. These destinations are important to life work and should not be overlooked on this journey.

KEY TEXT FEATURES

This text is designed for novice as well as veteran teachers responsible for teaching writing in varied contexts and content areas in language arts, across the curriculum, and in cyberspace. It is appropriate for an undergraduate or graduate class and can be used as a stand-alone text or as one of a collection. Key text features guide readers through the book's discussions and practical applications. These include the following:

  • Assessment tools. To consider for student self-evaluation and for teacher observation, evaluation, and instruction
  • Classroom vignettes. To demonstrate classroom application of the writer's workshop across various types of writing and settings
  • Instructional methods. To guide minilessons and offer multiple approaches to writing instruction
  • Student work samples. To offer glimpses of children's development and responses to tasks
  • Children's literature. To accentuate the reading-writing connection and provide suggested books to accompany writing lessons
  • Multiple forms of literacy. To infuse drama, movement, music, and the visual arts into writing instruction
  • Journey reflections. To summarize and highlight major points covered in the chapter

A ROAD MAP FOR READERS

The chapters comprising this book are straightforward. Each chapter presents a particular form of writing with classroom examples to illustrate its implementation, and journey reflections that summarize both. An outline precedes each chapter and an end-of-book glossary serves as a prereading and summary resource for learning from the text.

Chapter 1 provides an overview of the book. It introduces the writer's workshop, a conceptual framework that includes five interrelated components—minilessons, reading, composing, sharing, and continuous assessment—and describes three classrooms in which the workshop is implemented.

Chapters 2 through 7 are each divided into two parts. The first part includes a discussion of the five workshop components:

  • Minilessons. Identifies two to four lesson topics that capture the striking features of the particular kind of writing under discussion.
  • Reading. Highlights the importance of reading from a writer's perspective: as a print and language model, a content source, and a vehicle for writing activity.
  • Composing. Includes strategies for the writing process: prewriting drafting, revising, and editing.
  • Sharing. Provides advice for setting up literacy forums to celebrate writing and offer feedback; considers publication of a final product and its presentation.
  • Continuous Assessment. Offers assessment, tools, such as rubrics, checklists, surveys, portfolios, and inventories, as they relate to the writer, the process, the text, and the context.

These five components anchor each chapter but address content in different ways. While the workshop components remain the same, the content, strategies, resources, teaching methods, and assessments shift and change according to the function of writing and students' needs and interests. Although these components are presented separately, in actuality, they are interrelated and should be taught as such. Moreover, the information presented in each component should be considered suggestive, not comprehensive or prescriptive.

In the second part of each chapter, vignettes are presented of three elementary classrooms in which the writer's workshop components are effectively applied in various genres of writing. For example, in the story chapter, students write animal fantasy, pourquoi tales, and science fiction. In the personal writing chapter, they compose autobiographies, letters, and personal narratives. Sample lessons and student work products grounded in the writing process are illustrative of various kinds of writing. Appearing in the table below are class rosters of students whose work will appear throughout the text. You may wish to refer to this table as you read the classroom lessons. Although each lesson is presented by grade level, most are adaptable to almost any age. Try to think outside the box and imagine how you might modify and use the lessons in your classroom.

As you journey throughout the chapters you will meet three classroom teachers who will guide you along the way. These teachers, although diverse in appearance, personality, and instructional style, are equally committed to their students and their own professional growth.

  • In the first grade is Vivian Hernandez, a vivacious woman with a ready smile and strong commitment to children. She is a creative and dedicated professional who has been teaching for 18 years.
  • The third-grade teacher is Kate Richardson, a petite, soft-spoken woman with a gentle demeanor, who, after 20 years of teaching, still exudes the same enthusiasm and passion for teaching as when she first began.
  • In the fifth grade is Ed Spinelli, admired by faculty and students alike and twice named teacher of the year. Ed, who is also a graduate student in administration and a father of three, has a self-critical openness toward young people and brings a sense of humor and vitality to the classroom.

Practically speaking, students are the travelers on this writing journey, but they are also guides. The children named on the class roster on the previous page represent a range of different writers. Because the boys and girls are from three different grade levels, their writing artifacts exhibit various skills, abilities, maturity levels, learning styles, interests, and cultures. Their writing samples provide you with an opportunity to observe writing experiences in typical elementary classrooms. You can use these examples to help develop a sense of children's skills and learning needs with regards to writing. Throughout the book, teachers and students are referred to by their first names. In cases where participants remain anonymous, pronouns he and she will be alternated by chapter to avoid the awkwardness of gendered language.

Although there is much to be learned from a text focusing on practical application, ultimately you will have to adapt the information and map out a plan for following your own steady and unwavering course. Think of yourself as one of the travelers, and as the adventure unfolds, imagine the possibilities for your own classroom.

Read More Show Less

Introduction

"I should see the garden far better," said Alice to herself, "if I could get to the
top of that hill: and here's a path that leads straight to it—at least, no it
doesn't do that." After going a few yards along the path, and turning several
sharp corners—"but I suppose it will at last. But how curious it twists! It's
more like a corkscrew than a path!"

Through the Looking Glass (Carroll, 1872)

Teaching writing is filled with twists and turns; it is more like a corkscrew than a straight path. Seldom does it move from point A to point B without a hitch. New demands are always popping up unexpectedly, while familiar paths are often riddled with unmarked passages. Nothing about teaching writing is tension free or foolproof. It is a lifelong journey that takes persistence, commitment, and a desire to improve.

Teachers who embark on this journey will find that, although teaching writing is a lofty goal, never before in our history has so much been written about it. Countless studies building on the pioneering research of the 1970s—and now only a keystroke away—offer plenty of advice to guide instructional practice. The challenge, however, is making sense of this voluminous body of research and presenting it in a way that is conceptually sound and practical. Journeys: The Teaching of Writing in Elementary Classrooms provides such a conceptual framework for planning, implementing, and evaluating instruction and for presenting the strategies and skills necessary for achieving various kinds of writing. This framework is intended not only to create essential links between research and practicebut also to place all writing advice and instruction within a meaningful context that considers student needs and development, types of writing tasks, curricular goals, and ongoing assessment. Accordingly, you will not find separate chapters on grammar or assessment, prewriting or reading, spelling or the writing process. Instead, strategies and skills of the craft are integrated in ways that reflect natural connections, grounded in context, and presented when most needed or appropriate.

In addition to the book's conceptual framework and set of practices, the examples and details of its application should inspire a love and passion for writing and what it can do. The journey metaphor drives this point home. The fact that writing is not simply about the destination but about the quality of the journey is something every teacher understands. Teachers want their students to enjoy writing, to see it as an adventure filled with fascination and endless discoveries. In times of accountability and widespread testing, it is all too easy to lose sight of this. As a gentle reminder about the playfulness of language and the joys and rewards of writing, quotes from Through the Looking Glass (1872) open each chapter. Lewis Carroll, its creator, is a genius at showing how curiosity and imagination can provide splendid adventures for children.

Another important message of the journey is its emphasis on growth and change. Like the journey motifs in children's literature, where the main character goes off on an adventure and returns changed in some way, students are transported beyond the written word to new understandings of self and the world. They perceive and look at things with increased sensitivity and sensibilities; confront writing problems and gain, new confidence; and learn patience, commitment, and discipline. These destinations are important to life work and should not be overlooked on this journey.

KEY TEXT FEATURES

This text is designed for novice as well as veteran teachers responsible for teaching writing in varied contexts and content areas in language arts, across the curriculum, and in cyberspace. It is appropriate for an undergraduate or graduate class and can be used as a stand-alone text or as one of a collection. Key text features guide readers through the book's discussions and practical applications. These include the following:

  • Assessment tools. To consider for student self-evaluation and for teacher observation, evaluation, and instruction
  • Classroom vignettes. To demonstrate classroom application of the writer's workshop across various types of writing and settings
  • Instructional methods. To guide minilessons and offer multiple approaches to writing instruction
  • Student work samples. To offer glimpses of children's development and responses to tasks
  • Children's literature. To accentuate the reading-writing connection and provide suggested books to accompany writing lessons
  • Multiple forms of literacy. To infuse drama, movement, music, and the visual arts into writing instruction
  • Journey reflections. To summarize and highlight major points covered in the chapter

A ROAD MAP FOR READERS

The chapters comprising this book are straightforward. Each chapter presents a particular form of writing with classroom examples to illustrate its implementation, and journey reflections that summarize both. An outline precedes each chapter and an end-of-book glossary serves as a prereading and summary resource for learning from the text.

Chapter 1 provides an overview of the book. It introduces the writer's workshop, a conceptual framework that includes five interrelated components—minilessons, reading, composing, sharing, and continuous assessment—and describes three classrooms in which the workshop is implemented.

Chapters 2 through 7 are each divided into two parts. The first part includes a discussion of the five workshop components:

  • Minilessons. Identifies two to four lesson topics that capture the striking features of the particular kind of writing under discussion.
  • Reading. Highlights the importance of reading from a writer's perspective: as a print and language model, a content source, and a vehicle for writing activity.
  • Composing. Includes strategies for the writing process: prewriting drafting, revising, and editing.
  • Sharing. Provides advice for setting up literacy forums to celebrate writing and offer feedback; considers publication of a final product and its presentation.
  • Continuous Assessment. Offers assessment, tools, such as rubrics, checklists, surveys, portfolios, and inventories, as they relate to the writer, the process, the text, and the context.

These five components anchor each chapter but address content in different ways. While the workshop components remain the same, the content, strategies, resources, teaching methods, and assessments shift and change according to the function of writing and students' needs and interests. Although these components are presented separately, in actuality, they are interrelated and should be taught as such. Moreover, the information presented in each component should be considered suggestive, not comprehensive or prescriptive.

In the second part of each chapter, vignettes are presented of three elementary classrooms in which the writer's workshop components are effectively applied in various genres of writing. For example, in the story chapter, students write animal fantasy, pourquoi tales, and science fiction. In the personal writing chapter, they compose autobiographies, letters, and personal narratives. Sample lessons and student work products grounded in the writing process are illustrative of various kinds of writing. Appearing in the table below are class rosters of students whose work will appear throughout the text. You may wish to refer to this table as you read the classroom lessons. Although each lesson is presented by grade level, most are adaptable to almost any age. Try to think outside the box and imagine how you might modify and use the lessons in your classroom.

As you journey throughout the chapters you will meet three classroom teachers who will guide you along the way. These teachers, although diverse in appearance, personality, and instructional style, are equally committed to their students and their own professional growth.

  • In the first grade is Vivian Hernandez, a vivacious woman with a ready smile and strong commitment to children. She is a creative and dedicated professional who has been teaching for 18 years.
  • The third-grade teacher is Kate Richardson, a petite, soft-spoken woman with a gentle demeanor, who, after 20 years of teaching, still exudes the same enthusiasm and passion for teaching as when she first began.
  • In the fifth grade is Ed Spinelli, admired by faculty and students alike and twice named teacher of the year. Ed, who is also a graduate student in administration and a father of three, has a self-critical openness toward young people and brings a sense of humor and vitality to the classroom.

Practically speaking, students are the travelers on this writing journey, but they are also guides. The children named on the class roster on the previous page represent a range of different writers. Because the boys and girls are from three different grade levels, their writing artifacts exhibit various skills, abilities, maturity levels, learning styles, interests, and cultures. Their writing samples provide you with an opportunity to observe writing experiences in typical elementary classrooms. You can use these examples to help develop a sense of children's skills and learning needs with regards to writing. Throughout the book, teachers and students are referred to by their first names. In cases where participants remain anonymous, pronouns he and she will be alternated by chapter to avoid the awkwardness of gendered language.

Although there is much to be learned from a text focusing on practical application, ultimately you will have to adapt the information and map out a plan for following your own steady and unwavering course. Think of yourself as one of the travelers, and as the adventure unfolds, imagine the possibilities for your own classroom.

Read More Show Less

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