The Joy of Cooking

The Joy of Cooking

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by Irma S. Rombauer, Marion R. Becker
     
 

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Whether you're wondering what to do with that pheasant your brother-in-law shot or how to cook a perfect coddled egg, every home cook needs a reliable reference cookbook to turn to for solid information, advice on technique, and great recipes. We've collected our favorite kitchen bibles of all time, including the latest edition of Joy of Cooking, useful notSee more details below

Overview

Whether you're wondering what to do with that pheasant your brother-in-law shot or how to cook a perfect coddled egg, every home cook needs a reliable reference cookbook to turn to for solid information, advice on technique, and great recipes. We've collected our favorite kitchen bibles of all time, including the latest edition of Joy of Cooking, useful not just for the beginning cook but for old kitchen hands as well.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Following the latest edition by nearly a decade, this new take on a classic drops some of the trendy stuff introduced earlier and returns to good, old-fashioned cooking like casseroles and canning. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher
James Beard The classic work, which covers the entire gamut of kitchen procedures and is easy to use.

Cecily Brownstone Important as is the information in this encyclopedic cookbook, it's the imprint of Irma Rombauer's and Marion Rombauer Becker's personalities that makes Joy of Cooking the best loved cookbook to come out of these United States.

Julia Child ...it is definitely number one on my list...the one book of all cookbooks in English that I would have on my shelf -- if I could have but one.

Craig Claiborne The finest basic cookbook available. It is a masterpiece of clarity.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780672523854
Publisher:
Macmillan Publishing Company, Incorporated
Publication date:
12/01/1977
Edition description:
REVISED
Pages:
930

Related Subjects

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This recipe can be found in Joy Of Cooking's Stuffing chapter.

BASIC BREAD STUFFING
8 to 10 cups

This and the bread stuffing recipes that follow yield enough to stuff a 14- to 17-pound turkey. Many of the variations yield enough for an additional small casserole of stuffing. To stuff an oven roaster or 6 to 8 rock Cornish hens, halve the recipes. For a larger turkey, increase all the ingredients by half. The optional egg makes the stuffing firm. If you prefer the bread to be moist, skip the toasting step.

Position a rack in the center of the oven. Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Toast until golden brown:

1 pound sliced firm white sandwich, French, or Italian bread, including crusts, cut into 1/2-inch cubes, or 10 cups lightly packed bread cubes

Turn into a large bowl. Heat in a large skillet over medium-high heat until the foam subsides:

4 to 8 tablespoons (1/2 to 1 stick) unsalted butter

Add and cook, stirring, until tender, about 5 minutes:

2 cups chopped onions 1 cup finely chopped celery

Remove from the heat and stir in:

1/4 to 1/2 cup minced fresh parsley
1 teaspoon dried sage, or 1 tablespoon minced fresh
1 teaspoon dried thyme, or 1 tablespoon minced fresh
I teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated or ground nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
Stir into the bread cubes and toss until well combined. Depending on how much butter you started with and how firm you want the stuffing, stir in, a little at a time, until the stuffing is lightly moist but not packed together:
1/3 to 1 cup chicken stock 1 to 2 large eggs, well beaten (optional)

Adjust the seasonings. To use as a stuffing, reheat just before spooning it into the bird(s). Or moisten with additional:

Stock and/or egg
and turn into a large, shallow buttered baking dish. Bake in a 350°F oven until the top has formed a crust and the stuffing is heated through, 25 to 40 minutes.

This information can be found in the Joy Of Cooking's Poultry chapter.

RULES FOR STUFFING BIRDS

1. Always stuff the bird just before roasting2. Have the stuffing hot and pack it loosely in the body and neck cavities. The stuffing must reach a temperature of 160°F during roasting to ensure that any possible pathogens are killed. If it is cold and packed tightly into the bird, it will not heat to this point until long after the bird is cooked through.

3. You must close the cavities in order to keep the stuffing in place. The quickest and most efficient way to do this is by sewingthe cavities shut with a trussing needle and twine. If you do not own a trussing needle, secure the body cavity with small skewers and lacing (kits for this purpose are sold at kitchen shops) and close the neck cavity with toothpicks.

4. When the bird has cooked through, take the temperature of the stuffing by plunging the stem of the thermometer deep into the body cavity. If the stuffing has not yet reached 160°F, simply take the bird out of the oven, scoop the stuffing into a buttered casserole, and bake it in the hot oven while the bird stands before carving.

5. Finally, always take all the stuffing out of the cooked bird as soon as you begin to carve. Stuffing left inside a large turkey may remain warm for several hours, even if the bird is refrigerated, providing a perfect environment for bacterial growth.

Copyright © 1997 by Simon & Schuster Inc., The Joy of CookingTrust and the MRB Revocable Trust

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