Joy, Inspiration, and Hope (Carolyn and Ernest Fay Series in Analytical Psychology)

( 1 )

Overview


Also available in an open-access, full-text edition at http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/85766

?Emotion is an expression of the self,? Verena Kast writes in this ground-breaking study of the neglected emotions of joy, inspiration, and hope. ?If we decide we no longer want to hide behind empty shells, then we will have to allow certain emotions more room. We will have to let ourselves laugh louder, cry louder, and shout for joy.?

Kast skillfully and engagingly makes...

See more details below
Paperback
$14.34
BN.com price
(Save 15%)$16.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $1.99   
  • Used (4) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview


Also available in an open-access, full-text edition at http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/85766

“Emotion is an expression of the self,” Verena Kast writes in this ground-breaking study of the neglected emotions of joy, inspiration, and hope. “If we decide we no longer want to hide behind empty shells, then we will have to allow certain emotions more room. We will have to let ourselves laugh louder, cry louder, and shout for joy.”

Kast skillfully and engagingly makes the case that not only therapists and analysts but also individuals seeking growth in their own lives should give more attention to the elated emotions. Fear of excess (mania) and analytic preoccupation with grief, anxiety, and depression have together caused joy and hope to be shunned as a focus in individuation (the process toward wholeness). Kast convincingly demonstrates the role of joy in relationship and existential involvement. Joy answers the human need for elated feeling and meaning in our lives, a need which is often filled in modern society by secularized parodies of religious ecstasy, such as addiction and compulsiveness.

Kast explores the Dionysian myth as an archetypal image of the transforming effect of ecstasy on the personality. She considers Sisyphus, the absurd hero of French existentialism, as the symbol for rejection of false hope and joy, rejection which clears the way for true hope rooted in basic trust and the positive mother archetype. She suggests simple techniques for recapturing our joy through development of an autobiography of joy. Using this approach, we can discover what gives us joy personally, how we can best experience joy, and how and why we choke off our joy. By viewing joy, inspiration, and hope as core emotions in our being, we open ourselves to greater wholeness and fuller life.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal

“ . . . Kast presents a Jungian existential analysis of joy. While much has been written about the dark emotions of depression and anxiety, joy and hope are often ignored . . . . Certain that civilization today contains a lack of ecstasy and a loss of inspiration, Kast also discusses the relevance of the mythology of Dionysus, mysticism, and religious ecstasy. She follows with a documentation of the existential existence of hope from Sartre and Camus. Her work could be considered the academic counterpart to Norman Cousins (Head First: The Biology of Hope), who endorses Kast’s theories.”--Library Journal

Psychological Perspectives

“Dr. Kast’s simplicity of language is deceptively 'pop’; she shows both a grasp of the area and a capacity for original thinking which can be valuable, indeed . . . . I can definitely recommend it to those who are, like me, tired of the endless 'wounded healer’ imagery and convinced, as is Professor Kast, of the tremendous value of joy, inspiration, and hope.”--Psychological Perspectives
Journal of Analytical Psychology

" . . . simple, straightforward and written in an easy style for readers who have had no exposure to analytical psychology. The book has a glossary of terms and the language is relaxes and conversational. . . a curious book which reveals how difficult it is to stay pop in a field which forces us to become serious and introspective."--Journal of Analytical Psychology

— David Tacey

Choice
“ . . . brims with insights.”—Choice
Spirituality & Health

“Verena Kast, a professor of psychology at the University of Zurich, has written an engaging and thought-provoking book on the neglected emotions of elation. This paperback is brimming over with insights into the emotions of joy, inspiration, and hope.” --Spirituality & Health
Coauthor of Female Authority: Empowering Women through Psychotherapy

“A practical work about ethereal emotions, this book offers a taxonomy of positive emotional states. Psychotherapists, educators, writers of fiction, and poets will discover meaning and metaphor in descriptions and examples of those emotions that motivate and carry us into creative activity. Dr. Kast’s clear, crisp style and her rich clinical examples invite her reader to enjoy an engagement with unusually inspiring material. Here is the ‘heart mind’ of our emotional life.”--Polly Young-Eisendrath

— Polly Young-Eisendrath, Ph.D.

Author of Solitude: A Return to Self - Anthony Storr

“Psychotherapists spend most of their time treating people who are notably lacking in joy, inspiration, and hope; and so have little to say about these vital aspects of existence. Dr. Kast has performed a valuable service by making them the subjects of her lectures. I particularly appreciated her technique of encouraging patients to recapture moments of joy by writing autobiography. Even the most depressed person must have had some experiences of joy; and reliving these through writing about then makes it more likely that they will reappear. This is an unusual and valuable book.”--Anthony Storr
Author of Jung and the Post-Jungians - Andrew Samuels

“Verena Kast's rescue of joy, inspiration and hope from the grey margins to which psychology has banished them could well mark a turning-point for the field. For, in this most Dionysian of books, she challenges and overturns many of the assumptions and clichés which bedevil us: That childhood is always a horrid period, dominated by defective and abusing parents; that elation and ecstasy are somehow immature and suspicious; that healing exclusively involves suffering; that hope is delusive and hostile to so-called reality."--Andrew Samuels
Coauthor of Female Authority: Empowering Women through PsychotherapyPolly Young-Eisendrath

“A practical work about ethereal emotions, this book offers a taxonomy of positive emotional states. Psychotherapists, educators, writers of fiction, and poets will discover meaning and metaphor in descriptions and examples of those emotions that motivate and carry us into creative activity. Dr. Kast’s clear, crisp style and her rich clinical examples invite her reader to enjoy an engagement with unusually inspiring material. Here is the ‘heart mind’ of our emotional life.”--Polly Young-Eisendrath
Norman Cousins

“The book combines superb content with literary quality. In fact, just in the act of reading the book you experience the very emotions identified in the title. . . . Kast [contributes] so handsomely to the means by which human beings can profit from important aspects of their uniqueness.”--Norman Cousins, author of Head First: The Biology of Hope
Journal of Analytical Psychology - David Tacey

" . . . simple, straightforward and written in an easy style for readers who have had no exposure to analytical psychology. The book has a glossary of terms and the language is relaxes and conversational. . . a curious book which reveals how difficult it is to stay pop in a field which forces us to become serious and introspective."--Journal of Analytical Psychology
Choice

“ . . . brims with insights.”--Choice
Library Journal
In this first installment in the ``Fay Book Series in Analytical Psychology,'' Kast (psychology, Univ. of Zurich) presents a Jungian existential analysis of joy. While much has been written about the dark emotions of depression and anxiety, joy and hope are often ignored. ``When we work with our emotions,'' Kast writes, ``we work with our identity.'' She recommends developing an ``autobiography of joy,'' which is a technique of recalling past happy events in order to restructure the present. Certain that civilization today contains a lack of ecstasy and a loss of inspiration, Kast also discusses the relevance of the mythology of Dionysus, mysticism, and religious ecstasy. She follows with a documentation of the existential existence of hope from Sartre and Camus. Her work could be considered the academic counterpart to Norman Cousins ( Head First: The Biology of Hope , LJ 10/1/89), who endorses Kast's theories. A glossary and references are appended. Recommended for academic psychology collections.-- Lisa Wise, Steele Memorial Lib., Elmira, N.Y.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author


VERENA KAST holds a doctoral degree in psychology from the University of Zurich. After having served nine years as president of the Swiss Association for Analytical Psychology, she is now vice-president of the International Association of Analytical Psychology. She has published eighteen books in German, three of which—The Nature of Loving, A Time to Mourn, and The Creative Leap—have been translated into English. Her works also appear in Japanese, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, and Italian. Joy, Inspiration, and Hope is the first of her books to appear originally in English. Kast is professor of psychology at the University of Zurich and an instructor and training analyst at the C. G. Jung Institute, Zurich.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Foreword
Acknowledgments
Prologue 3
Pt. I A Psychology of the Emotions
1 The Foolishness of the Tender-Minded? 11
2 Feelings, Affects, and Moods 21
3 The Interpersonal Context of Emotions 33
Pt. II Joy
4 Joy as Elevation 41
5 Sources of Joy 49
6 Biographical Reconstructions of Joy 54
Pt. III Anatomy of Joy
7 The Joy After and the Joy Before 67
8 Making and Unmaking Joy 75
9 The Shadow Side of Joy 85
Pt. IV Inspiration
10 The Existential Meaning of Mania 97
11 Ecstasy, Inspiration, and Creativity 107
12 Dionysus and Symbiosis 115
Pt. V Hope
13 Sisyphus's Hidden Hope 135
14 Hope in the Realm of the Mother Archetype 148
Epilogue 157
Glossary 161
References 166
Index 169
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    "We risk our lives in order to feel alive" states Swis

    "We risk our lives in order to feel alive" states Swiss Jungian psychotherapist, author and professor of psychology at the University of Zurich, Dr. Verena Kast. Proposing a new approach to healing, she suggests we not painfully track our devastation. Instead, we are to ask ourselves: How can I get my joy back? How do I retrieve this biogenetic inheritance, intrinsically mine?

    This book reminds me of a story of a young woman who escaped a terrible trauma in the southern U.S. which hurt her so badly that when she staggered into a New York bus depot she collapsed and was taken to hospital. She could barely speak for weeks. Her psychologist employed a technique of which Dr. Kast would heartily approve: she asked her client to name one thing that made her feel happy...just one. The young woman replied that she knew for certain that she liked chocolate. Her love of chocolate then, became the foundation for her on-going recovery.

    Dr. Kast suggests that it is the search for joy that both motivates and sustains us despite the traumas of life. She says this search "...is based in the realm of the nurturing mother archetype" (in contrast to that of the father archetype where we minutely analyze our difficulties in order to be more conscious of them.)

    The argument of this analytical text is that "we are not only flung into life, as the emotion of anxiety suggests, but we are also carried by life." In tracking our lost joy we must steadfastly avoid alluring imitations that ultimately disappoint, such as the ecstatic yet brief burst of joy gleaned from dependencies on drugs, alcohol, sex, gambling, competition, power, control and prestige. These escapes establish further sub-dominances of cruelty such as sadism. Kast describes a subtle avoidance of joy:

    "Many people say `Do I have the right to rejoice when everything is so bad in the world?'
    I have also heard this subtle form of sadism expressed in a slightly different way: `Not only do you speak about joy; you even take shameless delight in it. Meanwhile, the world is coming apart at the seams.' Less subtly stated, a sadistic commandment lurks in the background: "Thou shalt not rejoice" as if to imply that only a disgraceful human being is capable of rejoicing. When we think of how vitalizing joy actually is, this prohibition of joy because of the terrible state of the world proves to be sadistic. We are outraged by brutal sadists, but we need to keep an eye out for the subtle sadists as well."

    Kast explains that in order to steadfastly pursue joy, and keep it, we must employ hope. The way to contain our joy over the long haul involves a willingness to behave as though there is, in fact, something better.This better is what Kast believes to be holiness and she names it `hope'.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)