Journeys in Time: A New Atlas of American History

Journeys in Time: A New Atlas of American History

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by Rodica Prato, Susan Buckley, Elspeth Leacock
     
 

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Paddle in a birchbark canoe with the Anishinabe and brave the Atlantic with the Pilgrims. Drag cannons across the icy Hudson for George Washington and meet the West with Lewis and Clark. Journeys in Time takes you on twenty journeys that have shaped our national past, allowing you to follow in the footsteps of the real people who made American history.See more details below

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Overview


Paddle in a birchbark canoe with the Anishinabe and brave the Atlantic with the Pilgrims. Drag cannons across the icy Hudson for George Washington and meet the West with Lewis and Clark. Journeys in Time takes you on twenty journeys that have shaped our national past, allowing you to follow in the footsteps of the real people who made American history.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Two New Atlases of American History by Elspeth Leacock and Susan Buckley make the past exciting and accessible by designating one important era to each copiously illustrated spread. Young explorers take Journeys in Time, illus. by Rodica Prato, at the sides of Nanabush, a Native American who leads his people to the Great Lakes region; a ship's boy on Christopher Columbus's crew in 1492; and with Big Joe Bailey and Harriet Tubman on the Underground Railroad in 1856, just to name a few. Clearly labeled maps and numbered captions make it easy to follow along. Places in Time, illus. by Randy Jones, uses the same format to take aspiring travelers through a Pecos pueblo in 1627; Philadelphia in 1787; 1849 Fort Laramie; as well as tenement life in New York City in 1916. ( Mar.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Crammed full of maps, facts and kid-friendly narrative, this book uses engaging storytelling methods to highlight American history. Ben Franklin's move to Philadelphia, for instance, is shown as a young man's escape from a stifling home life. The painful story of Venture Smith begins with him as a young boy in Africa, kidnapped and enslaved and never again to see his homeland, but ends with freedom and success. The authors choose some other fascinating bits of our past, such as bringing cannons to Boston for the American Revolution, "Dame Shirley" going to the Gold Rush, and the first man to fly coast to coast in the early days of aviation. Teachers will like the excellent maps, and kids will enjoy learning things like the fact that Daniel Boone never wore a coonskin cap, and that Meriwether Lewis took his dog along on the trip. 2001, Houghton Mifflin, $15.00. Ages 9 to 11. Reviewer: Donna Freedman
KLIATT
These imaginative books, Places in Time and Journeys in Time, are aimed at an older elementary audience, but they should do fine by younger YAs and they're sure to delight teachers as well. Each volume covers its topic in 20 chapters, built around an annotated map (Journeys) or place diagram (Places). Text takes readers through 10 or 12 annotated spots on the double-page stops. For instance, the Lowell Mill Town double page in Places has stops that discuss boarding house life and waterpower, among others; the stops on Journeys' pages are more obvious ones. Topics cover traditional and more contemporary historical approaches. We get the voyage of the Mayflower and founding New Mexico; we go to the Pacific with Lewis and Clark, take the Underground Railroad and leave Vietnam. In Places we go from Cahokia, Illinois to New Plymouth, Boonesborough and Ellis Island. The text is clear and interesting, and a notes section at the end of the books provides a wonderfully concise explanation of where information came from. KLIATT Codes: J—Recommended for junior high school students. 2001, Houghton Mifflin, 48p. illus. maps. index., Levinson
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-In the first book, a winning blend of facts, maps, and the drama of a well-written story results in an unusual and exciting view of this country's past. Some of the 20 individuals highlighted are well known, such as Daniel Boone, Ben Franklin, and Louis Armstrong. Others are more obscure, like Dame Shirley, a New England woman in the Gold Rush, and Venture Smith, an enslaved six-year-old African prince. Each double-page spread features an introduction, a story with numbered paragraphs relating to the map or illustration, a fact box, and colorful illustrations. All information is carefully researched and includes many primary resources. Any fictionalizing is marked with single quotation marks, while statements with actual historical evidence have double quotes. The second title uses the same format to present 20 sites in American history at the moment of their historical significance, beginning in 1200 (Cahokia) and ending in 1953. Places and times include New Plymouth-1627, Charlestown-1739, Saratoga-1777, Philadelphia-1787, Abilene-1871, and Chicago-1893. The detailed cutaway views of homes, forts, and mills are impressive enough to keep readers looking again and again. These fascinating slices of life stir the imagination and lead to questions and further research. Neither title has a bibliography, but scholars, historians, libraries, and museums are credited in the notes sections. While the books are perfect for individual perusal, educators will delight in the curriculum potential.-Pamela K. Bomboy, Chesterfield County Public Schools, VA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher

"A great way to get readers interested in the U.S.'s past and people." Booklist, ALA

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618311149
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
06/23/2003
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
48
Sales rank:
873,146
Product dimensions:
11.00(w) x 9.50(h) x 0.14(d)
Age Range:
9 - 11 Years

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